Digital Library of the Week Archive

July 30, 2014: World War I Military Portraits, maintained by the Milwaukee (Wis.) Public Library, is comprised of more than 32,000 photographs, typewritten volumes, and service records. The items were compiled from collections of the American War Mothers Milwaukee County Chapter and the Milwaukee County Council of Defense. These items contain a wealth of genealogical information and provide a candid look into soldiers’ ideas and perceptions of the First World War. Included in the collection are portraits of service men and women in military uniform and less formal snapshots of individuals at their homes or serving in the theater of war.

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July 23, 2014: Charles Darwin’s Beagle Library is an electronic, full-text reconstruction of the nearly 400 books that accompanied the voyage of the Beagle(1831–1836), one of the most important scientific expeditions in history. The online Beagle library consists of over 195,000 pages containing more than 5,000 illustrations. The 2012–2014 Beagle library project has been funded by an Academic Research Fund grant by the Singapore Ministry of Education and supported by the Office of the Dean of the Faculty of Science at Charles Darwin University and the Charles Darwin University Foundation, Northern Territory, Australia. The project was directed by John van Wyhe, who first proposed reconstructing the Beagle library in 2006 while editing the Beagle field notebooks.

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July 16, 2014: Amsterdam’s Rijks museum offers a an extremely elegant, slick interface (Rijksstudio) to browse its vast collection, ranging through everything from Dutch Old Masters to 19th-century Japanese paintings. The grid-based system shows interactive, zoomable images of iconic paintings, furniture, and sculpture that can also be liked, saved, and shared on Facebook and Twitter. These range from Vermeer classics to Van Gogh self-portraits, flowers, and still-lifes. Users can create their own collections, curating and organizing the artwork into new combinations.

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July 9, 2014: The Association Images et Mémoiresin Paris is a French-language site that offers a digital archive of postcards, as well as some photographs and engravings, from all over Africa, especially francophone countries, during the colonial era. Founded in 1995, the Association seeks to work with anthropologists, photographers, and historians to make these images, often in repositories far from their countries of origin, accessible as cultural heritage. The images are grouped into categories of architecture, transportation, people, commerce and schools, agriculture, and group scenes.

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June 25, 2014: The Princeton University Library Western Americana Collection consists of photographs of Indians of the Americas and views of the American West, including landscapes, cityscapes, and mining, railroad, and agricultural operations. Also included are 

views of towns in Mexico. The bulk of the photographs date from the 19th century.

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June 18, 2014: The Prelinger Archives was founded in 1983 by Rick Prelinger in New York City. Over the next 20 years, it grew into a collection of more than 60,000 advertising, educational, industrial, and amateur films. In 2002, the film collection was acquired by the Library of Congress, Motion Picture, Broadcasting and Recorded Sound Division. The archives remains in existence, holding approximately 5,000 digitized and videotape titles (all originally derived from film) and a large collection of home movies, and amateur and industrial films acquired since 2002. Its goal remains to collect, preserve, and facilitate access to films of historic significance that haven’t been collected elsewhere. Getty Images represents the collection for stock footage sale, but some 2,800 key titles (now in the process of increasing to 5,000) are available through the Internet Archive.

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June 11, 2014: The Museum of New Zealand (Te Papa Tongarewa) has made 30,000 high-quality, high-resolution images available for free downloading from its Collections Online website as part of its commitment to providing open access licensing to images of the national collections. Some 14,000 images are available under a Creative Commons license CC BY-NC-ND, while 17,000 images are downloadable for any use at all. These images have no known copyright restrictions.

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June 4, 2014: Yale University’s James J. Ross Archive of African Images presents approximately 5,000 pictures of African art published before 1921. RAAI is the result of a collaboration between James J. Ross and Susan Vogel, the project’s codirectors. The archive aspires to include all the figurative African objects in books, periodicals, catalogs, newspapers, and other publications appearing in 1920 and earlier—the oldest dates to 1591. The archive does not include postcards or pamphlets of limited distribution, and focuses exclusively on figurative art. It is based mainly on the James J. Ross library augmented by publications from the libraries of Yale University and a few other institutions.

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May 28, 2014: The YIVO Institute for Jewish Research has created a digital library on Jewish Life in Poland that offers a variety of documents, videos (from film), audio clips in Yiddish, Polish, Hebrew, and Russian—all described in English. The writings range from poems, school essays, play manuscripts, sheet music, posters of political and cultural events, birth certificates, letters from Yiddish writers to publishers, posters of soccer matches, contributor lists for political groups and organizational minutes. The site is searchable by keyword and features galleries that can easily be browsed.

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May 21, 2014: Southern Nevada: The Boomtown Years brings together a wide range of original source materials found in widely diverse collections, mostly housed in the University of Nevada Las Vegas Libraries Special Collections. The Nevada State Museum and Historical Society in Las Vegas and the Clark County Heritage Museum have also contributed collections for this project, which contains more than 1,700 items. Most prominent and popular of these collections are the photographs and photograph albums taken, collected, and preserved by individuals and families who lived and contributed to the boom years. Other UNLV digital collections include showgirls, dining and menus, Howard Hughes, Nevada Test Site oral history, and maps.

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April 30, 2014: The National Library of Ireland has added some 10,500 newly digitized images, including dozens relating to historical figures like the Duke of Wellington, Daniel O’Connell, and Charles Stewart Parnell. Nearly one-third come from the Elmes portrait collection, named after librarian Rosalind Elmes who compiled it and consisting of 1,100 famous figures from Irish history up to the end of the 19th century. There are also 30 engravings of Jonathan Swift and rare portraits of Robert Emmet and Theobald Wolfe Tone. The new releases include the family photographic collection of Tom Clarke, one of the executed leaders of the 1916 Rising, and his wife Kathleen Clarke, along with correspondence with family, friends, and political associates in Ireland.

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April 23, 2014: The Digital Library of Inscriptions and Calligraphies, hosted by the Bibliotheca Alexandrina in Alexandria, Egypt, is a digital record of more than 3,000 writings carved on buildings and artifacts across the ages. Transliterations and translations of Ancient Egyptian, Arabic, Persian, Turkish, and Greek inscriptions are included, along with photos and detailed descriptions of the artifacts. Information is available in both Arabic and English. The inscriptions are browsable by language, the classification of the inscription, or type of artifact.

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April 16, 2014: The Illinois Digital Newspaper Collection, hosted by the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, combines 1.2 million pages of 44 newspapers in one freely accessible location. The site includes interactive features that allow users to tag articles, correct scanned text, and share on social media.

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April 9, 2014: The W. R. Gray Studio photographic collection, hosted by Fort Hays State University, Kansas, features some 29,000 images from glass plate negatives that were  produced by W. R. Gray Studio in St. John, Kansas. The original negatives are located in the Stafford County (Kans.) Historical Museum. The names of the people photographed are given as they are written (and sometimes misspelled) in the ledger; they are the payees, or the persons who paid for the photos. The Gray Studio was in operation in St. John from 1905 to 1981.

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April 2, 2014: The Goethe University Frankfurt in Frankfurt-am-Main, Germany, began a project in February 2011 to digitize the more than 2,800 medieval manuscripts and incunabula in its collections. The 1,000th manuscript scanned was The Divine Comedy by Dante Alighieri, written in northern Italy in the 14th century. Other pieces that have already been scanned include a 13th-century Parisian Bible from the Cistercian Abbey of Eberbach and the Rüst- und Feuerwerksbuch (Book of Weapons and Fireworks) of the city of Frankfurt, which was purchased in 1500 for the library. The detailed descriptions of the manuscripts (previously only available in the printed catalogs) have also been scanned and linked with the objects.

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March 26, 2014: The Leonard H. Axe Library Digital Collections contain selected material from Pittsburg (Kans.) State University’s Axe Special Collections and Archives pertaining primarily to southeast Kansas and the university. The collections specialize in printed materials from Southeast Kansas, its culture and inhabitants, and the correspondence, libraries, business files, and memorabilia of significant southeast Kansans. Collections include Ninth Army Air Force photos from World War II, mining communities and towns in Crawford and Cherokee counties, selected photographs relating to the filming of The Learning Tree directed by Gordon Parks in 1969, and oral history accounts about farming and farm life in southeast Kansas during the late 1800s and early 1900s.

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March 19, 2014: The Women’s Library @ LSE (London School of Economics) digital collections include a representative selection of the personal, political, and economic struggles that have symbolized women’s battle for equality over the past 500 years. The collection includes pamphlets, magazines, journals, documents, photographs, postcards, and books.

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March 12, 2014: The Alaska, Western Canada and United States Collection is a digital library of historic photographs documenting the geographic area of Alaska, the Pacific  Northwest, the Yukon Territory, and British Columbia curated by the University of Washington Libraries. The collection features images of Oregon, Idaho, and areas of interest in Alaska and the Yukon Territory relating to the Gold Rush of 1898–1900. Included also are images of mining activities, street scenes, Inuit and Native Americans of the region, hunting and fishing, transportation, and World War II installations.

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March 5, 2014: The Florida State University Digital Library provides online access to Florida State University’s rich and unique historical collections of photos, pamphlets, maps, manuscripts, and rare books. Currently, the library highlights collections from Special Collections and Archives, Heritage Protocol, and the Claude Pepper Library, including yearbooks from 1900 to 1997, historical photos of campus, and selections from the Paul A. M. Dirac Papers. It is run on the FL-Islandora platform, managed by the Florida Virtual Campus.

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February 26, 2014: Vassar College Libraries’ Albert Einstein Digital Collection documents a lesser-known aspect of Albert Einstein’s career: his social and political work in the United States and abroad, with special attention to Jewish affairs. A gift of Morris and Adele Bergreen in 2003, the collection was formed by Einstein’s friend and executor to his will, Otto Nathan, an economist and professor at several institutions of higher learning, including Vassar. It is composed of correspondence between Einstein and Nathan, as well as letters from Einstein’s wife, Elsa, to Nathan, some manuscripts, ephemera, and photographs of Einstein. A number of letters discuss the fate of Jews in Europe and other aspects of World War II. Others deal with Brandeis University, Jewish affairs in the United States, and personal matters.

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February 19, 2014: The French Revolution Digital Archive is a multiyear collaboration of Stanford University Libraries and the Bibliothèque nationale de France to produce a digital version of the key research sources of the French Revolution and make them available to the international scholarly community. The archive is based on two main resources, the Archives parlementaires (a chronologically-ordered collection of documentary sources) and some 14,000 images first brought together in 1989 and known as the Images de la Revolution française. Scholars are able to search each collection separately using an English or French interface, and across both collections.

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February 12, 2014: An upgraded version of the Leon Levy Dead Sea Scrolls Digital Library was launched February 4 by the Israeli Antiquities Authority. Visitors can view and explore 10,000 newly uploaded images of unprecedented quality. The website, first unveiled in 2013, also offers accompanying explanations pertaining to a variety of manuscripts, such as the book of Exodus written in paleo-Hebrew script, the books of Samuel, the Temple Scroll, Songs of Shabbat Sacrifice, and New Jerusalem. The upgraded website features many improvements besides the new multispectral images: improved metadata, additional manuscript descriptions, content pages translated into Russian and German in addition to the current languages, a faster search engine, and easy access from the site to Facebook and Twitter.

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February 5, 2014: The Joseph A. Labadie Collection at the University of Michigan is the oldest research collection of radical history in the United States, documenting a wide variety of international social protest movements of the 19th century to the present. It is named for anarchist and labor organizer Joseph Antoine Labadie (1850–1933). Some 1,423 photographs in the collection are now online.

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January 29, 2014: Drexel University’s Women Physicians, 1850s–1970s digital collection consists of correspondence, scrapbooks, clippings, college records, images, diaries, publications, and ephemera documenting the history of women physicians, beginning with the first medical school for women, Woman’s Medical College of Pennsylvania (WMCP). Founded in 1850, WMCP trained thousands of women physicians who practiced in all parts of the world, and provided rare opportunities for women to teach, practice, perform research, and manage a medical school. WMCP was also a long-time refuge for women students and faculty who faced quotas and discrimination elsewhere.

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January 15, 2014: The University of Idaho Campus Photographs Collection offers more than 3,000 digitized images that depict the campus from its beginning in 1889 to the present. The collection can be browsed by building, map, or timeline. A mobile version of the site also has been created to allow browsing for images nearest to the current location of the user’s smartphone. Images in the collection were acquired by the UI Library’s Special Collections and Archives and organized into groups over several decades. The images were digitized by librarians, technicians, and student workers in the Digital Initiatives unit during 2012 and 2013. The recent release of the collection commemorates the university’s 125th anniversary.

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January 8, 2014: The Ohio Postcard Collection contains more than 9,000 early-20th-century postcards of Ohio cities and towns from Aberdeen to Zoar. The collection, part of Columbus Memory, was originally acquired in the 1970s through funds from the John M. Lewis estate.Columbus Memory is a collaborative project between the Columbus (Ohio) Metropolitan Library and the Columbus Historical Society and offers access to thousands of images, primary documents, maps, and artifacts about Columbus, Ohio.

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December 18, 2013: The Rwanda Youth and Children’s Testimonies is now freely available online through the University of South Florida’s Holocaust and Genocide Studies Center. The Center has digitized 864 handwritten testimonies of children who were in the Gitarama prefecture describing their personalized experiences during the 1994 Rwanda genocide. Most of these testimonies depict what these children went through on a day-to-day basis from the time the genocide started on the evening of April 6, 1994, until the time the child was rescued. When the genocide was taking place, most of these children were between ages 8 and 15 years and most of them were still in elementary school. Many Tutsi refugees from other prefectures fled to Gitarama hoping to find a safe haven; Gitarama, however, is the prefecture where some of the most heinous killings took place.

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December 11, 2013: Franklin, the Franklin D. Roosevelt Presidential Library and Museum’s digital repository and virtual research room, was launched on December 4. Franklin offers 350,000 pages of archival documents, 2,000 historical photographs, and hundreds of archival finding aids and collection descriptions. Documents include Franklin and Eleanor Roosevelt’s New Deal and wartime correspondence with world leaders, government administrators, and regular Americans. Photographs include public domain images of the Roosevelts throughout their respective lifetimes, as well as subject areas like the Great Depression, New Deal, and World War II. The FDR Library’s digital partner, Marist College, developed and implemented the underlying database infrastructure based on the Archon platform.

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December 4, 2013: The Polonsky Foundation Digitization Project is a joint effort of the Bodleian Libraries of the University of Oxford and the Biblioteca Apostolica Vaticana to make available important bibles and biblical texts from their collections. Over the course of the next four years, 1.5 million pages will be made freely available online to researchers. Hebrew manuscripts, Greek manuscripts, and early printed books have been selected for inclusion by a team of scholars and curators from around the world. The website, launched December 2, features zoomable images that enable detailed scholarly analysis and study. It also includes essays and video presentations made by scholars and supporters, including the Archbishop of Canterbury and Archbishop Jean-Louis Bruguès. Watch the video (2:26).

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November 27, 2013: Propaganda Posters,a new digital collection at Washington State University Libraries in Pullman, shows how propaganda posters (or “weapons on the wall”) helped governments influence citizens’ public and private behavior and decisions during World Wars I and II. The collection features roughly 520 images of posters made between 1914 and 1945. Posters strengthened public support for the wars by providing “message control” about the government’s allies and enemies.

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November 20, 2013: The John F. Kennedy Memorial Collection, part of the Portal to Texas History administered by the University of North Texas, features 11,406 pages of investigative materials from the Dallas Police Department’s extensive investigation of the JFK assassination currently housed at the Dallas Municipal Archives. The UNT Libraries’ Digital Project Unit received a $21,945 TexTreasures grant from the Texas State Library and Archives Commission to digitize these materials. The Sixth Floor Museum at Dealey Plaza contributed more than 400 black-and-white news images taken by the Dallas Times Herald’s photographers that document the events surrounding the assassination and four handwritten journals from jurors who sat on the Jack Ruby trial.

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November 13, 2013: The Southeast Asia Digital Library, administered by Northern Illinois University Libraries, provides educators, students, scholars, and members of the public with a wide variety of materials published or otherwise produced in Southeast Asia. Drawn largely from the collections of universities and individual scholars in this region, SEADL contains digital facsimiles of books and manuscripts, as well as multimedia materials and searchable indexes of additional Southeast Asian resources. Nations represented in the collection include Brunei, Cambodia, East Timor, Indonesia, Laos, Malaysia, Myanmar, the Philippines, Singapore, Thailand, and Vietnam.

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November 6, 2013: The Acoustic Atlas is a new initiative by Montana State University to collect the sounds of the animals and natural environments of Montana and the American West, including the snorts of bison in Yellowstone National Park, the howls of grasshopper mice, and the underwater calls of frogs. In its first stage, the website highlights selected recordings and features from MSU’s growing collection. As the project develops, the site will fill gaps in available recordings of regional species and will serve as a digital repository for bioacoustic and soundscape research.

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October 30, 2013: Allied Posters of World War I is a collection of more than 1,500 posters in Temple University Libraries’ Special Collections Research Center that was donated by George F. Tyler in 1937. The posters provide a graphic portrayal of Allied propaganda used to educate the public and enlist support for the war effort. In addition, they serve as examples of the art, design, and printing techniques of the period.

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October 16, 2013: Looking Back: The Civil War in Tennessee, a project of the Tennessee State Library and Archives, is part of the commemoration of the 150th anniversary of the Civil War. Archivists are digitizing relevant 

records and artifacts from private owners in all 95 counties in the state. Assistant State Archivist Wayne Moore said “the quality of the photographs, documents, and artifacts that people are bringing out is just extraordinary. No other state has done a Civil War digitization project on this scale to create an important legacy for future generations of students and Civil War scholars.”

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October 9, 2013: Baylor University’s JFK research collection consists of original materials related to the assassination of President John F. Kennedy in Dallas on November 22, 1963. Held by Baylor’s W. R. Poage Legislative  Library, the collection includes copies of Robert Bradley Cutler’s Grassy Knoll Gazette (1977–1996); assassination-related images from the Jack D. White Slide Collection; documents from the research files of John Armstrong, author of Harvey and Lee (2003); accounts of the assassination from US newspapers of the time; photos collected by researcher William Penn Jones Jr. and a complete run of his newsletter, The Continuing Inquiry; and other materials related to the life and legacy of JFK.

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October 2, 2013: The National Library of the Netherlands (KB) has partnered with Google to digitize some 160,000 books from its collection, which includes historical, scientific, cultural, and legal publications from 1700 to 1870. The agreement between the KB and Google is part of the library’s strategy to digitize all its public- domain books, periodicals, and newspapers published since 1470. About 80,000 titles are now done, and scanning will continue over the next several years.

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September 25, 2013: The Association for Cultural Equity Research Center has made available online its massive collection of folklorist Alan Lomax’s material. Lomax spent his career documenting folk music traditions from around the world. The archive includes more than 17,400 digital audio files, beginning with his first recordings onto (newly invented) tape in 1946 and tracing his career into the 1990s. It also includes photographs, stories, video recordings, lectures, jokes, sermons, personal narratives, interviews conducted by Lomax and his associates, and unique ambient artifacts captured in transit from radio broadcasts. The material is all from Lomax’s independent archive, begun in 1946 and is distinct from the thousands of earlier recordings on acetate and aluminum discs he made from 1933 to 1942 under the auspices of the Library of Congress.

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September 18, 2013: The Hawaii State Archives Digital Collections offer a broad and representative sampling of Hawaii’s extraordinary history. Collections include photographs, genealogy indexes, passenger manifests, tax ledgers, and World War I service records. The records are a combination of English and native  Hawaiian. There is a master Name Search for searching across multiple collections.

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September 11, 2013: The Illinois Digital Archives was created in 2000 as a repository for the digital collections of the Illinois State Library and other libraries and cultural institutions in Illinois. The IDA includes photographs, manuscripts, oral histories, government documents, postcards, posters, videos, newspapers, and maps. Its many collections cover Abraham Lincoln, the Illinois State Fair, Art Institute of Chicago exhibition catalogs, local histories, highway maps, O’Hare Airport, World War II, and the Chicago Botanic Garden.

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September 4, 2013: The Civil War on the Western Border, hosted by the Kansas City (Mo.) Public Library, engages Civil War buffs, scholars, and students in research and discussion on the Missouri-Kansas Border War that shook the region from 1854 to 1865. Through a collaborative effort among libraries, museums, and historical societies across the greater Kansas City region, the project provides free access to selected primary source materials and adds unique interactive features and a thematic layer of original scholarly essays and topical encyclopedia entries. The project is made possible by generous grant funding from the Missouri State Library as a part of its collaborative statewide Missouri Digital Heritage initiative.

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August 21, 2013: The Pritzker Military Library in Chicago is a nonpartisan research library founded in 2003 that attempts to increase the public understanding of military history and the sacrifices made by the men and women who have served. Its digital collections include maps, posters and prints, photos and negatives, regalia and artifacts, rare periodicals, and manuscripts and documents.

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August 14, 2013: The WSLS-TV News Film Collection is the result of a five-year effort by the University of Virginia Library to preserve what is believed to be the only surviving TV news archive of original film clips from Virginia’s civil rights era. In 2007, WSLS-TV of Roanoke, Virginia, gave news film and scripts from their broadcasts to the University of Virginia Library for preservation and use. The resulting collection spans 1951 to 1971 and comprises approximately 13,000 clips of 16mm film shown during news programs. It also contains roughly 18,000 pages of the accompanying scripts read on air by anchorpersons. Content of the news stories varies greatly from soapbox derbies to civil rights demonstrations. Local affairs and politics, sports, community events and social occasions, and personalities of the Roanoke region constitute the bulk of the collection. Each news story is searchable by both free-text keywords and controlled subject terms.

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August 7, 2013: The Ball State University Digital Media Repository in Muncie, Indiana, provides online access to a variety of primary source materials, including photographs, oral history interviews, artwork, video and  film footage, cartographic resources, architectural drawings, publications, and 3-dimensional objects. The repository, a collaborative project of the BSU libraries, offers collections in African-American studies, apparel and accessories, architecture, education, fine arts, maps, journalism, local history, and military history.

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July 31, 2013: New York Heritage, a project of the New York 3Rs Association, is a research portal for students, educators, historians, genealogists, and anyone else who is interested in learning more about the people, places, and institutions of New York State. The site provides free access to more than 170 distinct digital collections, totaling hundreds of thousands of items. The collections in New York Heritage represent a broad range of historical, scholarly, and cultural materials held in libraries, museums, and archives throughout the state. Collection items include photographs, letters, diaries, directories, maps, newspapers, and books. The collection is part of the New York State Board of Regent’s New York Digital Collection Initiative.

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July 24, 2013: The Culinary Institute of America Collection is one of dozens of digital collections housed on the Hudson River Valley Heritage website. The institute recently uploaded a collection of menus from its restaurants dating back to 1961; historical menus from around the world will be added soon. HRVH provides access to historical materials from digital collections contributed by colleges, libraries, archives, historical societies, museums and cultural organizations from the following counties in New York State: Columbia, Greene, Dutchess, Ulster, Sullivan, Rockland, Orange, Putnam, and Westchester.

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July 17, 2013: The Gordon M. Gee Botanical Illustrations Collection at Christchurch City Libraries in New Zealand showcases the work of Gordon Gee, who for 18 years worked at the Christchurch Botanic Gardens as a sign writer. His illustrations were used in Lawrence Metcalf’s Cultivation of New Zealand Trees and Shrubs, first published in 1972.

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July 10, 2013: The Bodleian Libraries Art Collection. The Bodleian Libraries, in the University of Oxford, form the largest university library system in the United Kingdom. In addition to holding the country’s second- largest collection of books and manuscripts, the Bodleian also has over 300 oil paintings, mainly portraits of sitters who have worked in or made contributions to the library or the university. The Bodleian began acquiring its portraits, mostly donated or bequeathed, soon after opening in 1602, and it displayed them in England’s first public gallery. Now 322 of the paintings are viewable on this website hosted by the BBC.

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June 26, 2013: The Ryerson and Burnham Archives of the Art Institute of Chicago collects artists’ and architects’ papers that complement and extend the permanent collections of the museum’s curatorial departments. The Archives collections are notably strong in late 19th- and 20th-century American architecture, with particular depth in Midwest, Chicago School, Prairie School, and organic architecture. Architects such as Edward Bennett, Daniel Burnham, Bruce Goff, Bertrand Goldberg, Ludwig Hilberseimer, Mies van der Rohe, Louis Sullivan, and Frank Lloyd Wright, and events such as the World’s Columbian Exposition of 1893 and the 1933 Century of Progress International Exposition are represented in a broad range of graphic and textual records. The Archives also houses the papers of artists, designers, and scholars such as Ivan Albright, Irving Penn, André Mellerio, and Richard Ten Eyck.

