Libraries Transform

Students Can Also Be Experts in the Library

School librarian Kristina Holzweiss was flipping through the American Library Association’s (ALA) graphics catalog when she saw the Libraries Transform campaign’s “I’m an expert in” badges. The first thought that came to her mind was, “How can I use these in my school library?” Rather than she being the only one to wear a badge, Holzweiss decided to try them out with her student “techspert” team at Bay Shore Middle School (BSMS) in Long Island, N.Y. At BSMS, Holzweiss works with “techspert” students throughout different periods of the day. They help her in the library with everything from wrangling robots to creating websites and organizing the makerspace.

Beginning a New Chapter

When Kimberly Tate-Louie, a graduate MMLIS student at the University of Southern California (USC) became president of her American Library Association Student Chapter in May 2016, she vowed to put the chapter on the map. “We wanted to make a name for the chapter and make it known that there are passionate students involved in the program at USC and involved in the chapter,” she said. She said she was inspired by articles in American Libraries magazine about the Libraries Transform campaign. “What I like about Libraries Transform is that it’s based on how libraries are still relevant and continue to be relevant. They are more than relevant,” she said, especially in a digital environment.

Fixing a Stop Light Leads to Getting a Green Light for Community Action

The traffic light victory began with Red Hook Public Library Director Erica Freudenberger’s goal to change the perception of the library. Freudenberger said, at the time, many residents thought the library was a “musty old building that was best to be avoided.” With this in mind, the library director united staff members, politicians and local civic engagement specialists to make the library an agent of change.

Daviess County Public Library: Documentary Evidence

The Daviess County Public Library (DCPL) in Western Kentucky has not only embraced the Libraries Transform campaign; it has carried it to a higher level. Using the talents of its videographer, Michael Dunn, and pressing into service its recently acquired drone, the library produced a 10-minute documentary giving a short history of the American Library Association’s Libraries Transform campaign and showing how the library uses the campaign’s messaging.

Present Yourself as an Expert in the library

The Libraries Transform campaign is itself transforming. As the campaign continues to focus on libraries turning outward and engaging their communities, it is also turning inward as well by emphasizing the “expert in the library.” The initiative by American Library Association (ALA) President Julie Todaro aims at getting libraries to shine a light on their bushel basket – to put the daily transformative work they do front and center before the public.

Using Libraries Transform To Advocate for School Librarians and School Library programs

The Missouri Association of School Librarians (MASL) found many residents did not have an understanding of what school librarians do and wanted to raise awareness of the vital role certified school librarians and strong school library programs play in ensuring students have the best chance to succeed in today’s digital world.

'Root for Columbus Campaign' Transforms Community with Creative Projects

Headed by Library Director Cindy Fesemyer, the Columbus Public Library initiated a “Root for Columbus” campaign to bring the community together. The library started hosting community conversations, and staff members acted as natural facilitators by listening to residents and organizations. Through the discussions, the library found most people wanted to try new tactics to improve the community.

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