Promotions, Awards

Booklist Editors Read for Fun 2007

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American Libraries Associate Editor Dan Kraus talked to seven editor-reviewers for Booklist Magazine about the books they read in their spare time in 2007. Learn one editor's excuse for not reading Harry Potter, how another found cheer in "an intrusive and lying government, torture, and nuclear experiments," and the treasure a third found in Montana

Kareem Abdul-Jabbar Speaks Out for Libraries

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This year, NBA legend and author Kareem Abdul-Jabbar is this year's honorary Library Card Sign-up Month chair. “The library has always been my own personal time machine. I can walk through the doors and land in any place, any time period in history. I didn’t have to wonder what their worlds were like; I could experience it first hand,” Jabbar has said.

En tu biblioteca campaign officially launches

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“I can help you” are words that resonate with librarians and library users alike. However, it’s the words “yo te puedo ayudar” (“I can help you”) that are the focus of the En tu biblioteca Campaign.

Launched in September, the “en tu biblioteca” (“@ your library”) campaign was developed with Univision Radio and the ALA to reach out an encourage members of the Latino community to use their local library. The campaign communicates how libraries create opportunities for Latino adults and their children by providing trusted help from librarians and free public access to information

Core Collection: Graphic Women

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Dale Messick started the first enduring newspaper comic strip by a woman, Brenda Starr, in 1940, and Nicole Hollander (Sylvia), Cathy Guisewite (Cathy), and Lynn Johnston (For Better or Worse) followed in her footsteps, only much later. Women creating graphic novels came still later. In fact, this core collection of books either made up of comic-book short stories and comic-book serials or created as books is an honor roll of pioneers.

Rock for Reading 2008: A Concert for Literacy

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Rock For Reading (R4R) surely lived up to its name November 22, 2008 at the Concert For Literacy. Not only did co-headliners Steve Earle and Tom Morello, also known as The Nightwatchman, storm the Vic Theatre in Chicago with some righteous rock, but more than $25,000 was raised for reading. Earle sang his songs of love and loss with characteristic emotional intensity, while Morello's anthemic "One Man Revolution," among other pointed numbers, reminded the audience of the historic political event that had recently transpired. There was more than a note of optimism in the air, but these contemporary protest singers also acknowledged the enormous task that lies ahead. There is, in fact, much left to do in the struggle against injustice–and the fight for universal literacy. Still, though the message maybe serious, the messengers sure know how to have a goodtime and their freewheeling energy touched everyone in the room.

Step Up to the Plate @ your library Swings into Action

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The boys of summer are stepping up to the plate, so why not join them? The American Library Association and the National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum are getting into the swing of things by launching the fourth season of Step Up to the Plate @ your library. It could be your chance to win a trip to the National Baseball Hall of Fame!

Wisconsin student selected as grand-prize winner of Step Up to the Plate @ your library

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Last weekend, 11-year-old Oscar Youngquist of Racine, Wis. received a personalized tour of the National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum in Cooperstown, N.Y. It was a once in a lifetime moment, and it was all made possible by a trip to the Racine Public Library.

On October 3, Step Up to the Plate spokesperson and Hall of Famer Ozzie Smith, drew Youngquist’s name as the grand-prize winner.

Tell Woman's Day How the Library Helped You in Tough Financial Times

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These days, everyone is looking to save money.  If the library is part of your personal financial recovery plan, Woman’s Day magazine wants to hear about it.  From now until May 18, women aged 18 and up are invited to send in a story about how they have used the library helped them out of a tight financial crunch.  Email your story in 700 words or less to womansday@ala.org.  Woman’s Day will select up to four stories to be featured in the March 2010 issue of the magazine.  For official rules and additional details, visit the Woman’s Day Web site.

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