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June 19, 2013: The Indianapolis Motor Speedway Collection, a collaboration of the Speedway and the Indiana University– Purdue University Indianapolis Library, captures racing history through more than 14,000 images. The collection features highlights from the Speedway’s 114-year history with photographs dating from  1879 to 1997. Some of the highlights include the very first public event at the Speedway, the 1909 US National Balloon Championship. Other historic moments represented in the collection are the 1909 motorcycle race, dominated by “Cannonball” Baker, and the first Indianapolis 500 Mile Race in 1911.

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June 12, 2013:  What tends to be 3.5 inches tall and 10 inches long? Postcards created in a panoramic view format. More than 400 oversize panoramic postcards have been added to the Library of Congress Prints and Photographs online catalog. The library received most of the postcards as copyright deposits in 1905–1909. Thirty-nine different states are represented.

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June 5, 2013: The Northwest Historical Postcards Collection displays unique and engaging images of people and places in the states of Washington, Oregon, Idaho, Montana, and Wyoming, and the Canadian provinces of British Columbia and Alberta. Created by the University of Idaho Library’s Digital Initiatives Department, the collection consists of more than 800 digitized postcards featuring images of the late 19th and early to mid-20th century. The postcards, which were given to the library by a wide variety of donors, come from the historical photograph collections housed in the library’s Special Collections Department.

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May 29, 2013: Villanova University’s Dime Novel and Popular Literature digital collection brings together pre-Pulp Era tales that depict scenes of early America, the frontier, and the West. Ranging roughly from 1860 to 1930, these often serial publications recorded the attitudes prevailing in 19th- and early 20th-century society, including racist, sexist, and ethnic stereotypes. The original works are often extremely fragile. The full-text collection encompasses the precursors to Dime Novels, known as “Story Papers,” which were often larger in format, as well as the United Kingdom variety called “Penny Dreadfuls.” Also included are examples of nonfiction mass market literature on a variety of topics, including self-help and how-to titles and tracts on medical cures.

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May 22, 2013: The Balboa Park Commons contains more than 20,000 rare and significant materials from the museums in Balboa Park, San Diego. Launched on May 7, the online resource offers access to photos and artifacts from Mingei International Museum, the Museum of Photographic Arts, San Diego Air and Space Museum, San Diego Museum of Man, San Diego Natural History Museum, the San Diego Museum of Art, and Timken Museum of Art. The Balboa Park Online Collaborative is also hoping to add more San Diego-based cultural institutions to their roster in the future.

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May 15, 2013: Austrian Books Online is a joint project of the Austrian National Library and Google, which has digitized some 100,000 of the library’s public-domain holdings since 2010. These books can now be downloaded, read online, and searched free of charge with the help of the library’s online catalog. Some 600,000 books will ultimately become available. One treasure is the Kronyka Czeská, 1541, by Jan Severýn and Ondřej Kubeš of Žepův, based in large part on old legends and tales of the land by the ancestors Čech (644) up to the coronation of Ferdinand I of Habsburg in 1526. Another is a 1774 edition of Johann Wolfgang von Goethe’s The Sorrows of Young Werther.

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May 8, 2013: The Biblioteca Digital Hispánica collection is an online resource from the National Library of Spain in Madrid, which provides free access to thousands of digitized documents. Included are thousands of books, documents, maps, and manuscripts in the areas of travel, Miguel de Cervantes and Don Quixote, 18th-century architecture and decoration, holidays and celebrations, drawings and prints by Goya and Dürer, advertising, philosophy, history of science, and spiritualism and the occult.

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May 2, 2013: The Historic Mexican and Mexican American Press collection at the University of Arizona documents and showcases 20 historic Mexican and Mexican American publications published in Tuscon, El Paso, Los Angeles, San Francisco, and Sonora, Mexico, from the mid  1800s to the 1970s.  The collection covers important periods in Mexican-American history, from the Mexican Revolution to the Bracero Program and the Chicano Movement.  Highlights of the collection include: La Estrella de Occidente, a state-run Mexican newspaper that is the earliest publication in the collection from 1855; El Tusconense, the longest-running Spanish-language newspaper in Tuscon; El Independente, a student-produced newspaper serving South Tuscon and published since 1976 by the UA School of Journalism; and El Pueblo, a weekly newspaper in Spanish and English published in Tuscon from 1968 to 1969.      

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April 24, 2013: The Digital Public Library of America, launched on April 18, offers a single point of access to millions of items—photographs, manuscripts, books, sounds, and moving images—from libraries, archives, and museums around the United States. Users can browse and search the DPLA’s collections by timeline, map, format, and topic; save items to customized lists; and share lists with others. Users can also explore digital exhibitions curated by the DPLA’s content partners and staff. The DPLA is funded by grants from a number of foundations and government agencies. Each metadata record in the DPLA contains a link to the digital object on the content provider’s website. Digital copies of some objects are available for download, based on the content provider and the individual rights status of the object.

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April 17, 2013: The California Digital Newspaper Collection contains more than 400,000 pages of significant historical California newspapers published from 1846 to 1922, including the first California newspaper, The Californian, and the first daily California newspaper, The Daily Alta California. It also contains issues of several current California newspapers that are part of a pilot project to preserve and provide access to contemporary papers. A calendar showing available issues can be found by selecting the Search Newspapers button on the left and then selecting Titles from the menu bar. The site is a project of the Center for Bibliographical Studies and Research at the University of California, Riverside.

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April 10, 2013: Menus: The Art of Dining. The Special Collections department at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas, has built a strong local and regional culinary collection, adding menus from Las Vegas and Nevada restaurants as well as menus from winners of the National Restaurant Association’s “Menu Idea Exchange” and from recognized award-winning restaurants across the country. The UNLV Menu Collection reflects a wide spectrum of dining including: dining on trains and ships, gourmet restaurants and notable hotels, and special events and holidays. Many of the menus are made in a variety of special constructions, with interesting graphic elements and exotic and unusual materials. The majority of menus selected for this digital project came from the Bohn-Bettoni Collection, which consists of approximately 2,000 restaurant menus dating from 1870 to 1930.

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April 3, 2013: Gallica is the digital library of the Bibliothèque nationale de France (the National Library of France), open to the general public since 1997. It serves as a digital encyclopedia and consists of printed materials (books, journals, newspapers, printed music, and other documents), graphic materials (engravings, maps, photographs, and others), and sound recordings. Gallica makes it possible to find sources that are rare, unusual, out-of-print, or difficult, if not impossible, to access. These materials are royalty-free and available free of charge when used strictly for private purposes. Today, this digital library includes 2.4 million documents, 439,000 books, 62,000 maps, 762,000 images, and 2,600 sound recordings. Watch the Gallica blogfor collection updates.

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March 27, 2013: The Los Angeles County Museum of Art has added a total of 20,000 high-resolution images of artworks from its collection (up from 2,000 in 2011) that are available to download and use as you see fit (that’s about a quarter of all the art represented on the site). Look for the “download” option beneath the photo of the artwork. If you want to see all of the public domain art in the collection, run a search and select “Show only unrestricted images” at the top of the page.) An “On View” feature allows you to select a location in the museum (Japanese art) and view all of the database results that are in that location. You can also save your favorite records in one place by selecting “My Gallery” beneath any image; you will be prompted for a simple login username and password. Once you’ve registered, you can save your favorites for future reference. You can even add comments, and help us tag the collection to make search smarter and more responsive to the way the public uses the site.

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March 20, 2013: The Revs Digital Library is a large and varied collection of automotive materials owned by the Revs Institute in Naples, Florida. It includes images, research books, ephemera, and specialized documents. The Revs Program at Stanford University is digitizing these materials to ensure they are indexed, preserved, and made available to library patrons, researchers, and the general public. The Revs Digital Library is built on top of the Stanford Digital Repository to provide a web-based platform for discovery of automotive research and images. The digital library is developed in Ruby on Rails using open source technologies, including Blacklight, Hydra, and Fedora Commons. It will allow for metadata editing and provide community features and tools for researchers to further utilize the data.

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March 13, 2013: Brooklyn Visual Heritage provides access to a newly digitized corpus of 19th- and 20th-century photographs and other visual materials drawn from the rich collections of the Brooklyn Historical Society, Brooklyn  Museum, and the Brooklyn Public Library. The digitization and the design of the website were accomplished through Project CHART, a collaborative partnership with the Pratt School of Information and Library Science. This new online resource is intended to serve scholars, historians, and the general public.

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March 6, 2013: Latin American Pamphlet Digital Collection. Harvard’s Widener Library is the repository of many scarce or unique Latin American pamphlets published during the 19th and the early 20th centuries. One of the few institutions to have consistently collected Latin American pamphlets, Harvard has benefited from collections formed by Luis Montt (Chile), Nicolás Acosta (Bolivia), Manuel Segundo Sánchez (Venezuela), José Augusto Escoto (Cuba), Blas Garay (Paraguay), Charles Sumner, John B. Stetson, and others. Chile, Cuba, Bolivia, and Mexico are the countries most heavily represented in this collection. This collection of more than 5,000 titles was largely uncataloged and virtually inaccessible to researchers until a cataloging and digitization project was initiated in 2002.

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February 27, 2013: The Boston Athenæum’s collection of over 6,000 pieces of Confederate national and state currency provides a comprehensive look at historic pieces of Confederate currency and reveals interesting details about their design, production, and distribution. The collection contains examples of each type of currency from both the Confederacy and each state within the Confederacy. This cataloging, conservation, and digitization project was made possible through a generous gift from Caleb Loring Jr., a trustee emeritus of the Athenæum.

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February 20, 2013: The Florence Nightingale Letters Collection at the University of Illinois at Chicago highlights aspects of Nightingale’s work in the fields of nursing and medical sanitation throughout her life. She developed a model of statistical gathering and reporting for medical data, distinguishing herself as a professional statistician. The correspondences exemplify her engagement in policy matters as well as her leadership. Many letters appear on black-bordered mourning stationery. Dr. Karl A Meyer accumulated the letters in this collection, later donating them to the Cook County School of Nursing. The Special Collections Department of the University of Illinois at Chicago acquired the collection in 2000.

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February 13, 2013: The Anthropology Photographic Archivedatabase contains images from the anthropology collections of the University of Auckland, New Zealand. The images record staff research in New Zealand and the Pacific Islands in the field of archaeology and social anthropology from 1950 to date. At present approximately 50,000 images have been digitized and uploaded, ranging from social anthropology in Papua New Guinea and Tokelau, to archaeology in Western Samoa, Tonga, and New Zealand. The archive is a joint project between the University Library and the Department of Anthropology to preserve and ensure long-term access to items in this valuable and unique research archive.

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February 6, 2013: The Digital Scriptorium is a growing image database of medieval and Renaissance manuscripts that unites scattered resources from many institutions into an international tool for teaching and scholarly research. With technical support provided by the University of California, Berkeley library, DS allows scholars to verify cataloging information about places and dates of origin, scripts, artists, and quality. Special emphasis is placed on the touchstone materials: manuscripts signed and dated by their scribes. DS records manuscripts that traditionally would have been unlikely candidates for reproduction. It fosters public viewing of materials otherwise available only within libraries.

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January 30, 2013: The Macaulay Library Archive at the Cornell Lab of Ornithology in Ithaca, New York, has completed a 12-year project to digitize its entire collection of archived analog recordings. The collection, which dates back to 1929, contains nearly 150,000 audio recordings equaling more than 10 terabytes of data. About 9,000 species are represented in the collection. There is an emphasis on birds, but the collection also includes sounds made by whales, elephants, frogs, primates, and other animals. Searches can be done by common name,although advanced users can also browse by taxonomy. Although you can listen to the audio files for free, it’s not yet possible to download and save individual sound files. The collection has some videos available, such as this footage of a Pileated Woodpeckerfeeding its young and underwater views of a Green Turtle. It also has some free audio and video digital guides, including a “Bird Songs of Florida Sampler,” “Voices of Eastern Backyard Birds,” and “Voices of Western Backyard Birds.”

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January 23, 2013: The University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology in Philadelphia has collected around one million objects since its founding in 1887, many obtained directly through its own field excavations or anthropological research. Currently the online database contains more than 329,000 object records representing 665,000 objects with 67,000 images illustrating 25,200 items. Based on current workflows, the museum expects the number of object records to increase by roughly 3,000 records every six months, with an additional 8,500 object photographs added as well.

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January 16, 2013: The Cambridge Digital Library, University of Cambridge, UK, is an ongoing project to digitize the treasures held by the university library. The first phase of the work is the Foundations Project, which runs from mid-2010 to early 2014 and was made possible through a gift by Leonard Polonsky. This generous support will enable the library to develop its technical infrastructure and create significant content in the areas of faith and science, two areas of particular strength within the collections. The Foundations of Faith Collections will include important works from many religious traditions, particularly Judaism, Islam, Christianity, and Buddhism. They include some of the earliest Qur’anic fragments on parchment, the first known Qur’anic commentary written in Persian, an important selection of devotional works and mystical treatises, and an outstanding collection of theological works including the unique extant copy of the Kitāb al-Tawhīd by al-Māturīdī. The Foundations of Science Collection will focus on original scientific manuscripts, beginning with the papers of Isaac Newton and his contemporaries.

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January 9, 2013: The Lincoln Financial Foundation Collection, housed at the Allen County Public Library in Fort Wayne, Indiana, contains 20,000 rare Abraham Lincoln family photographs, letters, broadsides, newspapers, textiles, and election tickets. Curated Groupings are featured on topics ranging from Lincoln’s family life in Illinois to the Emancipation Proclamation. Family photographs from the collection can be seen in Steven Spielberg’s 2012 film, Lincoln, and the Allen County Public Library received acknowledgement in the film’s credits. The collection website receives more than 30,000 visits per month, and tours of the vault are available to library visitors. The collection is owned by the State of Indiana; the Indiana State Museum in Indianapolis holds the fine art, sculpture, prints and engravings, sheet music, and three-dimensional artifacts.

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December 19, 2012: The beta version of the Deutsche Digitale Bibliothek (German Digital Library) launched on November 28. Its goal is to offer the public unrestricted access to Germany’s cultural and scientific heritage, which includes access to millions of books, archived items, images, sculptures, pieces of music and other sound documents, as well as films and scores from all over the country. More than 1,880 institutions are contributing digital resources to the project, which currently offers some 5.6 million items. The German federal government contributed 8 million euros to developing infrastructure, and federal, state, and local authorities have guaranteed an annual operational budget of 2.6 million euros for five years.

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December 12, 2012: The University of Southern California Digital Library is now providing improved search and discovery tools to help the USC community integrate digital collections more easily into teaching, learning, and research. New and upgraded research capabilities include fully searchable text for every page of every document, supplementing the metadata developed by the libraries to describe content. A more powerful document-viewing tool reveals details—such as names on street signs and words on billboards—that previously were inaccessible to researchers. The new Digital Library also offers improved engagement tools, including a system for creating individualized collections of materials that are relevant to specific papers or courses, as well as easier integration with social media services, such as Facebook and Pinterest. Its collections include early photos of Southern California, early-20th-century Russian satirical journals, and photographs from the archives of the Los Angeles Examiner.

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December 5, 2012: The Trials Pamphlet Collection at the Cornell University Law Library consists of pamphlets ranging in date from the late 1600s to the late 1800s. Trial pamphlets are contemporary accounts of trials that involved prominent citizens or that dealt with especially controversial or lurid  topics. These pamphlets were produced quickly and inexpensively, and then sold on the street soon after the trial to a mass audience. The collection contains a wealth of information about the daily lives of ordinary people of the period, with a special focus on the treatment of women and minorities. Because cases were not officially reported on until the 1830s, the collection is one of the few ways to research trials from the 18th and early 19th centuries. The collection includes pamphlets from John Brown’s trial for his raid on Harpers Ferry in 1859, the trial of the Lincoln assassination conspirators, the impeachment trial of President Andrew Johnson, and Lizzie Borden’s trial for her parents’ murders.

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November 28, 2012: The Fairman Rogers Collection at the University of Pennsylvania consists of 1,054 rare volumes from the personal library of Fairman Rogers (1833–1900). A Penn alumnus, Rogers was cofounder of the School of Veterinary Medicine, professor of civil engineering, and an internationally recognized horseman. The materials, primarily published in the 19th century, with some imprints dating to the 16th century, bring together Rogers’s interest in horses and their relationship to engineering, veterinary medicine, science, and the history of industrialization. Comprised of medical guides, stud books, books on shoeing, harnessing, training, riding, driving, racing, keeping a proper stable, and breeds and breeding, the collection serves as a foundation for the scholarly study of the role of the horse in the technical, scientific, and social evolution of 19th-century European and North American history.

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November 21, 2012: The Tennessee Virtual Archive is a project of the Tennessee State Library and Archives to digitize and make available online items from its physical collections.  TeVA provides a searchable array of historial records, photographs, documents, maps, postcards, film, audio, and other original materials of enduring value.  Collections include the Earl S. Miers Photographs Collectioncivil war soldier photographspostcards of Tennessee, the Ryman Auditorium building in Nashville, the Alvin C. York collection, Tennessee arts and crafts, and the Civilian Conservation Corps.

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November 14, 2012: Cornell University’s Political Americana Collection consists of approximately 5,500 presidential promotional and commemorative items dating from 1789 to 1980. The collection contains political materials in a variety of formats, including cartoons, prints, and posters; lapel buttons, ribbons, textiles, hats, and other costume items; ballots, broadsides, leaflets, and other ephemera; pamphlets and other formal publications; sheet music and songbooks; and a variety of three-dimensional items. The majority of the collection was donated to Cornell by private collector Susan H. Douglas between 1957 and 1961. Elections from 1832 to 1960 are particularly well represented.

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November 7, 2012: The Margaret Herrick Library Digital Collections is an online database that launched in July 2012 and provides public access to digitized materials from the collections of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences’ Margaret Herrick Library, located at the Fairbanks Center for Motion Picture Study in Beverly Hills, California. Currently the database contains more than 3,000 items, including correspondence, photographs, early release fliers, full issues of rare periodicals, and movie star ephemera. The database also has complete copies of more than 250 Academy publications, dating back to the founding of the organization in 1927. Special collections within the digital library include an Academy Awards collection, the George Cukor papers, Cecil B. DeMille photographs, the Alfred Hitchcock papers, the Mary Pickford papers, and a sheet music collection. The library uses OCLC’s CONTENTdm Digital Collection Management Software.

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October 31, 2012: The Ralston Crawford Collection of Jazz Photography at Tulane University comprises some 800 black-and-white documentary photographs by Canadian-born painter, lithographer, and photographer Ralston Crawford (1906–1978), culled from his New Orleans work. Enamored of New Orleans music and culture, Crawford often made field trips to the city between the late 1940s and the early 1960s, photographing second-line parades, funerals with music, church services, night clubs, streetscapes, and signage as well as portraits of local musicians and bands.

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October 24, 2012: The University of Washington’s Historical Children’s Literature Collection chronicles by example the history of educational practice and reading, the changing perceptions of gender, race, and class, and the role of religion in teaching. Both European and American books and other materials from the 18th to the 20th century are represented in this collection and are browsable by category. This digital collection was created with the CONTENTdm software’s innovative program, JPEG 2000, which enables finely detailed materials to be displayed in a higher quality, more usable online format. It allows viewers to see image details that would be difficult or impossible to see at lower resolutions.

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October 17, 2012: Digibaeck consists of the entire archive of the Leo Baeck Institute, a New York research library and archive devoted to documenting the history of German-speaking Jewry. The digital library launched October 16 and provides free online access to primary-source materials encompassing five centuries of Jewish life in Central Europe. The collection includes 3.5 million pages of material ranging from the personal papers and photographs of Albert Einstein and Moses Mendelssohn to letters, diaries, recipes, and other ephemera chronicling the lives of everyday people. In addition to documents in German and other languages the collection includes many English translations. The institute formed a partnership with the Internet Archive on the project.

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October 11, 2012: Trove is the National Library of Australia’s discovery experience focused on Australia and Australians. It is a search engine that contains links to more than 311 million books, articles, photos, objects, newspapers, maps, music, diaries, letters, archives, people, organizations, and archived websites. Based on Picture Australia that the National Library launched in 2000, Trove has evolved into a centralized national service built with the collaboration of major libraries of Australia. One remarkable feature of the search engine is that it allows users to search the database of digitized newspapers from 1803 to 1954, which are now free of copyright. Users are encouraged to register for a free account, which enables them to correct any scanning errors they discover.

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October 3, 2012: Amtrak launched a digital library in 2012 that provides a place to share its history. The site features a collection of historic photographs, ads, route guides, timetable covers, and other resources from employees that celebrate Amtrak’s more than 40 years as the US intercity passenger rail provider. It also offers a blog that looks at recently uploaded items. The digital and physical archives were compiled and organized with the assistance of the Special Collections Research Center at George Washington University.

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September 26, 2012: The Photographic Archive of the American Academy in Rome consists of several valuable and specialized collections of photographs on archaeology, architecture, and art, as well as landscape architecture and gardens. It also includes special collections  important to the history of the Academy.

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September 19, 2012: Beyond Ricci is a digital library that introduces readers to the Jesuitana Collection at the Burns Library, Boston College, by highlighting books written about China by Jesuit missionaries. The Jesuitana Collection is broader than this (with more than 2,500 volumes published by or about the Jesuits prior to the order’s suppression in 1773), but for the purposes of this website, the library has focused on east-west cultural exchange and interaction. It takes the life of legendary Jesuit missionary Matteo Ricci (1552–1610) as the primary starting point. The text was written by Fr. Jeremy Clarke, S.J., assistant professor in the Boston College History Department. He also selected all the images from various works in the Jesuitana collection (and other rare book collections) of Boston College. Burns Library staff provided help related to other aspects of the project.

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September 12, 2012: The Dibner Library of the History of Science and Technology is the Smithsonian’s collection of rare books and manuscripts relating to the history of science and technology. Contained in this world-class collection of 35,000 rare books and 2,000 manuscript groups are many of the most important works dating from the 15th to the 19th centuries in the history of science and technology. Its digital collections include portraits of men and women in science, rare books printed before 1501, original drawings of 16th-century machines for Agostino Ramalli’s Le diverse et artificiose machine (Paris, 1588), and the 200 books selected by Bern Dibner that were donated in 1976 as the most significant titles in the development of Western science and technology.

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September 5, 2012: The Nash Collection of Primates in Art and Illustration consists of digital images drawn from a variety of historical sources and reveals how nonhuman primates have been depicted over time. It includes examples of fine art, printed illustration, sculpture, and other media. The Nash Collection is a collaboration between Stephen Nash, scientific illustrator and adjunct associate professor at the State University of New York at Stony Brook, who compiled images for the collection, and staff of the Lawrence Jacobsen Library at the Wisconsin National Primate Research Center, University of Wisconsin–Madison, who added descriptions and metadata for each image.

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August 29, 2012: A Continent Divided: The US–Mexico War is a joint project of the Center for Greater Southwestern Studies and the Library at the University of Texas at Arlington. Initiated with a $10,000 start-up grant from UT Arlington’s College of Liberal Arts, A Continent Divided seeks to promote awareness of and scholarly activity in the US–Mexico War, a conflict which had enormous repercussions for both countries. It seeks to do so by drawing from the extensive holdings on the war in UT Arlington Library’s Special Collections. Now in its first phase, the project examines two events: the Battle of Monterrey and the Polkos Revolt. New topic units will go online as funding becomes available.

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August 22, 2012: The American Geographical Society Library Digital Photo Archive offers a selection of images from its extensive photographic holdings, housed at the University of Wisconsin–Milwaukee. The images were selected from several collections, including the American Geographical Society Library Print Collection, the Harrison Forman Collection, the Robert W. McColl Collection, the Bert Krawczyk Collection, the Edna Schaus Sorensen and Clarence W. Sorensen Collection, and the Helmut de Terra Collection. A recently completed NEH-funded grant allowed the AGS Library to preserve, scan, and create metadata for nearly 71,000 deteoriating nitrate negatives. The photos are categorized by region: Asia and the Middle East, Africa, North and Central America, South America, and Europe.

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August 15, 2012: The Buffalo Bill Historical Center in Cody, Wyoming, is a complex of museums displaying artifacts and art of the American West. Its McCracken Research Library has embarked on a digital initiative, contributing 20,000 images to the center’s website. Online visitors can search a suite of Wyoming photographic collections by Charles Belden and Jack Richard, and digital documents related to William F. “Buffalo Bill” Cody, Plains Indian tribal groups, firearms, Yellowstone National Park, and other Western themes.

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August 8, 2012: The Digital Library of South Dakota is a collaboration of the libraries of six Board of Regents colleges and universities in the state of South Dakota: Black Hills State University, Dakota State University, Dakota Wesleyan University, Northern State University, South Dakota School of Mines and Technology, South Dakota State University, and the University of South Dakota. The consortium has made a variety of unique collections digitally available, among them the 1972 Flood Collection, the George S. McGovern Collection, the USD and SDSU photo collections, and the Black Hills National Forest Collection.

