Articles

YouMedia, a 5,500-square- foot room on the first floor of the Harold Washington Library Center in downtown Chicago, buzzes with teens hanging out with friends, remixing their own rock videos, tapping into the library's large collection of youth literature, and using the Internet to dive deeply into issues of interest.Supported by the MacArthur Foundation, YouMedia, which opened in summer 2009, connects youth, books, media, and institutions around Chicago to encourage collaboration and creativity, yielding a novel 21st-century learning environment. Teenagers with a city library card have in-house access to more than 100 laptops, as well as video games and a Wii console. There are flat screen monitors on every wall, a small recording studio, performance space, and a geek-out area where they can learn about new media from adult mentors — and it is for teenagers only. READ MORE
Each year the American Library Association (ALA) honors books and media for children and teens. Recognized worldwide for the high quality they represent, the ALA Youth Media Awards guide parents, educators, librarians and others in selecting the best materials for youth. Selected by committees composed of librarians and other literature and media experts, the awards encourage original and creative work in the field of children’s and young adult literature and media. The award announcements were made as part of the ALA Midwinter Meeting, held in 2011 at the San Diego Convention Center. READ MORE
Each year the American Library Association (ALA) honors books and media for children and teens. Recognized worldwide for the high quality they represent, the ALA Youth Media Awards guide parents, educators, librarians and others in selecting the best materials for youth. Selected by committees composed of librarians and other literature and media experts, the awards encourage original and creative work in the field of children’s and young adult literature and media. The award announcements were made as part of the ALA Midwinter Meeting, held in 2011 at the San Diego Convention Center. READ MORE
Teens complaining of boredom have not gone unnoticed, especially by libraries in Wyoming.“They were always saying ‘We’re bored. There’s nothing to do,’” says Ellie Eaton, Assistant Youth Services Librarian at the Sweetwater County Library. “So, I said OK well what do you want to do? What are you interested in? They said music, poetry, acting and art. And  that’s where this all started.” READ MORE
In mathematics, catastrophe theory is the study of nonlinear dynamical systems which exhibit points or curves of singularity. The behavior of systems near such points is characterized by sudden and dramatic changes resulting from even very small perturbations. The simplest sort of catastrophe is the fold catastrophe.When a fold catastrophe occurs, a system that was formerly characterized by a single stable point evolves to a system with no stability. The point where stability disappears is known as the tipping point. READ MORE
Each year the American Library Association (ALA) honors books and media for children and teens. Recognized worldwide for the high quality they represent, the ALA Youth Media Awards guide parents, educators, librarians and others in selecting the best materials for youth. Selected by committees composed of librarians and other literature and media experts, the awards encourage original and creative work in the field of children’s and young adult literature and media. The award announcements were made as part of the ALA Midwinter Meeting, held in 2011 at the San Diego Convention Center. READ MORE
Two recent articles appearing on ZDNET (here and here), opened the door for an important discussion about the effects of shutting down libraries due to a lack of funding to keep them open, especially in light of efforts to make them havens for digital interaction.Historically, libraries have served as community cornerstones because of the wealth of resources they provide.  Even in the digital age, they provide very necessary assistance to many people, particularly those who cannot or have not readily adopted broadband – high speed Internet – in their homes. READ MORE
Egypt, a nation with a major internet economy, has pulled the plug on the World Wide Web in an apparent attempt to silence dissent. The Associated Press reported that at a half-hour past midnight in Egypt, January 28, the internet went dead. “Almost simultaneously, the handful of companies that pipe the internet into and out of Egypt went dark as protesters were gearing up for a fresh round of demonstrations calling for the end of President Hosni Mubarak’s nearly 30-year rule,” experts told AP.The report goes on to say that “it’s unlikely that what’s happened in Egypt could happen in the United States because the U.S. has numerous internet providers and ways of connecting to the internet. Coordinating a simultaneous shutdown would be a massive undertaking. “It can’t happen here,” said Jim Cowie, the chief technology officer and a co-founder of Renesys, a network security firm in Manchester, New Hampshire, that studies internet disruptions. “How many people would you have to call to shut down the U.S. internet? Hundreds, thousands maybe? We have enough internet here that we can have our own internet. If you cut it off, that leads to a philosophical question: Who got cut off from the internet, us or the rest of the world?” READ MORE
Virginia Commonwealth University  is Virginia’s largest institution of higher education, enrolling over 33,000 students and employing over 18,000 faculty and staff.  Classified by Carnegie as Research University (Very High Research Activity), VCU offers 38 doctoral, 73 masters, 3 professional, and 63 baccalaureate degrees. Twenty-seven of VCU's graduate, professional programs are ranked by U.S. News & World Report as among the best in the nation, with 21 programs ranking in the top 25 and two programs — sculpture and nurse anesthesia — ranked number one in the country.  Sponsored research funding totalled over $240 million in 2009-10. READ MORE
Each year the American Library Association (ALA) honors books and media for children and teens. Recognized worldwide for the high quality they represent, the ALA Youth Media Awards guide parents, educators, librarians and others in selecting the best materials for youth. Selected by committees composed of librarians and other literature and media experts, the awards encourage original and creative work in the field of children’s and young adult literature and media. The award announcements were made as part of the ALA Midwinter Meeting, held in 2011 at the San Diego Convention Center. READ MORE

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