Literacy

Dora the Explorer Supports Family Literacy During Día Celebration

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As the nation’s population continues to become more diverse, hundreds of libraries will showcase their multicultural programs and services this April 30th during the national El día de los niños/El día de los libros (Children's Day/Book Day) celebration. This year marks the 12th anniversary of the observance, also known as Día, and libraries across the country will host Día celebrations with family programs including bilingual story hours, book giveaways, and other literacy events.

Changing Lives Through Literature

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Have you ever read a novel that has impacted your life in a profound and meaningful way, or made you feel as though you’re not alone? Literature has the power to transform lives. This is the driving philosophy behind Changing Lives through Literature (CLTL), an award-winning alternative sentencing program that has grown from one chapter in Massachusetts in the fall of 1991, to roughly 20 chapters across the United States and England today.

Welcoming Libraries: How Communities’ Favorite Public Institutions Are Settling New Immigrants

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If you’re listening to the presidential debates, you know immigration continues to be a hot issue in America. Foreign-born residents now constitute nearly 13% of the American population, a rate not seen since 1910. A new report from the Urban Libraries Council (ULC) entitled “Welcome, Stranger: Public Libraries Build the Global Village” reports on trends for the spread of immigration into new cities, and the role public libraries play in welcoming and settling new residents

Rethinking the E-Rate

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What is the largest source of potential federal funding for public libraries? Your first thought may naturally be the Library Services and Technology Act , a program that provided around $220 million for libraries in FY2008. But the correct answer is the Education-Rate Program, commonly known as the “e-rate,” with at least $2.25 billion per year—one of the four programs that comprise the federal Universal Services Fund (USF) that was established in the Communications Act of 1934 to equalize the cost of telephone services to underserved areas of the country. The 1996 Telecommunications Act took it a step further by adding support for advanced telecommunications and information services, extending the USF’s priorities to include K–12 schools and public libraries. Thus, the birth of the e-rate.

Booklist Adult Readers' Forum: The Post-9/11 Novel

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At the ALA Annual Conference in Anaheim, California, June 29, Booklist hosted a forum on the burgeoning genre of post-9/11 literature. Booklist Online Senior Editor Keir Graff (My Fellow Americans) led the panel of distinguished authors, including Carolyn See (Golden Days), speaking about conflating personal and global catastrophe; Janette Turner Hospital (Due Preparations for the Plague), discussing her visit to Ground Zero and how it influenced her book; and Ellen Gilchrist (A Dangerous Age), talking about the yet-unwritten definitive 9/11 book.

Library Grows A Lush Imagination

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Where was Ray Bradbury when the stock market came crashing down in 1929? Others, jobless by the millions, ate in soup kitchens and slept in cardboard jungles, and where was he? Ray Bradbury was on Mars.

Sheltered between the pages of Edgar Rice Burrough’s Mars tales, nine-year-old Ray wasn’t worried about his dad holding a job, or where his next meal would come from. He was worried about Ras Thavas transplanting his brain into the body of a giant ape. Other days he might travel to Oz to cavort with the likes of Button-Bright, and Ojo the Munchkin boy. All characters he pulled from library shelves in hometown Waukegan, Illinois

Library Thief Turns Friend

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Most of us have fond memories of our hometown public library, and some of us can recall stories of how a library or librarian touched our life in a profound and meaningful way. Here at I Love Libraries, we invite readers to share these stories. So far we have received many. Some are moving, some are inspirational, and some are quite funny. Larry Burns’ story is all three.

Recently, Larry – an artist, musician, and highway sign maker from Barberton, OH – shared with us a story from his childhood,  when one encounter with a kind and understanding librarian opened up a whole new world for him. To this day, Larry remains a faithful and enthusiastic patron of his local public library, and every summer, he volunteers to teach a free, 4-session guitar workshop at Barberton Public Library).

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