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August 1, 2012: The University of New Hampshire Digital Collections contains digital versions of books, letters, photographs, and other items from the collections of the UNH Library. The focus of Digital Collections is the history of New Hampshire, its people, places, events, governance, and industries, including the history of UNH. Digital Collections also contains historic books on a variety of topics such as science, music, poetry, and fly-fishing.

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July 25, 2012: The Rollins College Digital Archives are designed to enhance public awareness and broaden users’ access to the unique historical materials in the Olin Library in Winter Park, Florida, and to promote the use of primary sources and support the teaching and learning at Rollins and in local communities. The project is funded by several rounds of Student-Faculty Collaborative Research Grants, and currently has six collections: Hamilton Holt, Faces of Rollins, Rollins Architecture and Landscape, Student Lives at Rollins, Treasures at Rollins Archives, and Winter Park and Florida. Through thousands of historical images and textual records, Rollins’ liberal arts heritage and its tradition of excellence, innovation, and community are vividly represented.

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July 18, 2012: The Frashers Fotos Picture Postcard Digital Collection at the Pomona (Calif.) Public Library is a selection of some 5,000 representative images from the library’s holdings of postcards published by Burton Frasher Sr. (1888–1955). A substantial portion of the collection consists of “Main Street” views of small southwestern towns and ghost towns that no longer exist or have changed dramatically since they were first photographed. For instance, the former gold-mining town of Bodie, California, now a state historic park, was a favorite subject for Frasher. His 1927 photos of the deserted town document buildings and structures that were mostly destroyed by fire in 1932. The collection also includes thousands of scenic views of the Southwest’s most imposing natural areas, including Bryce and Zion Canyons in Utah, Rocky Mountain National Park in Colorado, Carlsbad Caverns in New Mexico, the Grand Canyon in Arizona, Yosemite National Park, and most notably, Death Valley in California.

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July 12, 2012: CIRCLE offers users an accessible and accurate summary in English of letters that were issued under the great seal of Ireland and enrolled in the Irish chancery rolls between the reigns of Henry III and Henry VII. The digital library was officially launched on May 10, 2012, by the Provost of Trinity College Dublin, Patrick Prendergast. The records of the Irish chancery were destroyed during the Irish Civil War on June 30, 1922, in an explosion and fire in the Public Record Office of Ireland, located at the Four Courts, Dublin. Among the most important classes of record destroyed were the medieval Irish chancery rolls. CIRCLE is the culmination of nearly four decades of work reconstructing these lost records. It brings together all known letters enrolled on the Irish chancery rolls during the Middle Ages (1244–1509), drawing on originals, facsimiles, transcripts, and calendars located in archival repositories in the Republic of Ireland, Northern Ireland, England, and the US. The site contains over 20,000 Irish chancery letters translated from Latin into English, together with an unparalleled collection of digital images of surviving medieval chancery letters and rare printed volumes.

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July 5, 2012: The Folger Bindings Image Collection provides access to high-resolution images and descriptions of bindings from the rare book and manuscript collections of the Folger Shakespeare Library in Washington, D.C. Bindings are chosen from the collection for photography and description not only because of their decorative tooled elements but also for their physical features as functional objects and cultural artifacts. Recording information about binding structure and decoration can reveal items where the same or similar tools may have been used at different times by different binders or binding workshops. Users can show multiple images side-by-side, zoom in and out, view cataloging information when available, export thumbnails, and construct permanent URLs linking back to their favorite items or searches.

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June 20, 2012: A ghost sign is a painted advertisement on a building, most prominent prior to the 1930s. They are typically painted on brick buildings. People have begun to document these fading remnants of advertising in urban environments, and digital archives of ghost signs are building across the United States and beyond. The Ghost Signs of Louisville collection, a digital initiative of the University of Louisville Libraries, Kentucky, emerged from a partnership between the libraries and the Fine Arts department. Students in a documentary photography class in the fall of 2011 searched selected neighborhoods for ghost signs, photographed them, and recorded metadata about each image (PDF file). Of the 201 photographs submitted by the class, 122 were added to the digital collection. Library employees went out and photographed 22 additional images. This collection will continue to grow with future submissions.

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June 13, 2012: Washington County Heritage Online is a cooperative project of local libraries, museums, and cultural institutions in Washington County, Oregon. The WCHO aims to digitize and display items of historical and cultural importance; celebrate local history; encourage cooperation between archives, historical societies, libraries, museums, and other cultural organizations; and allow for wider access to the unique materials found in Washington County. Contributors are the Pacific University Library, the Washington County Museum, Tigard Public Library, and Centro Cultural.

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June 6, 2012: The Edgar J. Goodspeed Manuscript Collection at the University of Chicago Library comprises 68 early Greek, Syriac, Ethiopic, Armenian, Arabic, and Latin manuscripts ranging in date from the 5th to the 19th centuries. The acquisition of these hitherto unknown manuscripts was spearheaded by Edgar J. Goodspeed in the first half of the 20th century in order to support new scholarship in the humanities. With support from a grant from the Institute of Museum and Library Services, the library is creating a unique digital resource based on this collection. All 68 New Testament manuscripts and an additional 114 papyri fragments will be digitized in their entirety and presented with high-quality zoomable images through an interface that supports browsing within individual manuscripts and across the collection.

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May 30, 2012: Southern Methodist University’s six Central University Libraries in Dallas are expanding their digital collections, especially with photographs, manuscripts, imprints, and works of art pertaining to Texas and Texas history. Some recent projects are the Lawrence T. Jones III Texas Photographs that include towns throughout the state, Civil War soldiers, and a wide range of Texas citizens; the Rowe-Barr Collection of Texas Currency, representing thousands of notes, scrip, and bonds issued between the 1820s and 1935; and the Otis Dozier Sketchbooks, consisting of some 6,400 pages of drawings by Texas Regionalist artist Otis Dozier (1905–1987).

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May 23, 2012: The Royal Society Picture Library is an online database of digital images of paintings, drawings, and prints held in the collections of the Royal Society, the world’s oldest scientific academy. It has been created to inspire the exploration of science through its visual history. It contains portraits of some of the most eminent scientists, past and present, such as Isaac Newton, Christopher Wren, and Charles Darwin, including original oils, works on paper, miniatures, photographs, and engravings. Among its other features are drawings, sketches, and paintings from the Royal Society’s archive collections, including botanical studies, microscopic observations, anatomical drawings, engineering plans, and travel documentary photography; and images of rare published plates from the 16th to the 19th centuries, hand-picked from its extensive library of printed books and journals.

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May 16, 2012: The Boston Public Library has digitized thousands of old photographs of Fenway Park and the Red Sox. Many of the photos come from Leslie Jones, a sports photographer for the old Boston Herald Traveler newspaper. Others are from Michael “Nuf Ced” McGreevey, who owned what was thought to be the first sports bar in Boston. The images are brought together in the library’s online exhibit, Sports Temples of Boston.

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May 9, 2012: The Digital Collections at Missouri State University in Springfield offer a glimpse into the history of the Ozark region and of Missouri State University through thousands of images, documents, and film clips. These unique collections include the Birdle Mannon Collection, with artwork by a self-trained artist from the rural Ozarks; the Katherine Lederer Ozarks African American History Collection; the Lipman Family Collection, with materials from an early Jewish family in Springfield; St. Louis–San Francisco (“Frisco”) Railway Company materials (see squirrel above); the Shannon County Film Collection, with footage and interviews from the 1970s; and the university’s yearbook and student newspaper, covering 1909 to the present. Among the digital items is a collection of medieval manuscript pages ranging from the 14th to the 17th centuries.

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May 2, 2012: Pepperdine University Libraries’ latest digital collection is the Historic Sound Recordings collection featuring streaming recordings of memorable speeches and significant events that chart the history of Pepperdine University and Southern California. The collection includes archival recordings of political speeches and debates on morality, musical performances, and lectures on history. Prominent speakers include such national figures as Ronald Reagan, Milton Friedman, and singer Pat Boone.

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April 25, 2012: The Nelson Mandela Centre of Memory digital archive was launched in March 2012 to coincide with the 60th anniversary of the date the South African leader became an attorney. The website includes photos, videos, letters, and personal documents about Mandela’s life and times, with some archival data dating back to 1929. The project is a joint venture between the Nelson Mandela Centre of Memory in Houghton, South Africa, and the Google Cultural Institute.

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April 18, 2012: Egypt’s 21st Century Revolution Visual Art digital collection showcases artwork created by American University in Cairo students in response to the January 25, 2011, revolution that led to the ousting of former Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak. The collection is part of the university’s rare books and special collections digital library, which also include architectural drawings, photographs from the revolution, and video recordings. The image above is called “Freedom and Change.”

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April 12, 2012: The Osler Library Prints Collection at McGill University in Montreal brings together a rich variety of visual documents related to the history of medicine, spanning several centuries, countries, and artistic media. Ranging from the 17th to the 20th century, the collection consists predominantly of prints, though it also includes some photographs, drawings, posters, and cartoons. The images in this collection, acquired from various donors at different times, are fascinating for both their historical significance and their artistic merit. Straddling the disciplines of art and science, the collection is a valuable resource on the history of medicine and the history of portraiture.

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April 5, 2012: NGA Images, a new online resource that launched March 16, is a repository of digital images of the collections of the National Gallery of Art. On this website you can search, browse, share, and download images. A standards-based reproduction guide and a help section provide advice for both novices and experts. More than 20,000 open access digital images—up to 3,000 pixels each—are available free of charge for download and use. NGA Images is designed to facilitate learning, enrichment, enjoyment, and exploration.

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March 28, 2012: In honor of Maryland’s 378th birthday on March 25, 2012, the Enoch Pratt Free Library/State Library Resource Center in Baltimore has launched the new Maryland Digital Cultural Heritage website. The site showcases a digital collection of items from Maryland libraries, museums, historical societies, and other institutions, and includes more than 5,000 items, such as maps, manuscripts, photos, artwork, books, and other media.

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March 21, 2012: The broadest single collection of historical maps from around the world is now available online. Old Maps Online, described by its creators as like Google for old maps, will act as a central repository to a vast collection of maps held by institutions across the globe. The service, hosted by the University of Portsmouth in the UK, launched in late February with more than 60,000 maps, which will double in collection size by the end of 2012. The site incorporates access to collections at the British Library, the National Library of Scotland, the Moravian Library in the Czech Republic, and the David Rumsey Collection in California.

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March 16, 2012: The Queens Memory Project is a dynamic testament of collective memory for the residents of Queens, New York—the most diverse county in the United States. The interviews and archival records gathered here from many sources document the borough’s people and places; their differences, their changes over time, and their strong ties to one another. The project combines historical and contemporary photography, maps, news clippings, and other documents with oral history interviews of current residents. Among its goals are to record borough history as it happens and empower residents from all ethnicities and walks of life to document their lives in the borough.

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March 8, 2012: The Litchfield Collection on the History of Fatty Materials is part of the Hagley Digital Archives at the Hagley Museum and Library in Wilmington, Delaware. Most of the items in this collection relate to the advertising and production of soaps, oils, food products, and other consumer products. The image shown above is part of a group that showcases margarine-related items and includes information on other oils and fats, including photos of people making butter and workers processing olives into olive oil and preparing them for shipment.

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February 29, 2012: In keeping with the theme of the March/April American Libraries’ architectural issue, we present the Thomas MacLaren Collection of Architectural Drawings from the University of Colorado System and Auraria Higher Education Center. The collection of original pencil sketches and watercolors by Thomas MacLaren (born in Scotland, 1863; died Colorado Springs, 1928) illustrating the architecture of England, Italy, Scotland, and Switzerland predominantly between 1880 and 1891. The collection also includes some landscapes, student exercises, and miscellany.

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February 24, 2012: The Burgert Brothers Photographic Collection presents a pictorial record of the commercial, residential, and social growth of Tampa Bay and Florida’s west coast from the late 1800s to the early 1960s. Nearly 15,000 images in this collection chronicle the history of the Tampa Bay area as it faced wars, natural disasters, and economic booms and busts. The images offer a view of a community at work, from cigar factories, sponge docks, and strawberry fields to grocery stores, service stations, and bank lobbies. Many of the photographs also depict a community at leisure, enjoying a day at the beach, participating in local celebrations, attending the Florida State Fair, or playing games such as golf, tennis, shuffleboard, or checkers.

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February 17, 2012: The Calgary (Alberta) Public Library’s Community Heritage and Family History Digital Library contains thousands of digitized items related to Calgary and Alberta, including the newest collection, the Calgary Public Library Archives—Our Story in Pictures. In 2012, the library is celebrating 100 years of service and has added more than 3,000 photographs to this latest collection. The image above is from the Postcards from the Past collection and depicts a cowboy on a horse surrounded by wheat sheaves.

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February 3, 2012: Duke University’s Emergence of Advertising in America: 1850–1920 contains more than 9,000 images that illustrate the rise of consumer culture and the birth of a professionalized advertising industry in the United States. Duke Library’s earlier Ad*Access project similarly contains thousands of print advertisements from mainly US magazines and newspapers. Likewise, private collector Jay Paull, 42, began collecting vintage print ads as a child and has since amassed more than 10,000 American ads dating from the 1830s to the 1920s. Paull recently established a digital repository showcasing a diverse historical record of products, services, educational institutions, literature, art, communications, and various other aspects of American life.

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January 18, 2012: The Martin Luther King Jr. Center for Nonviolent Social Change in Atlanta has made available online 200,000 papers belonging to the civil rights leader—the first step to bringing more than one million documents to the web. The documents give you a good glimpse of Dr. King’s role as a scholar, father, pastor, and catalyst for change. Among the papers, you will find “speeches, telegrams, scribbled notes, patient admonitions, and urgent pleas.” Notable documents worth visiting include King’s 1964 Nobel Prize Acceptance Lecture, his Eulogy for the Four Girls Murdered in Birmingham (1963), and a draft of his world-changing “I Have a Dream” speech. Underwritten by J. P. Morgan Chase, the archive lets you navigate through documents by theme and by type of document. Or you can simply use a dedicated search engine.

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January 13, 2012: Southern California’s Azusa Pacific University’s Citrus Crate Label Collection consists of 300 bright and colorful citrus crate labels that were used by various California citrus growers. They represent locations in both Central and Southern California. These labels were used to identify and advertise the wooden crates of various fruits, such as grapefruit, lemons, and oranges, that were shipped throughout the United States.

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January 5, 2012: The Boston Public Library’s Print Department is home to more than 350 vintage travel posters, most dating from the 1920s to the 1940s, the “Golden Age of Travel.” Railways opened up America and Europe, luxe ocean liners introduced elegance into overseas voyages, and drivers took to the road in record numbers in their new automobiles. By the mid-1940s, new airlines crisscrossed the globe, winging adventure-seekers to far-flung destinations. Travel agents and ticket offices during this period were festooned with vivid, eye-catching posters, all designed to capture the beauty, excitement, and adventure of travel, and to promote a world of enticing destinations and new modes of transportation. Individual artists gained fame for their distinctive graphic styles and iconic imagery, and many posters from this era still remain important works of art long after their original advertising purposes have faded.

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December 14, 2011: The Theodore Roosevelt Center unveiled the Theodore Roosevelt Digital Collection December 8. Unlike modern presidents, Theodore Roosevelt does not have a presidential library. Instead, his personal and presidential papers are scattered in libraries and other sites across the United States. The mission of the TR Center, based at Dickinson State University in North Dakota, has been to gather and digitize copies of all Roosevelt-related items to make his legacy more readily accessible to scholars and schoolchildren, enthusiasts and interested citizens. Items in the digital library include correspondence to and from Roosevelt, diary entries, notes, political cartoons, scrapbooks, newspaper columns, and magazine articles by and about Roosevelt, speeches, and photographs. Users can also view film clips and listen to audio recordings.

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December 7, 2011: The Korean War Propaganda Leaflet Collection preserved at the North Dakota State University Institute for Regional Studies provides a unique look into an aspect of the war often overlooked. Based upon what President Truman called “the campaign of truth” these leaflets became one of the primary means of winning the hearts and minds of enemy troops and Korean civilians. This collection of over 600 leaflets was amassed by NDSU alumnus Albert G. Brauer, who served in the Eighth US Army in Korea as chief of the Projects Branch, Psychological Warfare Division, G3 Section (February 1951 to January 1952). Under his direction he transformed a small nucleus of relatively untrained personnel into an integrated team of writers, artists, and Asian language specialists of professional caliber who produced hundreds of propaganda leaflets and voice messages for dissemination by aircraft, artillery, and by air and ground loudspeaker units.

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November 30, 2011: The Media History Digital Library is a nonprofit initiative dedicated to digitizing collections of classic media periodicals that belong in the public domain for full public access. The project is supported by owners of materials who loan them for scanning and donors who contribute funds to cover the cost of scanning. It has scanned more than 200,000 pages. The collection features extensive runs of several trade publications, among them The Film Daily (1918–1936), International Photographer (1929–1941), Moving Picture World (1912-1918), and Photoplay (1917–1940).

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Byzantine Empire, Basil II, AV Tetarteron Nomisma. This coin was minted during Basil II's reign over the Byzantine Empire (976-1025 AD). On the obverse is a bust of Christ who is holding a cross with pellets, a book of the Gospels, and a raised right hand. The reverse shows a crowned bust of Basil, who has a short beard and is standing on the left side. His brother Constantine is also wearing a crown and is beardless. Constantine is standing on the right side, and the brothers hold a cross together

November 23, 2011: The Alwin C. Carus Coin Collection was donated to Hillsdale (Mich.) College by Alwin C. Carus of La Salle, Illinois. It is a large collection that contains a broad range of coins and currency, including coins from ancient Greece, Macedon, and Rome, medieval English coins, Byzantine coins, Islamic coins, Chinese coins and currency, United States coins, and coins from all over the world, including Australia, Brazil, Canada, France, Germany, Great Britain, India, Mexico, Russia, and many others.

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November 16, 2011: Europeana Collections 1914–1918: Remembering the First World War will encompass by 2014 (the centennial of the war’s outbreak) a substantial digital collection of material from national library collections of 10 libraries and other partners in eight countries that found themselves on different sides of the historic conflict. It is cofunded in the framework of the European Commission’s Competitiveness and Innovation Framework Programme (CIP). The three-year project will make more than 400,000 WWI sources publicly and freely available online for the first time—content that is often rare and highly fragile because of the deteriorating quality of the paper it was produced on and generally only accessible in reading rooms. The digital library officially started in May 2011 and will continue to add items through April 2014.

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November 9, 2011: The Nantucket (Mass.) Historical Association Research Library’s Historic Photograph Collections are the most complete visual record of the history of Nantucket Island in existence and consist of more than 50,000 images. Several thousand have now been scanned and individually cataloged into a database that is searchable online. 

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October 21st, 2011: Penn in Hand: Selected Manuscripts - Penn in Hand: Selected Manuscripts is the University of Pennsylvania’s collection of more than 1,400 online facsimiles of rare manuscripts from the 9th to the 19th century held in the Rare Book and Manuscript Library. A two-year grant funded by the National Endowment for the Humanities has allowed Penn to finish digitizing manuscripts produced prior to 1601; a second grant was secured in March to digitize manuscripts from 1601 to 1800. The collection also includes more than 100 facsimiles of the Lawrence J. Schoenberg Collection, a collection of late medieval and early modern manuscripts donated in April by 1953 College graduate and Wharton MBA recipient Lawrence Schoenberg.

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October 13th, 2011: Lincoln Highway Digital Image Collection - The Lincoln Highway Digital Image Collection is part of the University of Michigan Library’s Transportation History Collection and consists of the archive of the original Lincoln Highway Association (1910–1927). The association was made up of representatives from the automobile, tire, and cement industries, with the goal of planning, funding, constructing, and promoting the first transcontinental highway in North America. The route, consisting of both existing and newly built roads following the most direct route possible, ran from New York to San Francisco, covering approximately 3,400 miles. The digital collection consists of approximately 3,000 images, including views of construction underway, towns and cities, markers, bridges, cars, camp sites, scenic views, and snapshots of association directors and field secretaries traveling the route. The photographs were digitized from 1999 to 2007.
 
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October 5th, 2011: The Pasadena Digital History Collaboration is a consortium of cultural institutions in Pasadena, California. Its unites efforts to bring Pasadena history to life by preserving, documenting, and providing access to digitized historical materials through a single, open-access point for the public. The Pasadena Public Library, Pasadena Museum of History, Pasadena City College, and Huntington Library so far have placed more than 4,000 photographs and documents in the collection. n addition to a searchable database, the site features special collections on topics such as the Tournament of Roses and Busch Gardens, the sprawling former winter estate of brewing magnate Adolphus Busch. The group also uses Flickr to maintain a gallery of mystery photos, inviting the public to help date and identify them.
 
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September 28th, 2011: State Historical Society of North Dakota - The State Historical Society of North Dakota, as part of the Digital Horizons consortium, has included items from its photograph, film, publications, and map collections that document the history of both the state of North Dakota and the Northern Great Plains region.
 
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September 21st, 2011: Wish You Were Here: Saskatchewan Postcard Collections highlights more than 4,500 postcards found in 11 archives throughout the province of Saskatchewan. Hosted by the Saskatchewan Council for Archives and Archivists, the images found on the site are eclectic. No attempt was made to curate the cards or select thematically specific images. The postcards came to be in archival collections in a variety of ways. Some, sent to individuals in Saskatchewan, are part of larger archival groups; some were collected by individuals; others were collected by institutions for the images or text they presented. The only unifying theme of the exhibit is that all of the postcards now form part of Saskatchewan’s rich and diverse archival heritage.
 
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September 15th, 2011: Pennell Photography Collection - The Pennell Photography Collection at the University of Kansas Spencer Research Library in Lawrence consists of more than 30,000 glass plate negatives that represent the life work of Joseph J. Pennell, a successful commercial studio photographer who worked in Junction City, Kansas, from the early 1890s to the early 1920s. It offers a comprehensive view of life in a moderate-sized Midwestern army-post town on the Great Plains at the turn of the last century. The university acquired the negatives, along with 10 ledgers of business records, in 1950. Pennell’s novelist son, Joseph Stanley Pennell, was persuaded to donate them by KU faculty member Robert Taft, who selected 4,000 images that he considered significant, printed them, and prepared a traveling exhibition, which generated a great deal of interest. In 1983, with funding provided by NEH, the entire collection was surveyed, and additional images were printed and cataloged along with the images selected by Taft. It is this subset that is now viewable online.
 
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September 8th, 2011: Centennial of the Overseas Railway - The Centennial of the Overseas Railway, an extension of the Florida East Coast Railway that ran to Key West, is celebrated in this Flickr digital collection posted by the Monroe County (Fla.) Public Library. The railroad opened January 22, 1912, and operated until the Labor Day Hurricane of 1935. Built by oil and railroad magnate Henry Flagler, the railway cost more than $50 million and required many engineering innovations and vast amounts of labor. In 1912, a proud Flagler rode the first train into Key West aboard his private railcar, marking the completion of the railroad’s overseas connection to Key West and the linkage by railway of the entire east coast of Florida. It was widely known as the “Eighth Wonder of the World.”
 
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September 1st, 2011: Miniature Book Collection - The Miniature Book Collection in the University of North Texas Digital Library includes a selection of contemporary and historical miniature books selected from the larger collection in the UNT Libraries Rare Book Room. In some cases, only the covers have been digitized. The collection also contains issues of the Miniature Book News and the Miniature Book Society Newsletter. Miniature books are defined as those books under 4″ (3″ in some places) in height.
 
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August 18th, 2011: The University of Arkansas Library - The University of Arkansas Library in Fayetteville launched a digital collection August 9 documenting the life and work of Brooks Hays (1898–1981), a leading Democratic congressman from Arkansas’s Fifth District from 1942 to 1959. The collection, titled “Principles and Politics: Documenting the Career of Congressman Brooks Hays,” includes more than 170 items, including articles, campaign materials, cartoons and drawings, correspondence, diaries, photos, poems, prayers, and speeches. Special Collections Department Head Tom W. Dillard notes that Hays worked to mediate the escalating civil rights conflicts during the 1950s and refused to join Gov. Orval Faubus in his efforts to prevent the integration of Little Rock Central High School in 1957.
 
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August 4th, 2011: Indiana Memory - Indiana Memory is a collaborative effort to provide access to the wealth of primary sources in Indiana libraries, archives, museums, and other cultural institutions. It is a gateway to Indiana’s history and culture found in digitized books, manuscripts, photographs, newspapers, maps, and other media. As a portal to the collections, Indiana Memory assists individuals to locate materials relevant to their interests and to better appreciate the connections between those materials. This project is made possible through grant funding from the Institute of Museum and Library Services to the Indiana State Library. In July 2011, the National Endowment for the Humanities awarded a $293,157 grant to the Indiana State Library to digitize the state’s historically significant newspapers published between 1836 and 1922. The digitized papers will become available through Indiana Memory.
 
