Articles

“I can help you” are words that resonate with librarians and library users alike. However, it’s the words “yo te puedo ayudar” (“I can help you”) that are the focus of the En tu biblioteca Campaign.Launched in September, the “en tu biblioteca” (“@ your library”) campaign was developed with Univision Radio and the ALA to reach out an encourage members of the Latino community to use their local library. The campaign communicates how libraries create opportunities for Latino adults and their children by providing trusted help from librarians and free public access to information READ MORE
With the nation facing tough economic times, Americans are visiting their local public libraries more often and checking out items with greater frequency. Libraries across the United States report that more people are turning to libraries in record numbers to take advantage of the free resources available there. READ MORE
I love virtual libraries, the libraries that have sprouted up in three-dimensional virtual worlds such as Second Life, Active Worlds, Teen Second Life, and others. Like their bricks-and-mortar and web-based digital library cousins, virtual libraries offer information resources and services to patrons, but with some interesting twists. READ MORE
Rock For Reading (R4R) surely lived up to its name November 22, 2008 at the Concert For Literacy. Not only did co-headliners Steve Earle and Tom Morello, also known as The Nightwatchman, storm the Vic Theatre in Chicago with some righteous rock, but more than $25,000 was raised for reading. Earle sang his songs of love and loss with characteristic emotional intensity, while Morello's anthemic "One Man Revolution," among other pointed numbers, reminded the audience of the historic political event that had recently transpired. There was more than a note of optimism in the air, but these contemporary protest singers also acknowledged the enormous task that lies ahead. There is, in fact, much left to do in the struggle against injustice–and the fight for universal literacy. Still, though the message maybe serious, the messengers sure know how to have a goodtime and their freewheeling energy touched everyone in the room. READ MORE
The American Library Association (ALA) today announced the top books, videos and audiobooks for children and young adults - including the Caldecott, King, Newbery, Schneider Family and Printz awards - at its Midwinter Meeting in Denver.In addition, the ALA celebrated the 40th anniversary of the Coretta Scott King Book Awards and introduced a new award, the William C. Morris Award. It is also the first year that the Pura Belpré Award will be given annually. READ MORE
New York Times Bestselling Author Christopher Paolini dreamed of the day he could place one of his books on the shelf in his local library.“When I was able to do that, it was a memorable day,” he says.“As an author, it’s one of the true pleasures for me to think that I’ve been able to contribute at least a few entries into the library system.”Paolini views libraries as shrines to other authors. READ MORE
Before the Newbery, Caldecott, King, and ALA's other prestigious youth media awards were announced at the Midwinter Meeting in Denver, the selection committees crowded into tiny private rooms to call the honorees. This year, AL Focus was invited to capture some of those happy calls and reactions. Watch the calls! READ MORE
These days, everyone is looking to save money.  If the library is part of your personal financial recovery plan, Woman’s Day magazine wants to hear about it.  From now until May 18, women aged 18 and up are invited to send in a story about how they have used the library helped them out of a tight financial crunch.  Email your story in 700 words or less to womansday@ala.org.  Woman’s Day will select up to four stories to be featured in the March 2010 issue of the magazine.  For official rules and additional details, visit the Woman’s Day Web site. READ MORE
Teen Tech Week, the Young Adult Library Services Association’s annual celebration of the many tech resources available to teens at the library, takes place March 8-14. More than 1,700 libraries across the country are holding special events and offering resources on tech for teens, including gaming nights, workshops on podcasting or photography, online homework help sessions and more. For 20 participating libraries, Teen Tech Week 2009 will be particularly memorable, as they received the second round of Teen Tech Week Mini Grants.Thanks to the generosity of the Verizon Foundation, a 2009 Teen Tech Week Promotional Partner, YALSA gave out 20 grants of $450 cash (along with $50 in promotional Teen Tech Week products) to plan and sponsor events that encouraged teens to take advantage of the technological resources at their library. READ MORE
For the last sixteen years, Russell Memorial Library has been the home of the Chesapeake Poetry Festival. The first festival, held in 1993, was the result of a casual conversation between Norfolk attorney C. Edward “Eddie” Russell Jr. and Chesapeake Public Library Director Margaret “Peggy” Stillman. The idea began when Russell was taking a class in poetry at Virginia Commonwealth University taught by his longtime friend and Poet Laureate of Portsmouth Dave Smith. Russell asked Stillman if she thought holding a poetry workshop in a public library might be interesting and if Dave Smith could help. Not one to miss an opportunity (or a beat), Stillman enthusiastically agreed. With Russell and Smith helping, she began planning what would become an annual event. The Chesapeake Poetry Festival was introduced to the community as a celebration of the richness of Virginia’s regionally, nationally, and internationally known poets, presented through poetry readings and workshops. READ MORE

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