Articles

Miami, Fla.Dedicated: 1994Partners: Florida Center for the BookThe home of Isaac Bashevis Singer in the Surfside Towers in Miami Beach, Florida was designated a Literary Landmark by the Florida Center for the Book on June 24, 1994. The Nobel prize-winning author lived in the Surfside Towers from 1977 until his death in 1991.Singer was born in Poland and began his studies to become a rabbi in Warsaw. He eventually left rabbinical studies for journalism. He got a job as a reporter in Poland. He emigrated to the United States in 1935 and continued in the journalism field, however, he also started publishing his own works. Singer wrote the stories in Yiddish and then they were translated into English. READ MORE
When Teresa Lucas decided to teach basic life skills to young adults via an “Adulting 101” library program series last year, she was not expecting a media onslaught. But that’s what she got.“We had tens of thousands of Facebook hits, of calls, of emails. It was crazy,” says Lucas, who is assistant director of library services at North Bend (Oreg.) Public Library (NBPL). “Other libraries were saying: ‘Oh, tell me more, tell me more!’ At one point, I could barely keep up.”The frenzy reached its zenith on March 29, when Kelly Ripa, cohost of the nationally syndicated morning talk show Live with Kelly (now Live with Kelly and Ryan), said to much applause from the live audience, “They should offer this everywhere, not just at the North Bend Public Library.” READ MORE
It doesn't take an Einstein to realize the value of libraries, although Albert Einstein himself famously observed, "The only thing that you absolutely have to know is the location of the library."That is advice that people in communities far and wide, including Ridgewood, Wayne and Montclair (NJ), have taken to heart for decades.  However, libraries in those municipalities, and across North Jersey, are not merely repositories for books, but also hubs for learning and gathering.It is tax assistance at the Ridgewood Public Library, yoga sessions in front of the Montclair Public Library and reading with therapy dogs in the Wayne Public Library's Preakness Branch.  And the importance of libraries can't be overstated, particularly in New Jersey, when considering recent developments. The interlibrary loan process among the Bergen County Cooperative Library System, which typically handles more than 4,300 interlibrary loans per day among 76 North Jersey libraries, got back to normal only in recent months. This was after the vendor retained to manage interlibrary loans in the state did such a bad job that it led to a backlog of more than 100,000 volumes statewide this year. READ MORE
This spring, patrons of the Bristol Public Library (IN) got a surprise: little cat feet padding through the stacks. Page Turner, the library’s new feline, was a former stray picked up by the Humane Society until the staff found her a home.Dawn Powell, the library’s adult coordinator, explained, “We were looking for a dog, a ‘Paws to Read’ therapy dog. And then we said, ‘What about a rabbit? Something cuddly?’”The staff spent hours at the Humane Society of Elkhart County. And an older cat — the shelter estimated about 9 years old — with her tongue slipping out through missing teeth, caught a librarian’s eye.  “We picked her up and she just laid out in my boss’ arms. ... She’s really cute. Thinking, she’s a little older, she doesn’t have her two front teeth, let’s give her a forever home. We weren’t sure other people would take her,” Powell said. READ MORE
New Orleans, La.Dedicated: June 25th, 1993Partners: Friends of New Orleans Public Library624 Pirate’s Alley was designated a Literary Landmark by the Friends of New Orleans Public Library on June 25th, 1993 in honor of American author William Faulkner. Faulkner lived on the ground floor of the house in 1925.It was at this house in the French Quarter that Faulkner completed his first novel Soldier’s Pay. This was the novel that made Faulkner a famous author. Up until that point he was a starving artist struggling to make it in New Orleans. After the publishing of his first novel, Faulkner left for Paris, however the time spent in the shadow of the St. Louis Cathedral and the gardens in his backyard inspired some of his later novels including Mosquitoes, The Wild Palms, and Pylon. READ MORE
When Edwin Lindo was about 10 years old and growing up in San Francisco’s Mission District, his dad started taking him to a lively hole-in-the-wall restaurant called Radio Habana Social Club. “I’d spend hours looking at books there,” Lindo, now 31, recalls. “And all around me adults were having intense conversations: an Argentinian guy talking about the revolution in his country, a Peruvian talking about Che Guevara — everybody was talking about politics and art and books,” he says. “I loved it. That’s my goal for this place.”This place is Estelita’s Library, a new book haven/conversation hub housed inside The Wine Station on Beacon Hill and set to open on Saturday. (The space was formerly home to The Station coffee shop, which is now thriving in larger digs across the street, next to Roberto Maestas Plaza.) The tiny wine bar, open since October, already had a piano, a ceiling adorned with branches and birds nests (by Seattle artist Briar Bates) and a handful of tables. As of this weekend, it will boast newly installed bookshelves filled end to end. Sporting a beard, a woven-cedar hat and a Cuban guayabera shirt, Lindo is friendly and easygoing. He graduated from the University of Washington School of Law in 2012 and now teaches race and law classes there. He has no previous experience running a bookstore or working in a library.“I just love the idea of building community through knowledge,” he says. READ MORE