 
 
 

July 21st, 2011: International Jazz Collections - The International Jazz Collections is a notable group of digital libraries at the University of Idaho. The IJC features the papers, photographs, and videos of the legendary Lionel Hampton along with other jazz notables such as Leonard Feather, Lee Morse, Joe Williams, Dizzy Gillespie, Conte Candoli, and Al Grey. The archives are browsable by keyword and organized into individual collections.
 
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July 13th, 2011: Historic Recipe File - Historic Recipe File of the Milwaukee Public Library. From the 1960s through the 1980s, MPL librarians clipped recipes from the city’s two newspapers. Filed on index cards, they became a valuable database for reference librarians answering calls from the public. Those recipe cards have now become digital files in the library’s Historic Recipe File. Librarians Rebecca Desch and Rose Fortier decided that the long-forgotten-about recipe cards would make a great digital reference collection. To date, 530 recipe cards have been scanned into the database with the help of University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee student volunteers and are organized alphabetically by name, but are also searchable by keywords. Recipes are also searchable by such categories as desserts and appetizers. The collection was released on July 1 to coincide with National Culinary Arts Month. The website features a different recipe every day, often focusing on local delicacies like Moose Stroganoff and Wildburgers.
 
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June 24th, 2011: Waging Peace: Darfuri Children’s Drawings - Waging Peace: Darfuri Children’s Drawings are now available digitally through the University of South Florida’s Special Collections Coral System. In 2007, Waging Peace travelled to the refugee camps of eastern Chad to interview displaced Chadian and Darfuri refugees who had escaped the war in Sudan’s Darfur region. While there, the Waging Peace representatives gave paper, crayons, and pens to the children in the camps aged 6 to 18 years old. The children were then asked to draw their hopes for the future and their memories of the war. This collection includes 500 drawings, most of which depict what the children saw when their villages and home were attacked and destroyed by militia groups. In November 2007, the drawings were taken to the International Criminal Court in the Hague and were accepted by the court as contextual evidence of the crimes committed in Darfur by the government of Sudan and the Janjaweed militia group.
 
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June 16th, 2011: Lowcountry Digital Library - The Lowcountry Digital Library digitizes and makes accessible unique resources pertaining to the South Carolina coastal region. Contributing partners include the College of Charleston, the Medical University of South Carolina, the Citadel, and the Charleston County Public Library. Part of the South Carolina Digital Library, the LDL incorporates collections of photographs, postcards, artwork, manuscripts, railroad records, artifacts, scrapbooks, slave passes, family histories, and oral histories.
 
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June 8th, 2011: University of California, Santa Barbara Digital Library - The University of California, Santa Barbara Digital Library includes some 3,000 highlights from the large collection of historic photographs, recordings, and manuscripts in the Davidson Library’s Special Collections Department. “The library wanted to reveal its hidden collections and highlight its unique holdings,” explained Lisa Koch, UCSB metadata librarian. “The Digital Library is a resource for people who want to explore the materials but can’t come to the building. Scholars and users can view items at home, and teachers can bring the archives into their classrooms.” Among the highlights are photographs from Ghana, Britain, and Australia from 1910 to 1921; poster prints from contemporary San Francisco artists; picture discs from the 1940s; and artistic photographs of California and the United States from 1970 to 1990. Audio recordings include discussions and talks by famous political thinkers, such as Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. The recordings are drawn from the Center for the Study of Democratic Institutions Collection. Among other audio recordings in the Digital Library are 78 rpm Vogue picture discs from the Todd Collection.
 
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June 2nd, 2011: University of Missouri Digital Library - The University of Missouri Digital Library includes a collection of postcard images that show the development of Joplin, Missouri, from a scattering of rough mining camps through the mid-point of the 20th century. They provide an indelible image of a city that grew virtually overnight to become the world’s premier supplier of lead and zinc ore. Joplin also became a transportation hub and still retains the title of The Crossroads of America. In addition to pictures of mines and miners, there are images of Joplin’s extravagantly landscaped parks and public recreation areas as well as souvenir postcards of the motels and motor courts that sprang up along Route 66. Joplin’s place as the social mecca for the soldiers training at Camp Crowder during World War II is documented in postcards showing the USO club and other social and recreational venues. Joplin’s grandiose hotels, theaters, and apartment buildings are shown in their glory days. The postcards were selected primarily from the collections of the Joplin Public Library. The collection provides a close look at a city that has received much world attention since the disastrous tornado of May 22. The digital library also offers a booklet on the devastation wrought by the earlier Joplin tornado of May 5, 1971, and many other images and texts.
 
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May 26th, 2011: Medicine in the Americas - Medicine in the Americas is a digital resource of the National Library of Medicine that encompasses more than 300 early printed books from the United States, Latin America, the Caribbean, and Canada. The first round of digitized books, released May 23, includes monographs dating from 1610 to 1865. Additional titles, dating up to 1920 and drawing further upon NLM’s comprehensive collection of early American printed books, will be added on an ongoing basis. Medicine in the Americas will be of interest to scholars, educators, writers, students and others who wish to use primary historical materials to help expand knowledge of medical and public health history for the advancement of scholarship across the disciplines and for the education of the general public. Digital files created for Medicine in the Americas reside in NLM’s Digital Collections, a repository for access to and preservation of digitized biomedical resources. Digital Collections allows rich searching, browsing, and retrieval of monographs and films from NLM’s History of Medicine Division.
 
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May 19th, 2011: Yale University Digital Commons - The Yale University Digital Commons is now offering scholars, artists, and others free access to online images of millions of objects housed in Yale’s museums, archives, and libraries, thanks to a new open access policy announced May 10. More than 250,000 images are already available through a newly developed collective catalog that unites the collections of the university and allows discovery of related content held by different campus units. No license will be required for the transmission of the images and no limitations will be imposed on their use. The Yale treasures that are now accessible are as wide-ranging as the collections themselves and include such diverse items as a small limestone stela with hieroglyphic inscription from the Peabody Museum of Natural History, a Mozart sonata in the composer’s own hand from the Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library, a 15th-century Javanese gold kris handle from the Indo-Pacific collection of Yale University Art Gallery, and a watercolor by William Blake from the collection of prints and drawings in the Yale Center for British Art.
 
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May 12th, 2011: University of Oregon Historic Sheet Music - The University of Oregon Historic Sheet Music website provides a selection of more than 1,000 digital images from its collections of printed sheet music held by the Music Services Department and in the Oregon Collection of Special Collections and University Archives. Items currently available are the Oregon Music Collection, focusing on music by Oregonians or about Oregon events and places, and the Women Composers Collection, showing the strength of the collection in music by women composers.
 
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May 5th, 2011: Westchester County (N.Y.) Archives Digital Collections - The Westchester County (N.Y.) Archives Digital Collections were launched in April 2011 to provide widespread digital access to the unique public records stored in its archival vaults. More than 9,000 historical photographs and maps from the county’s extensive archives are now accessible, thanks to a New York State Archives’ Local Government Records Management Improvement Fund grant and several years’ worth of work by staff, project archivists, volunteers, and IT personnel. The collections include County Clerk maps, Park Commission photographs, Parks Department lantern slides, and 1927–1941 photos of the Playland Amusement Park in Rye.
 
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April 27th, 2011: Eighteenth Century Collections Online - Eighteenth Century Collections Online is a searchable database of 2,231 keyed-text editions of every significant English-language and foreign-language title printed in the United Kingdom during the 18th century, along with thousands of important works published in the Americas. A 12-year initiative between the University of Michigan Library and Oxford University named the Text Creation Partnership has produced page images for keying and is permitting their online release in support of UM’s commitment to the creation of open access cultural heritage archives. The endeavor is part of the Eighteenth Century Collections Online published by Gale Cengage Learning.
 
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April 20th, 2011: Oregon Digital Library - The Oregon Digital Library is a searchable portal for several digital collections created by institutions around the state. At present, the ODL gateway can access approximately 500,000 items from Oregon State University, the University of Oregon, Southern Oregon University, Lewis and Clark College, Oregon Institute of Technology, and other digital collections throughout the state.
 
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April 13th, 2011: Civil War in the American South - Civil War in the American South is a new, collaborative web portal developed by members of the Association of Southeastern Research Libraries to provide one-stop access to materials about the American Civil War Era, 1850 through 1865. The new website was launched April 11 to connect users to primary-source materials held across ASERL libraries about the intellectual and cultural underpinnings of the Civil War. The site currently links to more than 3,600 digitized items, and is expected to grow to more than 5,000 items in the near future. The portal was developed for ASERL by the Digital Library of Georgia, and features advanced search functionalities to help users quickly discover the items they seek and to browse the collection by specific filters, including contributing library, format, and other aspects of the collection.
 
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April 7th, 2011: Digital Library of the Caribbean - The Digital Library of the Caribbean is a cooperative digital library of resources from and about the Caribbean and circum-Caribbean. The library provides access to digitized versions of cultural, historical, and research materials currently held in archives, libraries, and private collections. The amount of open access content it provides surpasses many commercial Caribbean collections. Some of its special features include the Caribbean Newspaper Digital Library, the Caribbean Map Collection, and Haiti: An Island Luminous. Administered by Florida International University in partnership with the University of the Virgin Islands and the University of Florida, the library’s technical infrastructure is provided by the University of Florida in association with the Florida Center for Library Automation.
 
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March 31st, 2011: Los Angeles County Museum of Art Image Library - The Los Angeles County Museum of Art Image Library offers a growing body of high-resolution images (between 10–40 MB) from its encyclopedic collection that are thought to be in the public domain and available without restriction, free of charge. The image library represents the museum’s commitment to making the breadth and depth of its collections accessible online and to the widest possible audience. Categories of material range from art of the ancient Near East to decorative arts, textiles, and photography.
 
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March 24th, 2011: Sacramento Room Digitization Project - The Sacramento Room Digitization Project was launched in October 2010 with the intention of showcasing choice images from the Sacramento Public Library’s Sacramento Room: more than 3,000 photographs, postcards, and menus. The project mission is to provide an image-based window into the social, political, and economic history of the Greater Sacramento area from the 1840s to the present day. The project is also intended to be a dynamic venture, seeking growth through the addition of collections and improvement through staff scholarship and community input. Quick searches can be done by date or subject.
 
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March 17th, 2011: The Blues Archives - The Blues Archives at the University of Mississippi houses more than 20,000 blues-related photographs as part of a collection of materials that document the blues from the beginnings of its popularity in the 1920s through the present. Housing one of the largest collections of blues recordings, publications, and memorabilia in the world, holdings also include more than 60,000 sound recordings in most audio formats, over 1,000 videos, and more than 6,000 books, periodicals, and newsletters. Important collections include B.B. King’s personal record collection.
 
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March 10th, 2011: Carnival Collection of Tulane University’s Louisiana Research Collection - The Carnival Collection of Tulane University’s Louisiana Research Collection preserves possibly the largest assemblage of New Orleans Carnival paper and ephemera, such as invitations, dance cards, call-out cards, printed float plates, and bulletins. Among the most notable items are the more than 5,000 original designs for Carnival floats and costumes. Many of these are from the “Golden Age” of Carnival and feature the work of noted designers such as Jennie Wilde, B. A. Wikstrom, and Charles Briton. LaRC also preserves the works of more contemporary designers, including Patricia Hardin, Olga Peters, and designer and noted Carnival historian Henri Schindler. Tulane is in the process of putting its entire Carnival design collection online and hopes to complete the project by the end of 2012. As of March 4, the online collection consisted of float designs from Comus and Proteus. Comus float designs range from 1901 to 1916, and Proteus designs include the years 1882 to 1891. Another excellent Mardi Gras digital library is the Judge John Minor Wisdom Collection at the Earl K. Long Library, University of New Orleans, which houses more than 300 invitations, programs, and dance cards.
 
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March 2nd, 2011: West Texas Digital Archives - The West Texas Digital Archives is a digital repository project of the Abilene Library Consortium, which partners with Abilene Christian University Library, Abilene Public Library, Center for Contemporary Arts, Grace Museum, Hardin-Simmons University Library, Howard Payne University Library in Brownwood, McMurry University Library, Old Jail Art Center in Albany, and the 12th Armored Division Memorial Museum. It is funded by the Dodge Jones Foundation and the Dian Graves Owen Foundation. The repository contains photographs, newspapers, yearbooks, letters, oral histories, periodicals, manuscripts, journals, documents, maps, and audio files. It also includes the newsletter of the 12th Armored Division Memorial Museum.
 
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February 24th, 2011: Photographs from the Chicago Daily News - Photographs from the Chicago Daily News include more than 55,000 images of urban life captured on glass plate negatives between 1902 and 1933 by photographers employed by the Chicago Daily News, then one of Chicago’s leading newspapers. The photographs illustrate the enormous variety of topics and events covered in the newspaper, although only about 20% of the images in the collection were published in the newspaper. In addition to many Chicagoans, the images include politicians, actors, and other prominent people who stopped in Chicago during their travels and individual athletes and sports teams who came to Chicago. In April 1960, the newspaper owner, Field Enterprises, turned over approximately 83,000 glass negatives to the Chicago Historical Society (now known as the Chicago History Museum). The collection is displayed as part of the Library of Congress American Memory Project.
 
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February 17th, 2011: Spanish Civil War digital collections - The Spanish Civil War digital collections at the University of California, San Diego, are part of the Southworth Spanish Civil War Collection of the Mandeville Special Collections Library, the largest extant collection of materials on the war. The digital archive features postal and other stamps of the war, Communist ephemera from Madrid, postcards, drawings made by Spanish children, photojournalism, posters, and an audiovisual archive of testimonies of militants, witnesses, and victims of the Spanish Civil War and the Francoist repression.
 
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February 10th, 2011: War Posters Collection - The digital War Posters Collection of the Enoch Pratt Free Library in Baltimore is a sampling of the more than 500 World War I and II posters housed at the library. War posters were more than slogans; they adopted the power of art and advertising to convey social, economic, and political ideas. The Office of War Information arranged for local defense councils to have volunteers distribute the free posters and display them in libraries, post offices, schools, and factories.
 
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February 4th, 2011: La Biblioteca Valenciana Digital - La Biblioteca Valenciana Digital contains such materials as incunabula, manuscripts, books of local customs and manners, Valencian literary classics, historical monographs, and regional law treatises. In order to provide a wide diffusion for the rich bibliographical heritage of Valencia, Spain, in 2002, the Generalitat of the Valencian Community, through the Valencian Library, began a digitization project. Since then, this project has embraced the most relevant and significant Valencian works, both literary and scientific, as well as works that have been considered of greater interest for scientific research development on the autonomous region’s bibliographical and cultural heritage.
 
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January 26th, 2011: Volunteer Voices - Volunteer Voices is Tennessee’s statewide digitization program involving the state’s archives, libraries, repositories, historic homes, and museums. Its goals are to develop digital collections that document Tennessee’s history and culture; facilitate use of these collections in K–16 classrooms and by the general public; and offer training opportunities for personnel to learn digitization standards and best practices. In 2005, Volunteer Voices received a three-year grant from the Institute of Museum and Library Services to build its first digital collection, The Growth of Democracy in Tennessee. Three digital-content specialists traversed the state, scanning and creating records for more than 10,000 items (photographs and historic documents) from approximately 100 institutions. Researchers can search the database by keyword, or browse by broad topic (e.g., “Trade, Business, and Industry”), era, county, or institution. Volunteer Voices is managed through Tenn-Share by an advisory board of representatives from several institutions.
 
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January 20th, 2011: John F. Kennedy Digital Archives - The John F. Kennedy Digital Archives is a public-private partnership between the John F. Kennedy Presidential Library and Museum and the John F. Kennedy Library Foundation in Boston. Opened on January 13, shortly before the 50th anniversary of JFK’s inauguration, its objectives are to digitize, index, and retain permanently millions of presidential documents, photographs, and audiovisual recordings related to the Kennedy administration. Library staff have digitized a number of collections in their entirety: the President’s office files, the White House central chronological files, the John F. Kennedy personal papers, and the White House audio collection. It has also digitized portions of the White House central subject files, White House photographs, White House films, the CBS television network collection, films from United States government agencies, and gifts from heads of state, a collection of museum artifacts. As of January 2011, the Digital Archives contain over 200,000 pages of textual documents, 1,500 photographs, 1,240 audio files, 80 moving image files, and nearly 300 museum artifacts.
 
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January 12th, 2011: State Historical Society of Missouri - The State Historical Society of Missouri has digitized the 1908–1922 run of the Columbia Missourian newspaper, then called the University Missourian. The print newspapers are held by the Ellis Library of the University of Missouri at Columbia. The historical society digital collections also include thousands of editorial cartoons, articles, photographs, and artwork, as well as images of more than 400 works by Missouri artists George Caleb Bingham and Thomas Hart Benton.
 
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January 5th, 2011: Norman Rockwell Digital Collection - The New Norman Rockwell Digital Collection of the Norman Rockwell Museum in Stockbridge, Massachusetts, is offering online access beginning January 6. The collection contains more than 50,000 paintings, sketches, photographs, letters, objects, and ephemera related to the famous American illustrator Norman Rockwell (1894–1978), many of which have never been publicly viewed before. ProjectNORMAN (New Online Rockwell Media Art and Archive Network) is preserving and making the Norman Rockwell Museum art and archival collections accessible to researchers, curators, students and the general public. The decade-long project, begun in 2003, is a 10-year, comprehensive online publishing project to preserve, catalog, computerize, and digitize the museum’s collection of original artworks and archival objects. In 2009, a grant was awarded from the Institute of Museum and Library Services to fund the purchase of software that converts the internal collections management system into a customized, searchable, online database. Do you know of a digital library collection that we can mention in this AL Direct feature? Tell us about it.
 
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December 26th, 2010: National Library of Wales Digital Mirror - The National Library of Wales Digital Mirror has added five medieval manuscripts to its online collection of rare materials in its holdings. Among its newest online treasures is the Latin text of Historia de preliis Alexandri Magni (The History of Alexander’s Battles), based on a 10th-century translation into Latin by Leo of Naples of a Greek text. The manuscript is one of the most elaborately decorated medieval manuscripts in the library. It is also one of only a few medieval manuscripts at the National Library of Wales to retain its original binding— wooden boards, covered with crimson velvet—and retains brass bosses, corner pieces and pins, and fastenings for thongs. It was probably bound in England in the late 15th century.
 
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December 16th, 2010: Human Rights Documentation Initiative - The University of Texas Libraries established the Human Rights Documentation Initiative in 2008, thanks in large part to funding from the Bridgeway Foundation in Houston. Its initial charge was to digitally preserve the records of human rights abuses in the Rwandan Genocide of 1994. The project to collect, preserve, and make accessible the Rwandan records has continued with itinerant staff constantly moving between Austin and Kigali, the site of the Kigali Memorial Centre where the fragile and sometimes anachronistic materials were being held. On December 10, the project reached a milestone with the inauguration of the Genocide Archive Rwanda, a new and comprehensive repository for information related to the genocide. The physical archive housed on-site at the Kigali Genocide Memorial facility in Kigali will contain the original audiovisual, documentary, and photographic materials in a secure, controlled environment. The digital archive will eventually house copies of all audiovisual recordings, and scans of all known documents and photographs will be accessible to researchers through a cross-referenced system that allows keyword searches, first on-site and ultimately online. HRDI’s mission has also expanded in scope, establishing projects with the Free Burma Rangers and the Texas After Violence Project, and it is currently negotiating new plans in Latin America.
 
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December 9th, 2010: New-York Historical Society Library - The New-York Historical Society Library holds among its many resources a substantial collection of manuscript materials documenting American slavery and the slave trade in the Atlantic world. The 14 collections on this website are among the most important of these manuscript collections. They consist of diaries, account books, letter books, ships’ logs, indentures, bills of sale, personal papers, and records of institutions. Some of the highlights include the records of the New York Manumission Society and the African Free School, the diaries and correspondence of English abolitionists Granville Sharp and John Clarkson, the papers of the Boston antislavery activist Lysander Spooner, the records of the Massachusetts Anti-Slavery Society, the draft of Charles Sumner’s famous 1855 speech The Anti-Slavery Enterprise, and an account book kept by the slave-trading firm Bolton, Dickens & Co.
 
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December 2nd, 2010: Oregon State University Libraries’ Gerald W. Williams Collection - The Oregon State University Libraries’ Gerald W. Williams Collection, which was acquired in 2007, consists of the collected historic photographs, personal papers, and research library of Gerald “Jerry” Williams, former national historian for the U.S. Forest Service. Williams, a native Oregonian, spent much of his Forest Service career in the Pacific Northwest prior to being appointed national historian in 1998. Many outstanding historic photographs in the Williams Collection have been digitized, including photos of the WWI-era Spruce Production Division, logging photos of northwest Oregon taken by John Fletcher Ford, photos of Celilo Falls taken in 1956 by Jack Williams, and photos of Great Depression–era Civilian Conservation Corps camps and activities, and historic postcards arranged in several geographically based albums.
 
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November 29th, 2010: The University of Vermont Libraries’ Center for Digital Initiatives - The University of Vermont Libraries’ Center for Digital Initiatives makes unique digital collections available for researchers at UVM and beyond. The CDI seeks to cooperate with university, community, state, and other partners to produce cohesive digital collections that appeal to various user groups. These collections include documents, photographs, data, artifacts, and audiovisual materials. Some of the subjects currently available are the archives of the Proctor Maple Research Center, maple sugar and maple syrup recipe collections, medieval and Renaissance manuscripts, 900 images of the oldest long-distance hiking trail (the Long Trail) in the United States, and photographic collections of Burlington (1920–1960) and Danville (1940s).
 
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November 18th, 2010: Digital South Asia Library - The Digital South Asia Library provides digital materials for reference and research on South Asia to scholars, public officials, business leaders, and other users. This project builds upon a two-year pilot project funded by the Association of Research Libraries’ Global Resources Program with support from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation. Participants in the Digital South Asia Library include leading U.S. universities, the Center for Research Libraries, the South Asia Microform Project, the Committee on South Asian Libraries and Documentation, the Association for Asian Studies, the Library of Congress, the Asia Society, the British Library, the University of Oxford, the University of Cambridge, MOZHI in India, the Sundarayya Vignana Kendram in India, Madan Puraskar Pustakalaya in Nepal, and other institutions in South Asia. DSAL is a project of the Center for Research Libraries and the University of Chicago. Image collections include the Glenn Hensley Photo Library (World War II), the American Institute of Indian Studies, the Government College of Arts and Crafts in Chennai, the Oriental and India Office Collections, and the Robert Keagle and Frank Bond photo libraries (World War II).
 
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November 11th, 2010: Edward R. Murrow Collection - The Edward R. Murrow Collection, circa 1913–1985, housed at Tufts University Digital Collections and Archives, is the world’s largest collection of material about the internationally renowned journalist. The papers include correspondence, personal materials, work-related files, audiovisual materials, memorabilia, books, and tributes to Murrow. Digital objects from the Murrow papers include more than 320 photographs of Murrow, his family, and his associates, and include Murrow in action during World War II and the Korean War as well as images from his radio and television shows.
 
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November 4th, 2010: Washington Rural Heritage - Guided by an initiative of the Washington State Library, Washington Rural Heritage is an ongoing project of small, rural libraries and partnering cultural institutions that hold collections of historic materials documenting the early culture, industry, and community life of Washington State but that lack staffing, expertise, and resources to make these treasures widely available to the public by themselves. The collaboratively digitized collections include: old photographs, historical texts, memorabilia and ephemera, scrapbooks, maps, artwork, artifacts, and video and audio files (e.g., oral histories, lectures, interviews). Washington State Library houses the digital collections, while the physical collections are housed locally by owning institutions around the state, such as Whatcom County Public Library’s Lummi Island Public Library, which documents the fishing traditions in Lummi Island Heritage, and Roslyn Public Library’s Roslyn Heritage Collection of the mining and logging industries.
 
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October 28th, 2010: Hawaii War Records Depository - The Hawaii War Records Depository, established in 1943 at the University of Hawaii at Manoa Library, is an extensive collection of materials that document life in Hawaii during World War II. Some 880 photographs, taken between 1941 and 1946 by the U.S. Army Signal Corps and the U.S. Navy, document the impact of World War II on Hawaii, the activities of the Army and Navy, and the military’s relationship with Hawaii’s civilian population. Also included are approximately 1,000 photographs clearly identified as being from the Honolulu Star-Bulletin and 330 photographs from the Honolulu Advertiser. Because the newspapers have lost most of their old photographs, these prints frequently are the only copies extant from the World War II era.
 
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October 21st, 2010: Montana Memory Project - The Montana Memory Project is a collection of digital collections and items relating to Montana’s cultural heritage, curated by the Montana State Library in Helena. Access is free and open through the internet. Many of these items are digitized copies of historic material, while others are contemporary. Many Montana libraries, museums, archives, and cultural institutions have added and are in the process of adding materials to this collection. The contents include digital newspapers, maps, copies of photographs, rare books, historic documents, diaries, oral histories, audio and video clips, paintings, illustrations, and art.
 
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October 14th, 2010: University of Missouri Digital Library - Founded in 2001, the University of Missouri Digital Library provides a repository for digitized items on behalf of the UM Libraries. Over 20 text collections and 23 image collections have been added, including materials from 15 libraries around the state of Missouri. Text collections include the Civil War in Missouri, the Missouri Alumnus magazine, Missouriana Digital Text Collection, and Daniel Webster speeches. Image collections include Cows on the Lawn (dairy husbandry at UM), Joplin historical postcards, sheet music collections, Sanborn maps for Missouri, and the photo archives of the St. Louis Globe-Democrat.
 
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October 7th, 2010: Homeland Security Digital Library - For the first time in its seven-year history, the Homeland Security Digital Library has opened a portion of its unique and unrivaled collection to the public. The HSDL is the nation’s premier collection of documents related to homeland security policy, strategy, and organizational management. Sponsored by the U.S. Department of Homeland Security’s National Preparedness Directorate (under FEMA) and the Naval Postgraduate School Center for Homeland Defense and Security, the HSDL is composed of homeland security–related documents collected from a wide variety of sources. These include federal, state, tribal, and local government agencies, professional organizations, think tanks, academic institutions, and international governing bodies. Although largely comprised of reports, this specialized library also provides homeland security subject matter in other formats including videos, slide presentations, maps, databases, and statistics. Resources are carefully selected and evaluated by a team of librarians and subject-matter specialists. Anyone interested in homeland-security research can access more than 40,000 policy and strategy documents, about half the total collection, from an array of government and academic sources with assurance that the resources have been professionally reviewed. As the definition of homeland security has expanded beyond terrorism to include other man-made and natural catastrophic events, the subject matter contained in the library has also expanded to include topics such as school violence, pandemic flu, and natural disasters. Previously, anyone seeking to research the site needed to gain pre-approved permission for access. Account holders have access to more than twice the information available on the public site, and have additional benefits including research support, user-specified email alerts on topics of interest, a quarterly e-newsletter, and critical releases. Homeland security professionals, students, and academics are invited to apply for an account by filling out a brief email form available via a link under the homepage login button.
 
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September 30th, 2010: National Library of Medicine Digital Collections - The National Library of Medicine Digital Collections complement the PubMed Central digital archive of electronic journal articles. The newly launched repository allows rich searching, browsing, and retrieval of monographs and films from NLM’s History of Medicine Division. Additional content and other format types will be added over time. Users can perform full-text and keyword searching within each collection or across the entire repository. This first release of Digital Collections includes a newly expanded set of Cholera Online monographs, a portion of which NLM first published online in PDF format in 2007. The version of Cholera Online now available via Digital Collections includes 518 books (dating from 1817 to 1900) about cholera pandemics of that period. More information about the selection of the books and the subject of cholera may be found on the original Cholera Online site. Each book was scanned into high-quality TIFF images, which underwent optical character recognition to generate corresponding text files. Finally, a JPEG2000 derivative was created for each page for presentation through the integrated book viewer, which includes a Flash-based zooming feature for resizing and rotating a page on demand.
 
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September 23rd, 2010: Digital Horizons: A Plains Media Resource - Digital Horizons: A Plains Media Resource is a consortium of seven public and private partners that was created in 2007 to provide, maintain, and preserve a wide range of historical and significant content related to North Dakota and Minnesota. Its goals include: developing the digital asset management capabilities of members such as Fargo Public Library, Prairie Public Broadcasting, and the North Dakota State University Institute for Regional Studies and University Archives; and encouraging the public to share historical resources from their personal collections.
 
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September 17th, 2010: Birmingham (Ala.) Public Library Digital Collections - The Birmingham (Ala.) Public Library Digital Collections were created to preserve and make available the local history of Birmingham and the surrounding area. The collections include maps, city newspapers of the late 19th century, coal mining in the region, movie theatres, the Sixteenth Street Baptist Church bombing of 1963, engravings of North American Indians by Theodore De Bry, women artists, Alabama inventors, old homes, school yearbooks, street railroads, and Birmingham businesses. The library has a blog that updates information about the digital collections.
 
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September 9th, 2010: The Word on the Street digital collection - The Word on the Street digital collection (subtitled “How Ordinary Scots in Bygone Days Found Out What Was Happening”) is the National Library of Scotland’s online archive of nearly 1,800 broadsides. It lets you see for yourself how people in Scotland read street literature to find out what was going on between 1650 and 1910. Broadsides were the tabloids of their day. Sometimes pinned up on walls in houses and alehouses, these single sheets carried public notices, news, speeches, and songs that could be read (or sung) aloud. Each broadside comes with a detailed commentary and most also have a full transcription of the text, plus a downloadable PDF facsimile. You can search by keyword, browse by title, or browse by subject.
 
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Bottle of insulin with beige label printed in black with red rubber stopper, Connaught Medical Research Laboratories, Toronto, November 5, 1923September 2nd, 2010: Fisher Digital Collections - The Fisher Digital Collections showcase the treasures of the Thomas Fisher Rare Book Library at the University of Toronto. All of the digital collections provide page images, enhanced indexing features, and the ability to conduct full-text searching on the contents of the documents themselves. The special digital collections include human anatomy, the Barren Lands, Canadian pamphlets and broadsides, paintings of flora by Agnes Chamberlin, etchings of of Wenceslaus Hollar, the early development of insulin, and ancient Egyptian papyri.
 
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August 26th, 2010: Local History Collection - The Local History Collection at Bloomingdale (Ill.) Public Library ranges from images of the Midwest town’s former Adventureland Amusement Park, located in nearby Addison, which, according to library Director Timothy Jarzemsky, “really captures the mood of the American family during the booming growth of suburbs in the 1960s and 1970s” to photos and clippings that document highlights of the town’s 177-year history. Included is a 21st-century photo of the 1832 home of Bloomingdale founder George Washington Meacham; a 1900 photo of the Charles Hollenbach mansion, the stately summer home of the sausage maker from Chicago; and a 1933 barn-raising.
 
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Postcard, "Mount Kineo House from Mt. Kineo, Moosehead Lake, Maine." The sheer size of this hotel, built in 1884 and expanded until 1911 when it could accommodate 500 guests, indicates the popularity of the area and its outdoor recreation activities, such as hunting, fishing, and canoeing. However, in 1938 Mount Kineo House was closed and soon burned to the ground during demolition. University of Maine, Fogler Library Special Collections Postcards of Maine Collection, Box 290August 19th, 2010: Windows on Maine - Windows on Maine is a pilot project to develop an online service offering streaming video programs and clips, still images, texts, and other primary and secondary digital resources via broadband and wireless connections. It features a searchable database of complete programs and video clips from Maine Public Broadcasting Network’s award-winning historical series, HOME: The Story of Maine, and its science series, Quest: Investigating Our World. Multimedia resources have also been selected from the collections of the Fogler Library and the Maine Folklife Center at the University of Maine, Northeast Historic Films, Maine State Museum, Maine State Archives, and the Maine Historical Society that portray Maine’s history and the ecology of the Gulf of Maine: forestry and lumbering, fishing and fishermen, hunting and fur trading, and shipping and ship building.
 
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August 12th, 2010: World Digital Library - The World Digital Library makes available, free of charge and in multilingual format, significant primary materials from countries and cultures around the world. Launched in 2009, its principal objectives are to promote international and intercultural understanding, and expand the volume and variety of cultural content on the internet. These cultural treasures include manuscripts, maps, rare books, musical scores, recordings, films, prints, photographs, and architectural drawings. The library was developed by a team at the U.S. Library of Congress, with contributions by partner institutions in many countries, the support of UNESCO, and the financial support of a number of companies and private foundations. The collection is browsable by place, time, topic, type of item, and institution.
 
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On Sept. 1, 1939, Nazi Party Leader Albert Forster announces that the Free City of Danzig (Gdansk), Poland, is part of the Third ReichAugust 5th, 2010: National Digital Library of Poland - The National Digital Library of Poland (CBN Polona) was created to enhance wide and easy access to the digital collections of the National Library in Warsaw, including the most important editions of literature and scientific materials, historical documents, journals, graphics, photography, scores, and maps. Its major aims are to present Polish cultural heritage and show the abundance of the library’s collections. The library uses dLibra Digital Library Framework software, elaborated and developed by the Poznań Supercomputing and Networking Center.
 
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Basalt lunar sample 10050 from Apollo 11 mission, a polarized light microscope image of a standard thin section; 2.85mm field of vision at 2.5 magnification. Photo JSC04200July 29th, 2010: Lunar Sample Atlas - The Lunar Sample Atlas of the Lunar and Planetary Institute in Houston contains laboratory images of moon-rock samples from the Apollo missions. Containing full-color views in microscopic thin-sections, the digital library offers cutting views and diagrams that illustrate how the samples were subdivided for scientific analyses and in situ views of the samples on the lunar surface. The Lunar Sample Atlas contains information about type of sample (e.g., rock, soil), lithology (e.g., basalt, norite), and a description of the sample. Links to additional information about each sample are provided for those that have been previously described in The Lunar Sample Compendium and Lunar Sample Catalogs.
 
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July 22nd, 2010: University of Arizona Library Digital Collections - The University of Arizona Library Digital Collections is part of the library’s Special Collections, which maintains rare books and unique archival materials that allow in-depth research on selected topics. The digital collections contain material from the university, including the Arizona, Southwestern, and Borderlands Photograph Collection; the Morris K. Udall Oral History Project; and the Correspondence of the Secretary of the Arizona Territory, 1864–1893.
 
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July 20th, 2010: University of South Florida’s Educational Technology Clearinghouse - The University of South Florida’s Educational Technology Clearinghouse offers Maps ETC—a collection of more than 5,000 historical maps that are available for free download and reuse by teachers and students. The collection is organized by continent and country. United States maps are further broken down by state and historical theme. A friendly license allows teachers and students to use up to 25 maps in noncommercial school projects without further permission. All maps are available as GIF or JPEG files for screen display as well as in PDF format for printing. Use the GIF or JPEG maps for classroom presentations and student websites. Use the PDF maps for displays, bulletin boards, and printed school reports.
 
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July 8th, 2010: Commonwealth College Fortnightly - Commonwealth College Fortnightly is the 14-volume run of the newsletter of Commonwealth College, a controversial labor college that operated near Mena, Arkansas, from 1924 to 1940. Digitized by the Special Collections Department of the University of Arkansas Libraries, the newsletter affords an inside look at an institution devoted to cooperative living and labor education, for which the FBI investigated it, eventually cleared the college of promoting free love, Bolshevism, and Communism. Among its “Commoner” graduates was future six-term Arkansas governor Orval E. Faubus, who fought the desegregration of Little Rock Central High in 1957.
 
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Toothbrush Drill at the Brackenridge School, Houston. 	Printed half-tone photograph of a group of unidentified children at the Brackenridge School standing in a semi-circle and participating in a toothbrush drill, 1914-1915. An early phonograph with external horn is in the foreground. A horse and carriage are stopped in an unidentified street in the background.July 2nd, 2010: Historic Houston Photographs Collection - The Historic Houston Photographs Collection, created by the University of Houston’s M. D. Anderson Library, is drawn from the extensive group of research materials known as the George Fuermann “Texas and Houston” Collection. Houston Post writer Fuermann amassed a collection of Texana between 1950 and 1971. Downtown Houston with horse-drawn buggies, the old City Hall and Union Station buildings, verdant parks, and swimming holes are some of the images found here.
 
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June 30th, 2010: North Carolina Maps - Five centuries of maps come together in the 3,200-item North Carolina Maps, which officially debuts June 30. A collaborative project of the North Carolina Collection at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Library, the North Carolina State Archives, and the Outer Banks History Center in Manteo, the collection is the result of a three-year project to identify and scan nearly every original map of the state published from 1584 to 1923, the collection also contains maps of every North Carolina county and maps published by the state through the year 2000. There is an interactive option allowing users to lay selected historic maps over current street maps and satellite images. A video showcases historic maps from the project with a Google Earth 3-D tour (3:31).
 
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Tyndall Target, vol. 2, no. 1 (Jan. 16-23, 1943), the publication of the Army Air Forces Gunnery School, Tyndall Field, FloridaJune 18th, 2010: Digital Military Newspaper Library - The Digital Military Newspaper Library is a pilot project of the University of Florida’s George A. Smathers Libraries to house, organize, and preserve 16 contemporary and historic military newspapers. These newspapers represent Naval and Air Force bases from many geographical regions around the state of Florida and will include Kennedy Space Center, a submarine base at King’s Bay Georgia, the Panama Canal Zone, and two newspapers in Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. This undertaking will seek to build on the success of other projects including the Florida Digital Newspaper Library and the Caribbean Newspaper Digital Library. Other related digital collections include the Korean War Oral History Collection, Vietnam War Veterans Oral History Collection, and World War II Oral History Collection from the Samuel Proctor Oral History Program.
 
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A postcard showing a black and white photograph of John Pratt, the inventor of the typewriter. Postcard text: (back) John Pratt of Centre, Ala., inventor of the first practical typewriter, which later became the Hammond typewriter. Mr. Pratt completed his invention by 1864 and was granted a patent in London, England, in 1866. He was born at Union, S.C., April 14, 1831, removed to Alabama in his early manhood and died in 1905 and is buried in Centre, Ala. From the Auburn University Postcard Collection. PC317June 10th, 2010: AlabamaMosaic - AlabamaMosaic is a repository of digital materials on Alabama’s history, culture, places, and people. Its purpose is to make unique historical treasures from the state’s archives, libraries, museums, and other repositories electronically accessible to Alabama residents and to students, researchers, and the general public in other states and countries. AlabamaMosaic was initiated under a grant from the Institute for Museum and Library Services and is now administered by the Network of Alabama Academic Libraries.
 
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Undated photo ca.1903-1909 of the Connecticut State Library when it was located in the State Capitol. View is facing east and shows the all-metal tiered shelving installed in 1903, and the new electric lightsJune 2nd, 2010: Connecticut State Library Digital Collections - The Connecticut State Library Digital Collections feature items from the Connecticut State Library, State Archives, and the Musuem of Connecticut History. These include modern and historical records from the three branches of state government documenting the evolution of state public policy and its implementation, the rights and claims of citizens, and the history of the state and its people. Other collections include aerial surveys of the state since 1934, and the Works Progress Administration Census of Old Buildings from the 1930s.
 
 
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The Amherst Bicycle Club in Brattleboro, Vermont on May 16, 1881. Portrait of four club members taken in the Brattleboro studio of C. L. Howe. Members are wearing athletic clothes of the day and posed with a high wheeler bicycle. Item #747May 26th, 2010: Digital Amherst - Utilizing the historical and literary resources of the Jones Library of Amherst, Massachusetts, in collaboration with area residents and scholars, Digital Amherst celebrates the town through images, multimedia, and documents that reflect the independent spirit of its people, creative works, and culture. Digital Amherst is a pilot project to develop a small but rich online collection of the historic and cultural stories about the town of Amherst and its influence in the Connecticut Valley and beyond. The project was initiated in celebration of Amherst’s 250th anniversary in 2009. The site uses the software system Omeka, a project of the Center for History and New Media at George Mason University. Access is by theme, century, format, or collection.
 
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May 20th, 2010: The National Park Service E-Library - The 1940 booklet A Brief History of the National Park Service, one of almost 4,000 books, reports, scientific monographs, and articles that comprise The National Park Service E-Library, begins with the legend of Montana lawyer Cornelius Hedges sharing his vision of a “national park” with fellow Yellowstone explorers one autumn night in 1870 from the shadows of a wilderness campfire. (A web edition note goes on to discredit as myth the campfire part.) The collection houses information on all aspects of the NPS mission since its August 25, 1916, founding. Subject matter includes archeological and anthropological research, history and natural history, urban ecology, wildlife, and geology.
 
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May 13th, 2010: Remember Haiti - Remember Haiti is a selection of resources on the John Carter Brown Library website showcasing books at Brown University relating to Haiti. Created with the support of partners from around the world, the intent of this digital library is to provide access to the remarkable history of Haiti, a nation with an extraordinarily rich heritage, despite its well-known challenges. The project was made possible through the generosity of David Rumsey, a board member of the John Carter Brown Library. The recent earthquake of January 12, 2010, has only deepened the need to raise awareness of Haiti’s story, and to increase access to the rare books and maps that tell it. The books have been digitized through the Internet Archive and cover topics on race and slavery, revolution, government, economy, environment, culture, people, and places.
 
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Lit2Go logoMay 6th, 2010: Lit2Go - Lit2Go is a free online collection of stories and poems in MP3 (audiobook) format developed by the Florida Educational Technology Clearinghouse. Students and teachers can download the files to an MP3 player and listen on the go, listen to the files on a computer, view the text on a webpage and read along as the file plays, or print out the stories and poems. Selections are browsable by author or title; and searchable by title, author, keywords, or reading level. An abstract, citation, playing time, and word count are given for each of the passages. Many of the selections also have a related reading strategy identified. Each reading passage can also be downloaded as a PDF and printed for use as supplemental reading material for the classroom. Many of the selections can also be downloaded directly into an iTunes library.
 
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April 29th, 2010: University of North Texas Environmental Science Digital Collection - The University of North Texas Digital Libraries has just released an Environmental Science Digital Collection with 285 documents focusing on environmental policy. It contains web publications from the United States, Europe, China, and Japan that cover climate change, emissions, land use, sustainable development, water issues, and biodiversity. Documents from the U.S. Climate Change Science Program, NOAA, the International Geosphere-Biosphere Programme, the UN Environment Programme, and the World Meteorological Organization are included. The coordinator of the collection, Nathan Hall, is actively seeking content partners to contribute relevant materials.
 
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Letter from Mark Twain to Olivia Clemens, April 26, 1877, from BaltimoreApril 22nd, 2010: Mark Twain Project Online - The Mark Twain Project Online applies innovative technology to more than four decades’ worth of archival research by expert editors. Its ultimate purpose is to produce a digital critical edition, fully annotated, of everything Mark Twain wrote. MTPO is a collaboration between the Mark Twain Papers and Project of the Bancroft Library, the California Digital Library, and the University of California Press. The site currently offers more than 2,300 of Twain’s letters (both facsimile and text) and critical editions of The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn and Huck Finn and Tom Sawyer among the Indians.
 
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Daguerreotype image of Thomas Hart Benton, Democratic Senator from Missouri, 1821-1851. DAG no. 228April 15th, 2010: Library of Congress Prints and Photos: Online Catalog - The Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Online Catalog now has a new look and exciting new features. A dynamic redesign offers clean and visually inviting pages, with easy-to-use features for searching, browsing, and sharing. The site offers access to 1.25 million digital images and more than 600,000 records describing the collections in the Library’s Prints and Photographs Division. The new catalog brings the pictures to the forefront of the web pages. The original version, established in 1996, was more text-oriented and in need of an upgrade. The search option has been improved to be available on almost every page of the catalog, allowing for easy modification of searches—no need to click back to a search page to conduct a new search. The search engine is more robust, bringing up all applicable items. There are no limits to the amount of records that can be retrieved. Visitors can now browse by alphabetical lists of subjects, formats and creators across the entire catalog as well as for individual collections. Colorful banner images highlight the “learn more about it” essays for major collections, such as the popular Russian Empire photographs by Sergei M. Prokudin-Gorskii. The “view all” feature for major collections opens the door to interesting visual explorations. Viewing options, in general, are greatly expanded and now include gallery, grid, and slideshow features. The Works Progress Administration posters from the Great Depression are especially interesting in the slideshow format. Another new feature is the share/save tool. With stable and durable URLs, the searches and images can be shared quickly with one’s social network.
 
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Lunar chart in Johannes Hevleius's Johannis Hevelii Selenographia sive lunae descriptio (1647)March 31st, 2010: Swiss Electronic Library - The Swiss Electronic Library (e-rara.ch) is a collaborative project of several Swiss research libraries to digitize rare historical and scientific works in their collections, especially Swiss imprints. It opened to the public in March 2010, and aims to make more than 10,000 works available by the end of 2011. Major partners are the Bibliothèque de Genève, ETH-Bibliothek Zürich, University of Basel Library, University of Bern Library, and the Zürich Central Library. Other participating libraries are the University of Neuchâtel, Bibliothèque des Pasteurs, and the university libraries of Lausanne and Fribourg. Three collections are currently online: Swiss imprints of the 16th century, which includes important works in the history of the Reformation; the astronomical collection of the ETH-Bibliothek Zürich; and the architecture and urban planning collection of the ETH-Bibliothek Zürich.
 
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March 25th, 2010: National Library of Ireland - The National Library of Ireland holds the world’s largest collection of photographs relating to Ireland. Since 2007, the library has been engaged in a major digitization project to increase online access to its extensive collection of rare and remarkable glass plate negatives. Nearly 34,000 photographs, all relating to the period from 1860 to 1954, have been digitized from core collections, including the Lawrence, Independent, Poole, and Eason collections. These images are displayed at low resolution and accompanied by basic information such as title, date, and location (where available). Copies of high-resolution versions of these images can be ordered from the library, and further work is planned to maximize the full potential of the digital images.
 
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Jean-Jacques Rousseau, La botanique de J.J. Rousseau: ornée de soixante-cinq planches, imprimées en couleurs d'après les peintures de P.J. Redouté (Paris: Delachaussée, XIV, 1805)March 17th, 2010: The Biodiversity Heritage Library - The Biodiversity Heritage Library, the digitization component of the Encyclopedia of Life, is a consortium of 12 major natural history museum libraries, botanical libraries, and research institutions organized to digitize, serve, and preserve the legacy literature of biodiversity. Content consists primarily of books and periodicals in the public domain, and is searchable and browsable by title, author, subject, scientific name, location, and year of publication. All images are downloadable and free for noncommercial use under a Creative Commons license. The European Commission’s eContentPlus program has recently funded the BHL-Europe project, with 22 institutions, to assemble the European language literature. Negotiations are being pursued with the Chinese Academy of Sciences, the Atlas of Living Australia and contacts in Japan, India, and Russia to join the BHL consortium. Prior to digitization, the resources housed within each BHL institution have existed in isolation, available only to those with physical access to the collections. In November 2009, the collection added more than 21,000 new titles as a result of ingesting open-access texts scanned by the Internet Archive. The collection now includes some 2 million volumes.
 
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March 11th, 2010: Ulysses S. Grant Digital Collection - The Ulysses S. Grant Digital Collection at the Mississippi State University Libraries consists of 31 volumes of The Papers of Ulysses S. Grant, political cartoons, and sheet music from the larger collection. Other materials will be added to the digital collection as processing continues. The physical collection contains some 15,000 linear feet of correspondence, research notes, artifacts, photographs, scrapbooks, and memorabilia and includes information on Grant’s life and times. From this collection, the series of volumes edited by John Y. Simon, entitled The Papers of Ulysses S. Grant were chosen and published by the Southern Illinois University Press.
 
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Archived website for British National Parks, Oct. 1, 2009March 3rd, 2010: U.K. Web Archive - The British Library has launched a U.K. Web Archive designed to preserve pages from U.K. web domains, much as the library preserves a physical archive of books. The system uses the open source Hadoop software and was built by IBM. Here you can see how sites have changed over time, locate information no longer available on the live web, and observe the unfolding history of a spectrum of U.K. activities represented online. Sites that no longer exist elsewhere are found here and those yet to be archived can be saved for the future by nominating them. Searches are by title of website, full text or URL; the site is also browsable by subject, special collection, or alphabetical list. The special collections are groups of websites brought together on a particular theme by librarians, curators, and other specialists, often working in collaboration with key organizations in the field. They can be events-based (the 2012 Olympic and Paralympic Games), topical (the Credit Crunch Collection) or subject-oriented (the British Countryside Collections).
 
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February 25th, 2010: Connecticut History Online - Connecticut History Online is a digital collection of over 15,000 digital primary sources, together with associated interpretive and educational material. Now in its 10th year, CHO is embarking on a collaboration with the Encyclopedia of Connecticut History Online to serve the needs of scholars, teachers and students, genealogists, and the general public. This new initiative builds upon a very successful collaboration of libraries and museums carried out in two IMLS National Leadership grant-funded phases (1999–2007) that focused on digital capture of historical artifacts, including photographs, maps, broadsides, oral histories, manuscripts, and oral histories. These document events, people, and places that are part of the fabric of Connecticut and American social, business, political, educational, cultural, and civic life. The four current CHO partners (the Connecticut Historical Society, Connecticut State Library, Mystic Seaport, and the Thomas J. Dodd Research Center) represent three major communities that preserve and make accessible historical collections within the state of Connecticut. Their combined assets include book and periodical volumes, manuscript materials, photographs and graphics, oral histories, maps, artifacts, and broadsides.
 