It's 9.15 a.m. when a dark green, 1993 Toyota truck that's logged 160,000 miles pulls into Tooele County (UT) jail parking lot. A tall, thin woman in khaki cargo pants and a black T-shirt gets out to unload boxes of donated books and cart them into the men’s jail library.Once the fiction and nonfiction have been mingled with the existing stock, she admires the 1,300 titles.“I’m into pretty. Pretty books are happy books,” says Toby Lafferty, who then bids the books farewell that October morning. “Bye guys, see you next time.” She often sends “good energy to the books. They’re going into places that are quite dark.”Men and women in 35 prisons and jails in 13 states nationwide depend on Lafferty and her Millcreek-based nonprofit, Books Inside, for a monthly supply of books to expand often decrepit libraries. Last year, Books Inside mailed 23,000 books to incarceration facilities. In Utah alone, she supplies seven jails and created libraries from nothing in the Tooele County and Kane County jails. READ MORE
In celebration of El día de los niños, el día de los libros (Children’s Day, Book Day) and its focus on diversity, the Tippecanoe Branch of the Milwaukee Public Library (WI) hosted a free Arabic culture event for local residents.Librarians at the location had not been able to present much programing about Arabic culture, which was a population represented in the surrounding neighborhoods. They saw the children’s literature holiday as an opportunity to involve that community and engage cross-cultural learning.“It is a celebration for those who are already familiar with Arabic culture, and also as a way to introduce it to people in our city,” said Jennifer Hron, Children’s librarian at the Tippecanoe Branch. “Milwaukee is kind of segregated and divided, so to be able to introduce people to new things in a way that is very welcoming and open and a lot of fun for everyone is something we really enjoy doing.”The Milwaukee Public Library service in the Tippecanoe neighborhood dates back nearly 100 years to 1916, when the area was a part of the Town of Lake. After a portion of the Town of Lake was annexed to the City of Milwaukee, a branch of the Milwaukee Public Library was established. READ MORE
Our nation’s archives preserve our history, but, thanks to the work of Natalia Fernández, they also promote the cause of social justice.As curator of the multicultural archives at Oregon State University and as the co-director and lead archivist for the Oregon State Queer Archives, she has preserved and shared the stories and histories of LGTBQ+ community members in Oregon and the Pacific Northwest.At Oregon State University, she has enhanced the library experience of both students and faculty, working, for example, on various projects with the office of Outreach and Engagement.According to Bradley Boovy, her nominator for the 2017 I Love My Librarian Award, “Natalia is patient and generous with her time. In introducing students to archival materials, she helps bring those materials to life through creative activities and exercises. For example, for the past two years Natalia has facilitated an event called Glitter in the Archives that gives students and community members the opportunity to craft with copies of archival materials. This is just one example of the kinds of innovative and creative ideas that she brings to her work with library users.” READ MORE
Gone are the days of libraries being silent zones, used for studying or reading only.Enter the Bob Miller Middle School (NV) library, and you’ll find students working together on projects and teachers giving instructions aloud. Reading, researching and innovating intersect in this modern environment surrounded by books and technology. The blended learning space recently served as ground zero for a sixth-grade project in which students created advocacy videos about water conservation. “My role is to get teachers and students to a place where they can use those 21st century skills,” the school’s certified teacher-librarian, Scott Hensley, said. “I’m giving them the tools.”Hensley has served as the school’s librarian since the building opened 17 years ago — a time period marked by rapid technology improvements and increasing reliance on the Internet. Now, every student in this middle school carries a Chromebook.As far as Hensley is concerned, the digital age only exacerbates the need for a school librarian, which he describes as a position that far exceeds “book manager.” READ MORE

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