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February 17th, 2010: Crafting Victories: Campaign Materials from the Larry Gibson Collection - Crafting Victories: Campaign Materials from the Larry Gibson Collection is a project of the Thurgood Marshall Law Library at the University of Maryland. The site is part of the library’s larger “African Americans in the Law Collection,” which is focused on telling the story and experiences of African-American lawyers. This particular collection explores the role that African-American legal practitioners played in creating political opportunities for black voters in Maryland. Professor Larry S. Gibson has played a leadership role in the campaigns of many Maryland and national politicians beginning with his first effort organizing the campaign of Joseph Howard for Judge on the Supreme Bench of Baltimore City in 1968. Success in the Howard campaign was followed by work on the local campaigns of Milton Allen, William H. Murphy, Paul Chester, Wayne Curry, and Kurt Schmoke. At the national level he has worked on the presidential campaigns of George McGovern, Jimmy Carter, and Bill Clinton. Internationally, Gibson’s organizational talents have been employed by candidates as far away as Liberia and Madagascar.
 
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February 10th, 2010: University of Iowa Museum of Art - The permanent collections of the University of Iowa Museum of Art contain more than 12,000 objects, from masterworks of European and American Art of the 20th century to a world-renowned collection of traditional African Art. During the 1940s and 1950s, the University’s School of Art and Art History presented exhibitions of contemporary art and acquired works from these exhibitions. Many of the museum’s most important paintings were acquired during these years, including Max Beckmann’s Karneval and Joan Miró’s 1939 A Drop of Dew Falling from the Wing of a Bird Awakens Rosalie Asleep in the Shade of a Cobweb. Areas represented in the UIMA collections include African arts, art of the Americas, ceramics, drawings, paintings, photography, prints, sculpture, and other arts. Currently, the UIMA Digital Collection features over 5,100 of the museum’s 12,000 objects; the rest of the holdings will be added in the near future.
 
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Scottsdale's beloved 'Cowboy Sign' on the northeast corner of Scottsdale Road and Main Street has been a much-photographed symbol of The West's Most Western Town since its first version was erected by the Scottsdale Chamber of Commerce, with the help of local sign-maker Monte Flagg in 1952. In 1956, replicas of the cowboy sign were posted in 15 other locations throughout Scottsdale and the surrounding area to indicate the direction and mileage to Scottsdale.February 3rd, 2010: Scottsdale Public Digital Collection of the Week - The Scottsdale (Ariz.) Public Library Digital Collection provides access to digital images of cultural and historical interest to Scottsdale residents and researchers. The collection showcases the history and growth of what has changed from a small farming community into a world-class city. At present, the collection’s time period spans the late 1800s to the mid-20th century and beyond. It contains digital versions of increasingly valuable, fragile, and hard-to-use originals of people, places, and things pertaining to the city.
 
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January 28th, 2010: J. León Helguera Collection of Colombiana - The J. León Helguera Collection of Colombiana provides access to unique primary sources on 19th-century Colombian history and culture. The result of a half-century of collecting on three continents, it is one of the largest and most wide-ranging in the United States. Materials are grouped into three separate types: broadsides, 1825–1972; pamphlets (including novenas), 1785–1969; and programas, 1819–1914. The site allows for easy browsing (by date, type, or subject), or detailed searching. The collection is curated by the Jean and Alexander Heard Library at Vanderbilt University in Nashville, Tennessee. Currently only 66 documents are searchable, but the library hopes to expand the project.
 
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January 20th, 2010: University of Houston Digital Library - The University of Houston Digital Library opened its virtual doors in November 2009 with the goal of documenting the history of the University of Houston, the city of Houston, and state of Texas, as well as other historically and culturally significant materials related to the university’s teaching and research mission. Featured collections include the scrapbooks of the Ewing Family that document the suffrage activtities of Mrs. Kittridge Ewing; letters of Mrs. Anson Jones, wife of the President of the Republic of Texas from 1844 to 1846; Marine Bombing Squadron photos from World War II; photos of the Galveston hurricane of 1915; historic Houston photographs; Houstonian yearbooks; photos of the 1947 Texas City disaster; and photos of University of Houston buildings and people.
 
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Burro loaded with mining supplies, crates labeled with "Nitro Glycerine, Explosive!" and "Giant Powder, Dangerous, Handle With Care!" Back of photo features caption "I helped build Pikes Peak RR myself." H08016January 20th, 2010: Fort Collins History Connection - The Fort Collins History Connection is an online collaboration between the Fort Collins (Colo.) Museum and Discovery Science Center and the Poudre River Public Library District, incorporating historical resources from the library, the museum artifact collection, and the Fort Collins Local History Archive. The project was funded in part by a 1997–1998 LSTA grant. Fort Collins history is a microcosm of the development of the West. The settlement of the Cache La Poudre River Basin has now achieved national significance with the designation of the Cache La Poudre National Corridor. Searchable collections include historic photographs, maps, museum artifacts, city directories, oral histories, and building permits. Not all documents are available online.
 
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January 6th, 2010: The Chicago Public Library Digital Collections - The Chicago Public Library Digital Collections includes images from the library’s special collections. Highlights include construction views of Chicago’s Millennium Park, including images of the construction of the Cloud Gate (“the Bean”); a visual record of Civil War battlefields; photographs of Harold Washington, the first African-American mayor of Chicago; documents from the Chicago Renaissance (1930–1950); issues of the Chicago Examiner (1908–1918); the Chicago Sewers Collection; and pictures of Chicago neighborhoods.
 
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North Carolina Gov. Terry Sanford (left) with Attorney General-designate Robert F. Kennedy, January 6, 1961, during Sanford's inaugural ball. 741.26.a.4December 27th, 2009: Seeds of Change: The Daily Reflector Image Collection - Seeds of Change: The Daily Reflector Image Collection is one of the newest digital collections at East Carolina University’s J. Y. Joyner Library. The collection contains more than 7,000 images digitized from the photographic negatives of The Daily Reflector, the Greenville newspaper. The online collection represents only a portion of the 85,000 negatives donated by D. Jordan Whichard III, the paper’s former publisher. The majority of the photos date from 1949 to 1967 and document advances in industry, upheavals in race relations, and an increasing awareness of public health concerns. The website also has an illustrated timeline that examines the national and international events that shaped the era.
 
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December 17th, 2009: David Rumsey Map Collection Database - The David Rumsey Map Collection Database has over 21,000 maps and images online. The collection focuses on rare 18th- and 19th-century North American and South American maps and other cartographic materials. Historic maps of the World, Europe, Asia, and Africa are also represented. Popular collection categories include antique atlas, globe, school geography, maritime chart, state, county, city, pocket, wall, children’s, and manuscript maps. With Luna Imaging’s Insight software, multiple maps from different time periods can be viewed side-by-side. Viewers can also create their own collections of maps that hold particular interest by saving groups of images. Complete cataloging data accompany each image, enabling in-depth searches of the collection. Digitization of the collection began in 1996. For the first time since its launch in 1999, the website was completely redesigned and updated in 2009. A blog has been added to the site that includes entries for recent additions, news, featured maps, related sites, and videos. Over 200 historic maps from the collection can be viewed in a new browser-based version of Google Earth, and users can enter the Second Life version of the map collection directly from a dedicated Second Life portal page on the site. The collection ticker at the bottom of the home page shows the entire online map library in random order over about 10 hours. All maps can be downloaded for free directly from the site at full resolution. The larger maps generate files frequently approaching 2 GB in size; the average file size of images in the collection is 200 MB. David Rumsey is president of Cartography Associates, a digital publishing company based in San Francisco, and is chairman of Luna Imaging, a provider of enterprise software for online image collections.
 
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December 10th, 2009: Government Comics Collection at the Univeristy of Nebraska-Lincoln - The Government Comics Collection at the University of Nebraska–Lincoln is a database of more than 180 comic books and related items, such as congressional hearings dealing with comics. Through funding from UNL Undergraduate Creative Activities and Research Experiences and the Pepsi Foundation, Media Services Librarian Richard Graham worked from fall 2007 to spring 2009 to launch this collection, which continues to grow. Most of the materials he has gathered were created by governments and given to citizens or soldiers as a sort of crash course in foreign culture and relations during critical times, such as the onset of World War I. Included are documents from federal and state governments in the United States as well as comics created by the United Nations, European Union, Canada, and Ghana.
 
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December 3rd, 2009: Military Order of the Loyal Legion of the United States (MOLLUS) from the Massachusetts Commandery - The Military Order of the Loyal Legion of the United States (MOLLUS) from the Massachusetts Commandery includes some 23,000 Civil War photographs hosted by the U.S. Army Heritage and Education Center in Carlisle, Pennsylvania. This collection is considered by historians the single best Civil War photograph collection in the world. Richard J. Sommers, senior historian at AHEC, said many of the images may seem familiar, having been used extensively by authors of history books and by the editors of Civil War Times, which used to be in Harrisburg. Ken Burns and his staff spent six weeks in Carlisle going through the MOLLUS collection to pull illustrations for his popular PBS series on the Civil War. The collection was built by Gen. Albert Ordway and Col. Arnold Rand. Ordway worked in Washington, D.C., and had many connections while Rand sent out cards to Civil War veterans. Much of the collection is contained in rather ornate, leather-bound, Victorian Era albums together with a handwritten card catalog that was used to help AHEC develop a searchable database of the online images. The digitization process began in early 2007 and was just opened on the website in November. AHEC has a total of 60,000 other photographs on the Civil War and 1.7 million photographs from the Mexican War to the present.
 
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fulbrightkhrushchevNovember 25th, 2009: Senator J. W. Fulbright Speaks - Senator J. W. Fulbright Speaks. Fifty speeches delivered by Sen. James William Fulbright (1905–1995), one of the best-known Arkansans in the world, are now available on the University of Arkansas Libraries’ website. The digital library collection, titled “A Calm Voice in a Strident World: Senator J. W. Fulbright Speaks,” contains the text of selected speeches, ranging from comments he made regarding his dismissal as president of the University of Arkansas in 1941, to remarks censuring Sen. Joseph McCarthy’s far-ranging investigations, and criticisms of U.S. involvement in the war in Vietnam. The Fulbright speeches are part of the University Libraries’ digital library collections. The Special Collections Department digitized the speeches, which represent a small portion of the Fulbright Papers held by the department. Additional information on the website, including photographs, a biography, a detailed time line of Fulbright’s life, and a bibliography of materials both by and about Fulbright, provide historical context. The website also includes a link to the finding aid for the entire collection of Fulbright papers.
 
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This paper fragment was signed July 22, 1795, by William Henry Harrison from Headquarters in Greenville, Ohio, as aide-de-camp to General Anthony Wayne, authorizing 15 lbs. of mutton to be issued to Blue Jacket and the Shawnees. Om3701_6643424_001.tifNovember 18th, 2009: Ohio Memory - Ohio Memory is a collaborative effort between the Ohio Historical Society and the State Library of Ohio. Launched in 2000, the project includes 75,000 primary sources from 330 archives, historical societies, libraries, and museums that document Ohio’s past, from prehistory to the present. Specialized topics include archaeology, gay Ohio history, Ohio battle flags, Ohio governors, county atlases, state hospitals, and World War II oral histories. Do you know of a digital library collection that we can mention in this AL Direct feature? Tell us about it
 
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November 12th, 2009: CORRAL (UK Colonial Registers and Royal Navy Logbooks) - CORRAL (UK Colonial Registers and Royal Navy Logbooks) is an imaging and digitizing project funded by the Joint Information Systems Committee. The project began October 1, 2008, and was funded through September 2009, during which time its principal objective was to image ship’s logbooks of particular historic and scientific value, and to digitize the meteorological observations in those logbooks. The logs of Captains Robert Fitzroy (captain of HMS Beagle during Charles Darwin’s epic voyage around the world), James Cook, and William Bligh of HMS Bounty offer good examples. The logbooks of ships on voyages of scientific discovery and exploration are held in the UK National Archives and are stored under catalog heading ADM55. Such documents record the daily activities and weather that these intrepid explorers encountered on their voyages. As such they stand not only as records of national and historical importance, they are also a unique source of climate information from those distant years and at a time when the scientific community needs to know as much as possible concerning future and past climatic change. CORRAL has now imaged nearly 300 logbooks producing some 40,000 cataloged images, giving access to every page of these remarkable documents. The research group has three principal partners: The University of Sunderland, the UK Meteorological Office at Hadley Centre, and the British Atmospheric Data Centre.
 
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Cover of picture book Generaal Jan Klaasen, by Beata (Utrecht : Lentz & De Haan, 1896).November 5th, 2009: Dutch Picture Books - The Memory of the Netherlands portal includes a total of 650 Dutch Picture Books, 1810–1950 in this collection of digital books, which runs the gamut from Robinson Crusoe to Tielse Flipje (a cartoon mascot on De Betuwe jam-pot labels) and from old nursery rhymes to the fairy tales of the Brothers Grimm. Each successive Dutch generation grew up with its own specific children’s books, and each generation unconsciously adopted such moral standards and values as they contained. Children’s books serve as indispensable witnesses of an ever-changing society. In picture books, the images are just as important as the texts. The books are by no means intended exclusively for young children. Old picture books reflect the views people held about good and evil, poor and rich; about education, with examples of dutiful and bad behavior; about love for one’s own country and about people from foreign countries. The collection is a joint initiative of the National Library of the Netherlands, the Amsterdam Public Library, the Rotterdam Public Library, and the Deventer City Archives and Athenaeum Library.
 
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The Witch of Wapping or An Exact and Perfect Relation, of the Life and Devilish Practises of Joan Peterson, who dwelt in Spruce Island, near Wapping; Who was condemned for practising Witch-craft, and sentenced to be Hanged at Tyburn, on Munday the 11th of April, 1652. Shewing, How she Bewitch'd a Child, and rock'd the Cradle in the likenesse of a Cat; how she frighted a Baker; and how the Devil often came to suck her, sometimes in the likeness of a Dog, and at other times like a Squirrel. Together, With the Confession of Prudence Lee, who was burnt in Smithfield on Saturday the 10th of this instant for the murthering her Husband; and her Admonition and Counsel to all her Sex in general. London: T. Spring, 1652October 28th, 2009: Cornell University Library Witchcraft Collection - The Cornell University Library Witchcraft Collection is an online selecton of titles from Cornell’s extensive materials on witchcraft. The majority of the collection was acquired in the 1880s through the collaborative efforts of Andrew Dickson White, Cornell’s first president and a prodigious scholar and book buyer, and his first librarian, George Lincoln Burr. The collection is a rich source for students and scholars of the history of superstition and witchcraft persecution in Europe. It documents the earliest and the latest manifestations of the belief in witchcraft as well as its geographical boundaries, and elaborates this history with works on canon law, the Inquisition, torture, demonology, trial testimony, and narratives. Most importantly, the collection focuses on witchcraft not as folklore or anthropology, but as theology and as religious heresy. These titles were originally digitally scanned from microfilm by Primary Source Microfilm, and include 104 monographs (about 23,220 pages). 
 
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October 22nd, 2009: Edgar Allen Poe Digital Collection - The Edgar Allen Poe Digital Collection was launched to accompany the 2009 Poe Bicentennial exhibition, “From Out That Shadow: The Life and Legacy of Edgar Allan Poe,” a joint venture of the University of Texas Harry Ransom Center and the Small Special Collections Library at the University of Virginia. The digital collection incorporates images of all Poe manuscripts and letters at the Ransom Center with a selection of related archival materials, two books by Poe annotated by the author, sheet music based on his poems, and portraits from the Ransom Center collections. Poe’s manuscripts and letters are linked to transcriptions on the website of the Poe Society of Baltimore. Most of the items in the exhibition from the Harry Ransom Center collections once belonged to William H. Koester (1888–1964). Koester, a resident of Baltimore, began collecting first editions and manuscripts of Poe in the 1930s; his major acquisition was the collection of the Richmond Poe scholar and collector J. H. Whitty. In addition to the manuscripts of “The Domain of Arnheim,” “The Spectacles,” and some of Poe’s most famous poems, the Koester collection includes many letters written by and to Poe, books belonging to Poe (including the author’s annotated copies of the Tales and Poems and Eureka), and a large group of sheet music for songs based on Poe’s works.
 
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Benin leopard maskOctober 14th, 2009: Benin Empire Collection - The Benin Empire Collection: Nigerian Sculpture 1440–1897 is one of the foremost art collections at the Broward County (Fla.) Library’s African-American Research Library and Cultural Center in Fort Lauderdale. The library brings together a breathtaking collection of Royal Court Art from the ancient kingdom of Benin, located in Southern Nigeria. The Benin Kingdom, which flourished for 450 years, was founded in the early 14th century by the son of an exiled king from Ife (a nearby area approximately 100 miles southeast). The indigenous inhabitants of the Benin Kingdom, the Binis, created a thriving civilization, with museums, a well-organized military organization, efficient administration, and relative peace, stability, and prosperity throughout the kingdom.

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October 8th, 2009: Digital Library on American Slavery - The Digital Library on American Slavery offers data on race and slavery extracted from 18th- and 19th-century documents that were processed over a period of 18 years. Launched October 1 by the University of North Carolina at Greensboro, the collection contains detailed information on about 150,000 individuals. The data were painstakingly extracted from 2,975 legislative petitions and 14,512 county court petitions, and from a wide range of related documents, including wills, inventories, deeds, bills of sale, depositions, court proceedings, and amended petitions. Buried in these documents are the names and other data on roughly 80,000 individual slaves, 8,000 free people of color, and 62,000 whites, both slaveowners and non-slaveowners. One of the unique aspects of the Digital Library is the information on individual slaves made available along with additional data on their owners; no other online database connects slaves with their owners in such a manner. Each set of documents is uniquely identified by an eight-digit PAR (Petition Analysis Record) number. The list of subjects reveals the variety of “causes” or “bills of complaint,” in the language of the courts, that petitioners brought, or defendants raised, in their civil suits. The general topics include slave ownership, slave management, freedom suits, crime and punishment, health, death, social and civic life, marriage, women, and family, among others.
 
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A girl reads in the back of the Tyrrell County (N.C.) Public Library bookmobile, 1930sSeptember 30th, 2009: Transforming the Tar Heel State: Legacy of Public Libraries in NC - Transforming the Tar Heel State: The Legacy of Public Libraries in North Carolina is a statewide collaborative digital project that celebrates North Carolina public libraries. The core of this collection has been scanned from the State Library of North Carolina’s Public Library History Files. These files contain photographs, reports, newspaper clippings, and other materials that had been sent to the North Carolina Library Commission from public libraries throughout the state. The files span from the late 19th century through the 1970s, with the majority of the materials dating from the 1940s, 1950s, and 1960s. For years, the files were hidden in a storage area where all but a few library staff had forgotten them. They were rediscovered around 2003 when the storage area was being cleaned out for building renovations. In summer 2008, the state library put out a call to public libraries seeking participation in building the collection. In response, 23 libraries sent photos and 34 libraries sent historical information that was added to the collection.
 
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September 24th, 2009: Wisconsin Heritage Online - Wisconsin Heritage Online is a collaborative project with contributions from public, special, and academic libraries, historical societies, and museums from all over the state. Initiated in 2004, the site continues to grow under a grant from the Nicholas Family Foundation, which supports staff who can travel across the state to help institutions get their treasures online. Teachers, students, genealogists, history buffs, and others who value Wisconsin and its wealth of digitized materials will enjoy finding interesting or useful material.
 
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Transcript of speech by Amelia Earhart. afc1986022 ms0904September 16th, 2009: Center for Applied Linguistics Collection - The Center for Applied Linguistics Collection contains 118 hours of recordings documenting North American English dialects. The collection debuted September 10 on the Library of Congress American Memory website. The recordings include speech samples, linguistic interviews, oral histories, conversations, and excerpts from public speeches. They were drawn from various archives, and from the private collections of 50 collectors, including linguists and folklorists. The collection includes recordings from 43 states, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, and parts of Canada. They were made from 1941 to 1984, with the bulk being recorded between 1968 and 1982. Some of the recordings are by famous Americans (such as aviator Amelia Earhart, above), but most are the voices of people whose specific identities are unknown, but whose comments represent the richness of the American experience. There are Gullah speakers from coastal South Carolina, sharecroppers from Arkansas, Puerto Rican teenagers in New York City, Basque sheepherders from Colorado, Chesapeake Bay watermen, Vietnamese immigrants from Northern Virginia, and many others. 350 of the collection’s 405 recordings are available on this website; of these, 148 have accompanying transcriptions. The remaining recordings, which could not be posted due to copyright issues and other restrictions, may be heard in the American Folklife Center Reading Room in Washington, D.C.
 
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September 9th, 2009: Hooked on Los Gatos Digital Database - The Hooked on Los Gatos digital database is a collaborative effort between Los Gatos (Calif.) Public Library and the Museums of Los Gatos, with collections of the two institutions forming the core of the project. Many individuals, families, and organizations have also shared their photo archives. Collections are primarily composed of photographs, but also include maps, letters, postcards, scrapbooks, programs from events, and other materials of historic interest. Included is the Hamsher Collection of approximately 100 historic photographs, many currently hanging on the walls of Los Gatos Library. Most were copied from original images taken between the late 1860s and 1920. Clarence Hamsher was a Los Gatos banker who collected the images in the 1920s. Some images in Hooked on Los Gatos are unidentified. Research is ongoing to create accurate metadata to accompany each image as it is added to the database. Can you help identify or date any of these mystery photographs? Send an email with your facts or suggestions.
 
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Postcard showing actors Tom Foreman and Herman Forbes seated at a table in the dream night club, in a still from the 1948 movie Pitch a Boogie Woogie. The film was the only commercial production by North Carolina's first movie company, Lord-Warner Productions and was produced with an all-black cast of primarily local performers. September 3rd, 2009: Joyner Library Digital Collections - The Joyner Library Digital Collections at East Carolina University in Greenville, North Carolina, support the research and teaching mission of the university and preserve the cultural heritage of the eastern North Carolina community. The library was launched in February 2009 and now contains nearly 11,000 digital objects including image, text, audio, and video. The largest collection of materials within the library is a set of 7,000 images digitized from the photo collection of the local newspaper The Daily Reflector. Focusing on the mid-1950s to the late 1960s, the collection covers a period of dramatic social, technological, and economic change in the South as well as in the world in general. Other significant concentrations of material focus on the history of the university, naval and maritime studies, the history of agriculture in the south (particularly tobacco), and the paintings of watercolorist and poet A. R. Ammons.
 
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Perseus and Cepheus, Collection of The J. Paul Getty Museum, Malibu, CaliforniaAugust 27th, 2009: Perseus Digital Library - Perseus Digital Library at Tufts Univeristy, Boston. Since initial planning in 1985, the Perseus Digital Library Project has explored what happens when libraries move online. Over two decades later, as new forms of publication emerge and millions of books become digital, this question is more pressing than ever. Perseus is a practical experiment in which users explore possibilities and challenges of digital collections in a networked world. Perseus’ flagship collection, under development since 1987, covers the history, literature, and culture of the Greco-Roman world. Perseus’ mission is to help make the full record of humanity as intellectually accessible as possible to every human being, providing information adapted to as many linguistic and cultural backgrounds as possible. The website showcases collections and services developed as a part of Tufts University research efforts over the years. The code for the digital library system and many of the collections are available for other institutions to use, mirror, and develop….
 
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August 20th, 2009: Minnesota Reflections - Minnesota Reflections is the first online project of the Minnesota Digital Library Coalition. MDLC, which is comprised of professionals from libraries, archives, historical societies, and museums across Minnesota, is creating a digital collection of the state’s unique resources and special collections. Minnesota Reflections is a collection of more than 40,000 images and documents depicting the history of Minnesota. More than 100 institutions including historical societies, public libraries, special archives, universities, and colleges have shared their original materials with the Minnesota Digital Library. The collection is funded by an LSTA grant through the State Library Services and School Technology division of the Minnesota Department of Education, and by the time and talent of the participants in the Minnesota Digital Library Coalition.
 
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A swarm of monarch butterflies, from Monarch WatchAugust 12th, 2009: National Science Digital Library - The National Science Digital Library was created in 2000 by the National Science Foundation to provide organized access to high-quality resources and tools that support innovations in teaching and learning at all levels of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) education. As a national network of learning environments, resources, and partnerships, NSDL seeks to serve a vital role as STEM educational cyberlearning for the nation, meeting the informational and technological needs of educators and learners at all levels. NSDL is designed primarily for K-16 educators, but anyone can access NSDL.org and search the library at no cost. Access to most resources discovered through NSDL is free; however, some content providers may require a login, or a nominal fee or subscription to retrieve their specific resources. In October 2008, management and coordination of the NSDL through 2012 was granted to the NSDL Resource Center at the University Corporation for Atmospheric Research; and Technical Network Services, a collaborative effort between Cornell University, the University Corporation for Atmospheric Research, and the University of Colorado at Boulder.
 
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August 6th, 2009: Scottsdale (Ariz.) Public Library Digital Collection - The Scottsdale (Ariz.) Public Library digital collection offers access to digital images of cultural and historical interest to Scottsdale residents as well as to students and researchers. The collection showcases the history and growth of what has changed from a small farming community into a world-class city. At present, the collection’s time period spans the late 1800s to the mid-20th century and contains digital versions of increasingly valuable, fragile, and hard-to-use originals of people, places, and things pertaining to the city of Scottsdale, Arizona.
 
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Color photograph of damage to Bienville Hall, University of New Orleans Lakefront Campus following Hurricane Katrina, Sept. 14, 2005. Louisiana Hurricane Resources collectionJuly 30th, 2009: The Louisiana Digital Library - The Louisiana Digital Library is an online library containing photographs, maps, manuscript materials, books, oral histories, and more that document Louisiana’s history and culture. There are currently 19 participating libraries, archives, museums, and historical centers participating in the LDL. Each institution contributes the digital items and descriptive text for its collections. Selected collections include Louisiana Hurricane Resources, Louisiana State Museum Jazz Collection, Ogden Museum of Southern Art, Jesuit Scrapbooks from the New Orleans Province, Louisiana Purchase and Louisiana Colonial History, and Mississippi River Flood of 1927 Photographs. The library can be browsed by subject, institution, media format, geographic focus, time period, and collection name. LOUIS: the Louisiana Library Network, provides technological support for the institutions who participate.
 
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July 23rd, 2009: On the Edge: The Hidden Art of Fore-Edge Book Painting - On the Edge: The Hidden Art of Fore-Edge Book Painting highlights a special collection of more than 200 high-resolution images of fore-edge paintings housed in the Rare Books Department of the Boston Public Library. The books and images on the site can be explored in a variety of ways, either by wandering through the main gallery, or browsing the works by subject, book title, or painting title. The featured works section provides additional information about selected books, including detail shots and a video of the book as it is fanned to display the hidden artwork. Anywhere on the site, you may click on an image to view a larger version. A series of articles, written by leading experts in the field, provide historical and curatorial insight into fore-edge painting. A full-text search feature is also provided. This online collection was made possible by a generous gift from Anne and David Bromer. The website concept was developed by Tom Blake and Scot Colford. Website programming and design by Josh Boughey. High-resolution photography was done at the Boston Public Library’s digital-imaging studio. Descriptive information was captured and created by Jay Campbell and Leslie Burmeister.
 
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Cochin-Chinese soldier, 1844. Hand-col. wood-engr.; standing uniform figure with rifle, leaning on wall. CchU1844sf-1 (ASK Brown Call No.)July 16th, 2009: Anne S. K. Brown Military Collection - The Brown University Library’s Anne S. K. Brown Military Collection is the foremost American collection of material devoted to the history and iconography of soldiers and soldiering, and is one of the world’s largest collections devoted to the study of military and naval uniforms. Brown’s Center for Digital Initiatives is digitizing 15,000 individual prints, drawings, and watercolors from the collection, including works by William Hogarth, Sir John Millais, Jean Baptiste Antoine de Verger, and many others. Treasures include one of the earliest depictions of an African-American soldier, painted by de Verger circa 1780, and sepia images of veterans of Napoleon’s Grande Armée in their original uniforms and insignia. The earliest pictures in the collection date from the 16th century, and the most recent items include over 1,600 paintings, drawings, and watercolors depicting World War II by artists who served in the United States armed forces.
 
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Antoine Watteau, Italian Comedians, c. 1720July 8th, 2009: WorldImages Database - The internationally recognized WorldImages database provides access to the California State University IMAGE Project. It contains almost 75,000 images, is global in coverage, and includes all areas of visual imagery. WorldImages is accessible anywhere and its images may be freely used for non-profit educational purposes. The images can be located using many search techniques, and for convenience they are organized into more than 800 portfolios which are then organized into subject groupings. A Flash player plug-in allows you to view many of the images in large size and high resolution.
 
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Dhow Zam Zam under sail. Winterton Collection of East African Photographs, Melville J. Herskovits Library of African Studies, Northwestern University, Evanston. Object 36-1-13. 1 July, 2009July 2nd, 2009: East African Photos: Humphrey Winterton Collection - The Humphrey Winterton Collection of East African Photographs, Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois, includes over 7,600 photographs organized in 76 separate albums, scrapbooks, or loose collections, replicating how British collector Humphrey Winterton organized the collection. The photographs depict life, primarily in East Africa, between about 1860 and 1960. Assembled by Winterton over about 30 years, the collection depicts the breadth of African experience and also documents African life, European life in Africa in all its manifestations, and the African landscape, in particular as it changed over time. Included are photos showing the building of East Africa’s railways, the growth of its urban centers, and the development of European colonial administration. The photographs extensively document rural life as well as the travels and work of European colonial officials and private businessmen. There are outstanding examples of portraiture, some of which were taken by commercial studios. The Winterton Collection provides an unsurpassed resource for the study of the history of photography in East Africa.
 
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African American musicians stand on a curved staircase in Omaha's Orpheum Theatre playing musical instruments in this 8June 25th, 2009: Nebraska Memories - Nebraska Memories is a cooperative project to digitize Nebraska-related historical and cultural heritage materials and make them freely available to researchers of all ages. The site uses CONTENTdm software to house digital collections created by Nebraska libraries. The Keene Memorial Library in Fremont, the Polley Music Library in Lincoln City, Alegent Health Immanuel Hospital, the Bess Streeter Aldrich House and Museum, the Lincoln Police Department, Omaha Community Playhouse, and the Durham Museum are some of the contributors. The database currently contains approximately 3,500+ digitized items and continues to grow each month. At this time searchers can find material from the 1890s to the 1970s. The Nebraska Memories website is owned by the Nebraska Library Commission.
 
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A confrontation between an unidentified African American man and an Ohio National Guard soldier on Wooster Avenue during the July 18, 1968, riot in Akron, Ohio. From the Akron Beacon Journal photo filesJune 18th, 2009: Summit Memory - Summit Memory is an online scrapbook capturing the history of Summit County, Ohio. Administered by the Akron–Summit County Public Library, the site is a county-wide collaborative project with gateways to such collections as Akron Remembers 1968 (above), the Trucking History Collection, the Summit County Civil War Collection, the Akron Banknotes Collection, the Firestone and B. F. Goodrich Tire and Rubber Collections, the Doodlebug Train Disaster Collection, and the David P. Campbell Postcard Collection. The project is funded by a grant from the Robert W. Little Foundation. Little (1917–2000) served as a librarian at the Akron-Summit County Public Library for nearly 30 years.
 
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Glass negative of a photograph by Charles Belden. Photo is of a man crouching next to a white horse with Hope Williams standing next to him, Pitchfork Ranch, Wyoming. Charles J. Belden Photographs, Accession Number 00598, University of Wyoming, American Heritage CenterJune 11th, 2009: Wyoming Memory Portal - The Wyoming Memory Portal brings the histories of Wyoming to life through a virtual gateway to the state’s rich collections of manuscripts, books, photographs, documents, newspapers, maps, audio, video, and other resources. These sources document Wyoming’s past from prehistory through the present. Collections and exhibits are provided by archives, libraries, historical societies, museums, governments, organizations, and individuals from throughout Wyoming. the site is hosted by the University of Wyoming Libraries. One collection includes images from the 1920s and 1930s of Charles J. Belden’s Pitchfork Ranch near Meeteetse, Wyoming. Photographs include depictions of everyday life on the ranch, raising antelopes, dude ranching, and Belden’s family members.
 
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Carte de visite for journalist and African explorer Henry Morton Stanley (1841-1904), in the dress he wore when he met David Livingstone in Africa. SIL28-277-01June 3rd, 2009: Galaxy of Images - The Smithsonian Institution Libraries’ Galaxy of Images collection includes thousands of images representing a small portion of the more than 1.5-million printed books and manuscripts in their collections. Images are browsable or searchable by keyword or topics that include the animal world, art and design, bones and fossils, history and material culture, literature, the natural world, plants and flowers, portraits, science and invention, scientific instruments and apparatus, society and culture, technology and transportation, and trade literature. The libraries encourage the use of images and other content from this website for not-for-profit educational and classroom use.
 
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Around 1947, the famous Budweiser Clydesdale horses visited Luigi Del Frate's Palms Beer Garden and Grocery. In this photo, the businessman (on the right) poses with two of his associates with the Clydesdales in front of his business. Nicholas P. Ciotola Italians in Albuquerque Pictorial Collection, 1884-1970. 2002-020-0086May 27th, 2009: New Mexico’s Digital Collections - The University of New Mexico Libraries hosts New Mexico’s Digital Collections. The collections contain documents, photographs, maps, posters, art, and music. Topics include New Mexico history, water and land issues, and Latin American art and politics. Participating repositories include the Center for Southwest Research, Fray Angélico Chávez History Library, the Palace of the Governors photo archives, the Silver City Museum, and the Tamarind Institute.
 
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Cover of White Pine News, Christmas edition, 1906May 20th, 2009: Cooperative Libraries Automated Network - The Cooperative Libraries Automated Network, operated by the Nevada State Library and Archives in Carson City, has begun digitizing its collection of state newspapers. One of the collections is the White Pine News, published in Ely from 1881 to 1906, which contains much valuable information on the copper, silver, and gold mines of the region, as well as everyday life in the Great Basin. Other papers include the Wadsworth Dispatch and the Reese River Reveille.
 
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Bogorodica Eleusa, image of the virgin and child, from the Mount AThos Monastery of Simonopetra, 1836. GM-314-17.May 14th, 2009: Digital National Library of Serbia - The Digital National Library of Serbia offers thousands of Cyrillic books and manuscripts online through an English interface. Collections are divided into manuscripts, epic national poetry, old printed books, old and rare books, books, newspapers and magazines, cartographic materials, engravings and art material, photographs, posters, printed music and sound recordings, and miscellanea. One interesting collection is the graphics from the Mount Athos Monasteries of Chilandar, Vatoped, Simonopetra, and Kutlumuš. During the 1880s and 1890s, the National Library of Serbia, in cooperation with the monks from the Monastery Chilandar and Chilandar Council in Belgrade, started a project to reproduce the halographic original 18th- and 19th-century carved plates and copperplate engravings from Sveta Gora. All materials are housed in the National Library of Serbia in Belgrade.
 
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frontera_index.jpgMay 7th, 2009: Strachwitz Frontera’s Mexican and Mexican-American Recordings - The Arhoolie Foundation’s Strachwitz Frontera Collection of Mexican and Mexican-American Recordings (the Frontera Collection) is the largest repository of Mexican and Mexican-American vernacular recordings in existence. With funding from Los Tigres del Norte Foundation, the UCLA Chicano Studies Research Center has sponsored the digitization of the first section of the collection by the Arhoolie Foundation. These performances were recorded primarily in the United States and Mexico and issued on 78 rpm phonograph recordings during the first half of the 20th century. This vast digitized collection of approximately 30,000 recordings is now available to researchers and the general public. In 2006, the Arhoolie Foundation received a grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities to digitize an additional 20,000 performances from the collection of 45 rpm phonograph recordings. Approximately half of these additional recordings are available (as of April 2009) with the remainder to be added to the website in the next few months. This represents less than half of the 45 rpm discs in the collection and further funding will be required to complete the project. Full access to the archive is only available to UCLA patrons, but the rest of us can listen to 50 seconds of each song, look at the record labels, and read the background information. Music is browsable by genre, subject, label, and name.

 
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sirena.jpgApril 29th, 2009: Printer’s Devices Database - The Printer’s Devices Database of the Library of the University of Barcelona, Spain, was launched in October 1998. The database covers the 16th through the 18th century and all of Europe, but mostly Spain, France, Italy, Portugal, Germany, and the Low Countries, reflecting the collection’s own personality. Each entry of the database includes information of the printers’ activity, the years and places in which they worked, and other remarkable biographical facts. The records also contain information about the marks they used, including a description of the mark, and the main keywords in Catalan, Spanish, and English. The database is updated on a monthly basis. In March 2009, it contained 1,372 printer files and 2,182 device images.
 
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world.gifApril 22nd, 2009: World Digital Library - The World Digital Library, launched April 21, makes it possible to discover, study, and enjoy cultural treasures from around the world on one site. These treasures include, but are not limited to, manuscripts, maps, rare books, musical scores, recordings, films, prints, photographs, and architectural drawings. Items on the site may easily be browsed by place, time, topic, type of item, and contributing institution, or can be located by an open-ended search in several languages. Special features include interactive geographic clusters, a timeline, and advanced image-viewing and interpretive capabilities. Item-level descriptions and interviews with curators about featured items provide additional information. Navigation tools and content descriptions are provided in Arabic, Chinese, English, French, Portuguese, Russian, and Spanish. Many more languages are represented in the actual books, manuscripts, maps, photographs, and other primary materials, which are provided in their original languages. The collection was developed by a team at the U.S. Library of Congress, with contributions by partner institutions in many countries; the support of UNESCO; and the financial support of a number of companies and private foundations. BibliOdyssey has a nice selection of illustrations (with descriptions) from the World Digital Library.
 
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Sheet music for Kalamazoo, an original rag-time cake-walk by Edward Desenberg. 780 M62 No 19900001April 15th, 2009: Seeking Michigan - Seeking Michigan, launched in March by the state’s Department of History, Arts, and Libraries, is a growing collection of digitized documents, maps, films, images, oral histories, and artifacts that creatively tells the stories of Michigan’s families, homes, businesses, communities, and landscapes. Its first major accomplishment was the addition of some 1 million death records covering the years 1897 through 1920; these records are indexed by name, death date, location, and age. Other special collections include more than 100,000 pages of Civil War documents; some 10,000 photographs; a variety of Michigan sheet music; background on the state’s 44 governors; Works Progress Administration data on land and buildings throughout rural Michigan; photographs and postcards of 120 lighthouses and life-saving stations in the state; and thousands of maps in the state archives. The Library of Michigan and Archives of Michigan began work on this site in 2008.
 
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Snowshoe rabbit, from the Journal of MammalogyApril 8th, 2009: The Aldo Leopold Archives - The Aldo Leopold Archives, University of Wisconsin Digital Collections. Aldo Leopold (1887–1948) is considered the most influential conservation thinker of the 20th century. He is most widely known as the author of A Sand County Almanac, one of the most respected books about the environment ever published. The Leopold Collection houses the raw materials that document not only his rise to prominence but also the history of conservation and the emergence of the field of ecology. The archive is augmented by correspondence and related materials carefully retained over the years by his mother, his wife, and other family members and professional associates; these span his entire life, but are most rich and voluminous for his early years. The Leopold Collection serves scholars, policy leaders, and the general public who look to Leopold for insight and inspiration in dealing with complex conservation challenges facing 21st-century society.
 
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Choctaw ball game, from Les peintres indiens d'Amérique. Record 248April 1st, 2009: C. Szwedzicki: The North American Indian Works - C. Szwedzicki: The North American Indian Works is a collection of 364 images and six texts hosted by the University of Cincinnati Libraries. Between 1929 and 1952 C. Szwedzicki, a publisher in Nice, France, produced six portfolios of North American Indian art. The publications were edited by American scholars Oscar Brousse Jacobson, Hartley Burr Alexander, and Kenneth Milton Chapman. Many of the images were published as pochoir prints, which are similar in appearance to silk-screen prints. These works represent original works by 20th-century American Indian artists. Important documentation of the Battle of the Little Big Horn is provided in the reproduction of the now lost ledger art of Amos Bad Heart Bull. The contents of this collection are drawn primarily from holdings of the Archives and Rare Books Library of the University of Cincinnati Libraries, but also include materials from the Public Library of Cincinnati and Hamilton County and the Yale Collection of Western Americana. Users must allow Java and pop-ups for this collection site.
 
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Fruit and nuts exhibit showing an elephant made of English walnuts, California Building, Alaska-Yukon-Pacific-Exposition, Seattle, Washington, 1909. Photo by Frank H. Nowell. PH Coll 727.264March 26th, 2009: 1909 Alaska-Yukon-Pacific Exposition - 1909 Alaska-Yukon-Pacific Exposition. The more than 1,200 photographs from this exposition document the fair, held on the Seattle campus of the University of Washington during the summer of 1909. Images include depictions of the buildings, grounds, entertainment, and exotic attractions at the fair. The fair shaped the UW campus in ways that are visible today, creating the Rainier Vista and Drumheller Fountain. For many years, some of the former fair buildings were used by the university; today only Architecture Hall and Cunningham Hall remain. The information for the collection was researched and prepared by the UW Libraries Special Collections Division and Cataloging staff in 1999. Not all the photographs from the collection were included in this database, which consists of 655 digital images chosen from a larger group of photographic prints and postcards. The images were scanned in grayscale using a Microtek Scanmaker 9600L and saved in JPEG format. The original collection resides in the UW Libraries Special Collections Division as the Alaska-Yukon-Pacific Exposition Collection.
 
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Fort Worth (Tex.) Public Library Bookmobile, March 19th, 2009: The Postcard Library - The Postcard Library celebrates the rich history of United States Libraries through postcards. The collection, most of which belongs to University of Wisconsin-Madison library school students Sharon McQueen and Richard Douglas Wambold, has been built over many years with the help of friends, antique shops, flea markets, and eBay. The website is intended to draw interest to the rich and diverse history of libraries in the United States and serve as a catalyst for further exploration. The site is constantly expanding, and the designers are exploring ways to support their work toward adding metadata records to the images.
 
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World Trade Organization protestors with banner, November 29, 1999. 19991129.01 #11. Seattle Municipal ArchivesMarch 11th, 2009: Seattle Municipal Archives - Seattle’s digital-document libraries are a resource for teachers and students of Washington State history. They contain digital representations of primary-source documents on such topics as the Great Seattle Fire of 1889, the 1909 Alaska-Yukon-Pacific Exposition, unemployment and the WPA, and the World Trade Organization protests. Although the geographic focus is Seattle, the topics reflect events at the state and national levels. Both documents and images are included in the archives.
 
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Engraved portrait of Field Marshal von Blücher, Prince of Wahlstadt, on his horse at the Battle of Waterloo; from papers relating to the 'History of the captivity of Napoleon at St Helena' by William Forsyth. Held by the British Library.March 4th, 2009: The European Library - The European Library offers free access to the resources of the 48 national libraries of Europe in 20 languages. Currently, the European Library gives access to 150 million items across Europe. The amount of referenced digital collections is constantly increasing. The library provides a vast virtual collection of material from all disciplines and offers visitors simple access to European cultural resources. The European Library is a noncommercial organization available to anyone around the world seeking books, maps, photographs, music, videos, and other materials. Participating institutions are all members of the Conference of European National Librarians (CENL), a foundation aiming at increasing and reinforcing the role of national libraries in Europe.
 
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A Freedom Summer worker and an African American Child, September 1964. The two are smiling for the picture while sitting on the porch of the Ruleville (Miss.) Community Center.February 26th, 2009: The Mississippi Digital Library - The Mississippi Digital Library is the cooperative digital library program for the state. It provides access to primary-source materials, covering a wide range of subject areas, from Mississippi museums, archives, libraries, and historical societies. These materials, physically located throughout the state, are brought virtually together on the library website. Funded by the Institute of Museum and Library Services, the library began in December 2003 as a partnership between the University of Southern Mississippi, Delta State University, the University of Mississippi, Tougaloo College, Jackson State University, and the Mississippi Department of Archives and History. The collaboration originally focused on materials associated with the Civil Rights era but now includes items from pre-Civil War to present.
 
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Sgt. Weiss entertains Chinese lad with Y-Force in China long time. Clipping from March 29, 1945February 18th, 2009: Nazareth (Pa.) Veteran’s Digital Project - The Nazareth (Pa.) Veteran’s Digital Project. The Memorial Library of Nazareth and Vicinity has added the contents of a scrapbook kept during World War II to the Access Pennsylvania Digital Repository. The scrapbook contains more than 1,000 pictures of area servicemen and women who served during the war. In 2005, a photocopy of the scrapbook was given to the library. Because of its fragile nature, the library decided to digitize the collection and make it accessible on its website. A grant sponsored by state Rep. Richard T. Grucela made it possible for the library to have the scrapbook digitized by the OCLC Preservation Service Center in Bethlehem, Pennsylvania. Director Lynn Snodgrass-Pilla applied to the Office of Commonwealth Libraries to have the digital scrapbook included in the Access Pennsylvania Digital Repository, which encourages a collaborative partnership among the state’s libraries, historical societies, museums, and other institutions.
 
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Postcard of the North Adams (Mass.) Public LibraryFebruary 13th, 2009: Postcard Collection of J. Stewart Roberts Assn. - The Postcard Collection of J. Stewart Roberts Associates, Architects, of Somerville, Massachusetts, originated with Stewart Roberts, who began collecting cards depicting New England library buildings for which he had provided architectural services. Christian Schaller, an associate with the firm in Chicago, has added his own collection of Midwest library postcards. The collection has recently been expanded to include two more library postcard collections: The Nelle Webb Collection, of the Bloomington (Ill.) Public Library, includes 260 library postcards from 1900 to the 1930s; and the collection of Judith Holliday, a former Cornell University fine arts librarian who collected cards mailed from students during their travels. Parts of the Nelle Webb Collection are missing, and the firm is actively working to reassemble this collection, physically or at least virtually if images can be shared.
 
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Pachtuwa-Chta, An Arikara Warrior (1839), Hand-colored aquatint drawn by Karl Bodmer (1809-1893). J. Willard Marriott Library, University of Utah. uu_vig27 February 4th, 2009: Mountain West Digital Library - The Mountain West Digital Library is an aggregation of digital collections from universities, colleges, public libraries, museums, and historical societies in Utah, Nevada, and Idaho. Hosting institutions each run servers supporting their own digital collections and support partner institutions by providing scanning and hosting services. The Mountain West defines the region of contributors, but the content extends beyond the Mountain West and into different fields. Visit them at http://mwdl.org.
 
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A Bostonian's idea of the United States of America, by Daniel K. Wallingford (1935). G3701.A67 1935 .W3January 29th, 2009: The Norman B. Leventhal Map Center - The Norman B. Leventhal Map Center at the Boston Public Library created this website in 2006 with the goal of bringing its collection of rare maps and atlases into the hands of patrons of all ages. To date, more than 2,200 maps have been digitized and added to the site, complete with authoritative metadata. Additional maps are added on a monthly basis. With the special “zoomify” tool that accompanies each map, users are able to examine small details. The website also features teacher resources, a “maps in the news” feature, and a digital archive of all exhibits held at the Leventhal Center.
 
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A reconstruction of the scene in the death-pit at the Royal Cemetery at Ur. The persons and objects are drawn in the positions in which their remains were found. Illustrated London News illustration reproduced as Plate 30 in Joint Expedition of the British Museum and of the Museum of the University of Pennsylvania to Mesopotamia: Ur Excavations, Vol. II, Plates (1927)January 21st, 2009: ETANA (Electronic Tools and Ancient Near Eastern Archives) - ETANA (Electronic Tools and Ancient Near Eastern Archives) is a cooperative effort to include the permanent archiving, dissemination, and generation of archaeological excavation reports, editions of ancient and modern texts, core early monographs, dictionaries, journals, and reports on archaeology in the Ancient Near East. It offers the ABZU portal to Near Eastern web resources, an electronic commons where scholars in the field can share data and images, and eventually an electronic publishing depository for born digital publications. The Vanderbilt University Library serves as the host technical site and grant administrator. Other organizations supporting ETANA include the University of Chicago’s Oriental Institute (which hosts the ABZU portal), the American Schools of Oriental Research, and Case Western Reserve University Library.
 
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A Happy Family at the California Alligator Farm, Los Angeles, Calif., ca. 1907. A young man poses next to an alligator lying in the grass near a pond, with many more alligators lying or swimming along the shore. The California Alligator Farm, located at 3627 Mission Road adjacent to Lincoln Park, was owned by Francis Earnest and his partner Joe Campbell.January 14th, 2009: Loyola Marymount University Digital Library Program - The Loyola Marymount University Digital Library Program was launched December 15 as the result of a 2007 LSTA grant from the California State Library. The grant funded the digitization of 200 postcards from the Werner Von Boltenstern collection in the university’s Von der Ahe Library in Los Angeles. This and other postcards in the special collections department make up “The Changing Face of Southern California: A History in Postcards.” A second online collection consists of photographs and other materials from the J. D. Black Papers, recording the American West in the Owens Valley of California from 1875 to 1930, including rare photos of the famous Owens Valley Water Controversy in the 1920s between the valley and Los Angeles over a key resource in the West, water. A third collection, “The Atrium: Iconic Images from Loyola Marymount University” is in the works.
 
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Broadside illustrated with drawing of human body promoting exhibition, Dec. 4-5, 1896, of a petrified man, found by W. M. Buff, near Saluda River, five miles north of Columbia, in Lexington County, South Carolina, November 10th, 1895. The broadside claimed that the body was that of a British solder from the Revolutionary War. From the University of South Carolina broadsides collectionJanuary 7th, 2009: South Carolina Digital Library - The South Carolina Digital Library is a collaborative effort that includes South Carolina’s schools, libraries, archives, museums, and other cultural heritage institutions. Its mission is to encourage collaborators to create, maintain, and promote digital collections that represent South Carolina’s historical and cultural resources while following state-level guidelines that are based on national standards and best practices. Participating institutions include Beaufort County Library, Clemson University, the University of South Carolina, and the College of Charleston. SCDL includes several lesson plans, among them: African Americans Seen through the Eyes of the Newsreel Cameraman, Broadsides from the Colonial Era to the Present, and Phillis Wheatley’s poetry.
 
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Monastery of St. John the Theologian, Attica, Greece, 1932. From the Dorothy Burr Thompson photo collectionDecember 30th, 2008: American School of Classical Studies at Athens - In 2006 the American School of Classical Studies at Athens received European Union funds to showcase its unique treasures via the internet in order to promote classical and post-classical Hellenic studies to a broader international public. Within the framework of the Information Society Operational Program, the American School digitized a significant part of its collections. More than 400,000 items, scanned and cataloged, are now available online for consultation and study. The digitized material includes the scrapbooks of Joannes Gennadius (1844–1932), which contain photographs and documents on the long diplomatic career and scholarly preoccupations of the founder of the Gennadius Library; the correspondence of politician Ion Dragoumis (1878–1920); the photographic albums of Dorothy Burr Thompson (1900–2001), one of the most distinguished American archaeologists of the 20th century; a significant number of photographs from the historical archives of the Gennadius Library; and excavation records, photographs and drawings covering the entire duration of the School’s excavations at Corinth (1896 to the present).
 
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Headline, December 17th, 2008: Chronicling America - The Chronicling America website is a project of the National Digital Newspaper Program, a partnership between the National Endowment for the Humanities and the Library of Congress to provide enhanced access to American newspapers. Over a period of approximately 20 years, NDNP will create a national digital resource of historically significant newspapers from all the states and territories published between 1836 and 1922. This searchable database will be permanently maintained at the Library of Congress and be freely accessible via the internet. On December 11, the NDNP added 183,698 historic newspaper pages (including 14 new titles) to the site, which accesses 864,509 pages from 108 titles that were published in nine states (California, Florida, Kentucky, Minnesota, Nebraska, New York, Texas, Utah, and Virginia) and the District of Columbia between 1880 and 1910. Six additional states (Arizona, Hawaii, Missouri, Ohio, Pennsylvania, and Washington) will be contributing content in 2009.
 
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Unknown Indian man with car, 1916-1920, Winslow, ArizonaDecember 10th, 2008: The Arizona Memory Project - The Arizona Memory Project is an online effort to provide access to the wealth of primary sources in Arizona libraries, archives, museums, and other cultural institutions. This initiative provides the opportunity to view some of the best examples of government documents, photographs, maps, and objects that chronicle Arizona’s past and present. The project was launched in March 2006 and has been granted the Arizona Centennial 2012 legacy project designation by the Arizona Historical Advisory Commission in support of the Arizona State Centennial Celebration. This is an OAI-compliant digital library and a registered data contributor on OAIster.org and the Open Archives Initiative.
 
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Gold coin of Emperor Claudius, A.D. 50-54, 18 mm, 7.64 grams, minted in RomeDecember 3rd, 2008: U of Virginia Art Museum Numismatic Collection - The University of Virginia Art Museum Numismatic Collection contains nearly 600 coins of Greek and Roman origin. The coins were generally acquired in small lots that were purchased or donated from 1987 to 2001, but larger groups of coins belonging to English hoards were also acquired, including 51 from the Normanby Hoard and 302 from the Oliver’s Orchard Hoards. About 450 of the coins are from the Roman Republic or Empire, providing a broad sample from the late 3rd century B.C. to the late 3rd century A.D., including more than 100 coins from the breakaway Gallic Empire of A.D. 260–274. Many of the coins are in poor condition, but digitization provides access to those that are too fragile to be handled by students and scholars of numismatics. In October 2007, funding was received from the University of Virginia Library to work in conjunction with the Art Museum and a Roman numismatics class taught by Professor John Dobbins in the Classical Art and Archaeology program, and scanning of the coins in the Art Museum commenced shortly thereafter. The collection was described in Encoded Archival Description (EAD), with several coin-specific adaptations to describe physical attributes such as legends and iconography. In addition to EAD’s capability of describing the physical attributes of each object in the collection, administrative history, essays, and index terms can be encoded in XML to create completely comprehensive metadata for those students and scholars of numismatics to use as a tool in their research.
 
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Apollo 11 Astronaut assembling seismic experiment, July 20, 1969, from Apollo Image Atlas, AS11-40-5946November 26th, 2008: Lunar Atlases - The Lunar and Planetary Institute’s collection of online lunar atlases includes a digital version of the Lunar Orbiter Atlas of the Moon, first published in 1971 and considered the definitive reference manual to global photographic coverage of the Moon; the 1967 Consolidated Lunar Atlas by Gerald P. Kuiper, Ewen A. Whitaker, Robert G. Strom, John W. Fountain, and Stephen M. Larson, a collection of the best photographic images of the Moon; an Apollo Image Atlas with some 25,000 photographs from the Apollo 4–17 missions; panoramic surface images from the Apollo missions; photos from the 1964–1965 Ranger 7–9 missions; and various other map series, including geologic, topographic, and topophoto maps.
 
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Airship No.5 of French inventor and fashion plate Alberto Santos-Dumont reaching the Eiffel Tower in his attempt to win the Deutsch Prize, July 1901. (The airship crashed on the return trip.) Life magazine Photo ArchiveNovember 19th, 2008: Life Magazine’s Photo Archive - Life magazine’s Photo Archive, consisting of more than 10 million images, is now available on a new hosted image service from Google. Some 97% of the photographs have never been seen by the public. The collection contains some of the most iconic images of the 20th century, including works from photojournalists Alfred Eisenstaedt, Margaret Bourke-White, Gordon Parks, and W. Eugene Smith. The images can be found when conducting a Google or Google Image search. Users can also search through the Life collection directly. All keywords are translated into 16 different languages. Life’s complete Photo Archive is available on Google free for personal and research purposes, but copyright and ownership of all images remains with Time Inc. The Photo Archive also includes the Zapruder film of the Kennedy assassination; the Mansell Collection from London; Dahlstrom glass plates of New York and environs from the 1880s; Hugo Jaeger images from Nazi-era Germany, 1937–1944; DMI red-carpet celebrity shots; Pix Inc. personalities; and the entire works left to the collection from Life photographers Alfred Eisenstaedt, Gjon Mili, and Nina Leen.
 
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Weird Tales magazine, from Treasures of the NYPL video seriesNovember 13th, 2008: New York Public Library Digital Gallery - The New York Public Library Digital Gallery provides free and open access to over 640,000 images digitized from NYPL’s vast collections, including illuminated manuscripts, historical maps, vintage posters, rare prints, and photographs. A recently redesigned web interface offers more customizable options, fewer popup windows, and a completely CSS-driven page layout that will guarantee flexibility in future versions in displaying the site’s content on a variety of devices like PDAs and mobile phones. New images are highlighted weekly as Digital Gallery Picks. Choices in the item view are now arranged according to the things you might want to do: find related images, browse related sources, see more metadata, or interact with an image. Image metadata (in the Dublin Core format) is now embedded in each item page. There is also support for the CoolIris browser extension that allows the user to view any image search in the Digital Gallery as an immersive slideshow. In addition, the NYPL site features a video series showcasing Treasures of the New York Public Library, in which curators and librarians share their passion for the NYPL special collections.
 
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The Boston Slave Riot, and Trial of Anthony Burns. Boston: Fetridge and Company, 1854. The publication presents the fugitive slave case of Anthony Burns and recounts the riot that took place in Boston in response to the decision to return him to his captors.November 5th, 2008: Slavery and Abolition in the U.S. - Slavery and Abolition in the U.S.: Select Publications of the 1800s is a collaborative project between Dickinson College in Carlisle, Pennsylvania, and Millersville University of Pennsylvania that consists of digitized books and pamphlets demonstrating the varying ideas and beliefs about slavery in the United States throughout the 19th century. The collection includes more than 70 titles published between 1787 and 1911 with some 15,000 individual pages of text and searchable transcriptions. Materials were drawn from the Special Collections holdings at both partner institutions and utilize CONTENTdm digital collection management software. The collaborative project was funded in part by LSTA digitization grants and is freely available to the global community.
 
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gdz.jpgOctober 29th, 2008: The Center for Retrospective Digitization - The Center for Retrospective Digitization at the Göttingen State and University Library in Lower Saxony, Germany, offers some 5 million digital pages from historic books, maps, and periodicals. It was founded in 1997 as a department of the library sponsored by the German Research Foundation and since then has served as a national digital repository. Collections include autobiographies, works in the humanities and sciences, maps, mathematical literature, North American literature (primarily German-language), Sibirica, travel literature, and zoologica. Two separate viewing platforms are offered, along with separate metadata pages, and a PDF downloader. One special feature is a digital version of Göttingen’s copy of a Gutenberg Bible.
 
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Dancers in William Lee's School, Georgetown, D.C., ca. 1919. National Photo Company glass negative.October 22nd, 2008: Shorpy Higginbotham - Shorpy is an online archive of thousands of high-resolution photos from the 1850s to 1950s. Its namesake, Shorpy Higginbotham, was a teenager who worked in an Alabama coal mine 100 years ago. The site is actually a blog that posts photos on a daily basis and keeps them archived and searchable. Each photo links to a high-resolution image. Most of the photos on the site were extracted from reference images (high-resolution TIFF files, 20 to 200 megabytes in size) from the Library of Congress research archive. Most were digitized by LC contractors using a Sinar studio back. They were adjusted by the Shorpy webmaster for contrast and color before being downsized and turned into JPEGs.
 
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View of Bennett Avenue from Second (2nd) Street during fire of April 25, 1896, Cripple Creek, Colorado; large crowd of men, women and children are gathered on both sides of street's boardwalk; numerous horse- drawn wagons and carriages, many being loaded with personal belongings or commercial goods, are in the street. Photo by Edgar A. YeltonOctober 15th, 2008: Denver’s Western History Digital Collection - The Denver Public Library’s Western History Digital Collection chronicles the people, events, and places that shaped the settlement and growth of the Western frontier. The works of many outstanding photographers are represented and feature images of North American Indians, pioneer life, mining, Buffalo Bill’s Wild West Show, Denver, Colorado towns (such as Cripple Creek, above), and railroads. The complete undigitized collection (materials that have not yet been scanned for viewing online) consists of more than 600,000 prints, negatives, glass negatives, cartes-de-visite, tintypes, photograph albums, and stereocards, the majority dating from the 19th century.
 
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Ad: October 9th, 2008: Not a Cough in a Carload - Stanford School of Medicine’s Lane Library put together Not a Cough in a Carload exhibit in the library’s physical space from February through September 2007. Early in the 20th century, when questions about the health effects of smoking became a topic of widespread discussion, tobacco companies undertook a multifaceted campaign to allay the public’s fears. As terms like “smoker’s cough” and “coffin nails” (referring to cigarettes) began to appear in the popular vernacular, tobacco marketers recognized the need to counter this threat to their livelihood. One strategy was to use endorsements by healthy and vigorous appearing singers, Hollywood stars, and elite athletes. Another was to depict doctors as satisfied and enthusiastic partakers of the smoking habit. In order to extend access to a broader audience and provide expandable digital display space for Robert, Laurie, and Rachel Jackler’s extensive collection of tobacco advertising images, Lane developed this web-based interface. The physical exhibit is on display through December 26 at Healy Hall at the Science, Industry, and Business Library of the New York Public Library, 188 Madison Avenue, at 34th Street.
 
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galveston.jpgOctober 1st, 2008: Galveston and Texas History Center - The Galveston and Texas History Center photographic holdings at the Rosenberg Library number close to 80,000 images. One of the collections documents the hurricane that destroyed Galveston on September 8, 1900, still the deadliest natural disaster in United States history. The storm claimed upwards of 8,000 lives on Galveston Island and several thousand more on the mainland. In Galveston, it destroyed 2,636 houses and left thousands more damaged. The city’s property losses were estimated at $28–$30 million. The Rosenberg Library’s manuscripts, photographs, and other archival holdings provide graphic evidence of survivors’ storm experiences and the carnage that was left in its wake. The library’s special collections were apparently undamaged during Hurricane Ike in September 2008.
 
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Cave in which Daniel Boone spent the winter of 1769-70. C. Frank Dunn Photographs Collection, 1900-1954. Kentucky Historical Society. KNU:1987ph2:3402September 24th, 2008: Kentuckiana Digital Library - The Kentuckiana Digital Library was built to enhance scholarship, research, and lifelong learning through the establishment of access to shared digital archival collections in the state of Kentucky. Hosted by the University of Kentucky, the digital library includes over 80,000 photographic images, 100,000 newspaper pages, 230,000 book pages, hundreds of oral histories, and maps documenting the history and heritage of Kentucky. Participating repositories include the Kentucky Historical Society, Berea College, the Filson Historical Society, Murray State University, and the University of Louisville.
 
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First page of trade pamphlet from ca. 1934 on the Dodge Six automobileSeptember 22nd, 2008: Hagley Digital Archives - The Hagley Digital Archives allow researchers to access digitized items from the collections of the Hagley Museum and Library. Located on 235 acres along the banks of the Brandywine River in Wilmington, Delaware, Hagley is the site of the gunpowder works founded by E. I. du Pont in 1802, and its mission is to collect, preserve, and interpret the history of business and technology in America. Among its special image collections are aerial photos from the Dallin Aerial Survey Company (1924–1941), the Sun Shipbuilding and Dry Dock Company (1917–1983), the Philadelphia and Reading Coal and Iron Company (ca. 1930), the Pierre Gentieu collection of Brandywine Valley images (1880–1920), and the Pusey & Jones Corporation collection (1865–1955). It also includes a small selection (approximately 300 items) from the library’s collection of trade catalogs and pamphlets.
 
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During World War II the Chicago Public Library's Legler Library bookmobile made regular stops at factories on the city's West Side. (Photograph circa 1943). ALA Archives 049-9701055-aSeptember 11th, 2008: Sjoerd Koopman Library Postcard Collection - The Sjoerd Koopman Library Postcard Collection, 1900-2003. Sjoerd Koopman, coordinator of professional activities for the International Federation of Library Associations and Institutions at The Hague, Netherlands, recently made his collection of U.S. library postcards available to the ALA Archives, hosted by the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, which has begun processing them as a digital collection on a state-by-state basis. Subjects include public libraries, private libraries, academic libraries, library interiors, reading rooms, and bookmobiles. The digital collection currently shows 388 postcards from Illinois, Michigan, Wisconsin, and Wyoming; some 3,600 cards from other states will eventually be added.
 
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Phillipe La Hire's Planisphere Celeste MeridionalSeptember 4th, 2008: Star Atlases - The collection of Star Atlases owned by the Linda Hall Library in Kansas City, Missouri. encompasses atlases and maps from 1482 to the 19th century. The materials in this collection range from the rudimentary to some of the most beautiful and accurate scientific books ever published, finishing with later pictorial atlases for the general public. The star chart above is Phillipe La Hire’s Planisphere Celeste Meridional (1705). La Hire was a notable French astronomer, and his two planispheres of the northern and southern stars were published as individual sheets (although they were included in many French atlases throughout the 18th century). The Linda Hall copies were colored expertly by hand. The constellation figures are ultimately derived from the prototypes in Bayer’s Uranometria.
 
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WSB-TV newsfilm clip of African American student protesters singing as they are arrested by police at the Albany Carnegie Library in Albany, Georgia, August 2, 1962August 27th, 2008: Civil Rights Digital Library - The Civil Rights Digital Library promotes an enhanced understanding of the 1960s movement by helping users discover primary sources and other educational materials from libraries, archives, museums, public broadcasters, and others on a national scale. The CRDL features a collection of unedited news film from the WSB (Atlanta) and WALB (Albany, Ga.) television archives held by the Walter J. Brown Media Archives and Peabody Awards Collection at the University of Georgia Libraries. Users can browse by events, places, people, topics, or media type. The CRDL provides educator resources and contextual materials, including Freedom on Film, relating instructive stories and discussion questions from the Civil Rights Movement in Georgia, and the New Georgia Encyclopedia, delivering engaging online articles and multimedia. CRDL is a partnership among librarians, technologists, archivists, educators, scholars, academic publishers, and public broadcasters. It receives support through a National Leadership Grant for Libraries awarded to the University of Georgia by the Institute of Museum and Library Services.
 
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An account of the 1843 trials of James McDermott and Grace Marks for the murders of Marks’ employer, the wealthy Thomas Kinnear, and of Nancy Montgomery, his housekeeper and mistress.August 26th, 2008: Toronto Public’s “Curator’s Showcase” - The Toronto Public Library’s Curator’s Showcase offers seven treasures from its rich and varied special collections, and added pictures, maps, and notes. Using the Library’s interactive software, you can virtually turn the pages of the books, zoom in on the digitized images, and find related texts, images, and sounds. Other features specific to individual books are provided, such as transcriptions of handwritten pages. Included are documents on the trial of James McDermott and Grace Marks (1843), the manuscript The Sad Tale of Mrs. Mole and Mrs. Mouse (1850), ship surgeon Samuel Smith’s logbook (1857), Sketches of Toronto (1858), Lady Conan Doyle’s diary (1914), artillerist Leonard L. Youell’s diary (1916–1918), and original scripts from The Dumbells (1917–1919). This project was inspired by the British Library’s Turning the Pages program.
 
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The broadside contains a complete alphabet of capital letters in Fraktur type and three lower case letters, followed by a four line verse beginning, August 14th, 2008: Pennsylvania German Broadsides and Fraktur - The Pennsylvania German Broadsides and Fraktur digital site includes some 270 images from the holdings of Rare Books and Manuscripts in the Special Collections Library of Pennsylvania State University. Fraktur (the word is both singular and plural) is a German word that originally described a type of printing similar to Old English Gothic. The term today refers to drawings on paper made with pen, ink, and watercolor, using fancy penmanship and illustrations such as birds, hearts, flowers, and angels. Fraktur were commonly used in the 18th and 19th centuries to document births and baptisms, marriages, and house blessings. The collection also includes broadsides (sheets of paper printed on one side only, such as commentaries on religious texts and political events) and German-language newspapers. These documents provide insight into the everyday life of German immigrants and show the process of acculturation of German settlers to their new environment.
 
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Ralph Waldo Emerson Jones was the second president of Grambling (La.) State UniversityAugust 12th, 2008: Historically Black College and University - A Digital Collection Celebrating the Founding of the Historically Black College and University is a collection of primary resources from HBCU libraries and archives. It includes over 1,000 scanned pages and represents HBCU libraries’ first collaborative effort to make a historic collection digitially available. Collections are contributed from member libraries of the Historically Black College and University Library Alliance. The collection includes photographs, university correspondence, manuscripts, images of campus buildings, alumni letters, memorabilia, and programs from campus events.
 
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Weaver birds, illustration from Richard Lydekker's The new natural history (189-). NNH-41July 31st, 2008: Rarities of New York Public - The New York Public Library Digital Gallery provides access to more than 600,000 images digitized from primary sources and printed rarities in the collections of the New York Public Library, including illuminated manuscripts, historical maps, vintage posters, rare prints and photographs, illustrated books, printed ephemera, and more. Encompassing the subject strengths of the vast collections of the Research Libraries, these materials represent the applied sciences, fine and decorative arts, history, performing arts, and social sciences. Some examples of this far-ranging content include artwork such as Goya’s Disasters of War; panoramic cityscapes of New York City’s Fifth Avenue; classic illustrated zoologies and botanies such as Pomona Britannica; George Catlin’s North American Indian Portfolio; Felice Beato’s views of Japan; reformer Thomas A. Larcom’s portrait collection from Dublin’s Mountjoy prison; the Theatre Guild’s first performance of Porgy in 1927; and rare illustrated books such as William Blake’s hand-printed masterpiece of 1793, America, A Prophecy. For each item in the gallery, a high-resolution, 300- to 1200-dpi digital image file has been created using a flatbed scanner or a digital camera. Simultaneously, three low-resolution, 72-dpi derivative files are created for delivery on the Web, at 150 pixels (thumbnail or index image), 300 pixels (detail view) and 760 pixels (enlargement), respectively, on the long side.
 
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Library Reading Room, Princeton University, 1909. AC045 July 23rd, 2008: Historical Postcards of Princeton - Princeton University’s Seeley G. Mudd Manuscript Library offers a digital collection of more than 500 historical postcards depicting the Princeton campus and the towns surrounding it. Featuring both monochrome and color postcards, the bulk of the Historical Postcard Collection ranges in date from 1900 through the 1960s. Both unmarked and canceled postcards exist in the collection, and several postcard makers are represented.
 
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Anti-opium inspectors, Peking, 1917-1919. Photo by Sidney Gamble, roll 284, image 1626July 17th, 2008: China: 1917-1932 - Duke University Libraries recently launched the Sidney D. Gamble Photographs collection of about 5,000 images taken primarily in China between 1917 and 1932 by the grandson of Procter and Gamble cofounder James Gamble. From 1908 to 1932, Sidney Gamble (1890–1968) visited China four times, traveling throughout the country to collect data for socioeconomic surveys and to photograph urban and rural life, public events, architecture, religious statuary, and the countryside. A sociologist, renowned China scholar, and avid amateur photographer, Gamble used some of the pictures to illustrate his books. The Sidney D. Gamble Photographs digital collection marks the first comprehensive public presentation of this large body of work that includes photographs of Korea, Japan, Hawaii, San Francisco, and Russia. His 1908 photographs will be digitized and uploaded as part of future additions to the site.
 
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Joycelyn EldersDale BumpersJuly 10th, 2008: The AV/AR audio/video collection - The AV/AR audio/video collection is a rich source of oral history and other recorded material hosted by the Butler Center for Arkansas Studies, a department of the Central Arkansas Library System. Oral history interviews, lectures about Arkansas, and various kinds of film footage have been indexed with subject descriptions that provide a variety of sources relating to a specific topic. This collection began in the summer of 2007 when the Winthrop Rockefeller Foundation funded a two-year project to explore the role of race relations in Arkansas history. Researchers can search through audio and/or video clips by subject or interviewee, most of which are shorter than two minutes.
 
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Slavery petition, New Castle County, Delaware, 1827June 25th, 2008: The Digital Library on American Slavery - The Digital Library on American Slavery, a cooperative effort of the University of North Carolina at Greensboro, is a searchable database of detailed personal information about slaves, slaveholders, and free people of color. Designed as a tool for genealogists and historians, the site provides access to data collected from legal petitions filed from 1777 to 1867 in all 15 slaveholding states in the United States. This information documents where, when, and by whom slaves were owned, and provides insight into where, when, and how free people of color lived. Petitions can be searched by keyword, named individuals, or topic. The Race and Slavery Petitions Project was established in 1991. Its mission was to locate, collect, organize, and publish all requests for legal remedy, called petitions, filed with the legislatures of the slaveholding South, from the end of the American Revolution to the end of the Civil War. Copies of the original petitions are available on microfilm. Published under the title Race, Slavery, and Free Blacks by University Publications of America, the microfilm version and related guides are published in series according to state groupings and by type of petition—county or legislative.
 
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Ragtime goblin man, composed by Harry Von Tilzer, lyrics by Andrew B. Stirling, published by New York: Harry Von Tilzer Music Pub. Co., 1911. ihs-SHMU_13_03June 18th, 2008: Sheet Music from Indiana - IN Harmony: Sheet Music from Indiana is a search and discovery system for accessing more than 10,000 pieces of sheet music from the Indiana University Lilly Library, the Indiana State Library, the Indiana State Museum, and the Indiana Historical Society. Funded through a National Leadership Grant from the Institute of Museum and Library Services, IN Harmony features Indiana-related sheet music—sheet music by Indiana composers, arrangers, lyricists, or publishers as well as sheet music about the state. The collection includes works by such well-known composers as George M. Cohan, Cole Porter, Al Jolson, and Jerome Kern. Stacy Kowalczyk, IU’s manager of the project, said that one outcome of the project was to work through the issues of providing consistent terminology and mapping to ensure content is retrieved reliably. You can search the entire collection of sheet music by genre, composer, subject, name, title, year, instrumentation, or holding institution.
 
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Letter from Lincoln to Seward, Nov. 23, 1863June 12th, 2008: Lincoln and His Circle - The University of Rochester Rare Books & Special Collections Department’s Lincoln and His Circle project is digitizing the letters to, from, and about Abraham Lincoln that are held in its collections. Many of the letters come from the papers of Secretary of State William H. Steward (donated to the university by William Henry Seward III), and others are found in the Lincoln collection that was a gift of the Fred L. Emerson Foundation of Auburn, New York. Selected transcriptions of the letters are provided.
 
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Great-footed Hawk (common name: Peregrine Falcon). Plate Caption: Great-footed Hawk, Falco Peregrinus. Gmel, Male, I. Female, 2. Green-winged Teal and Gadwal. Plate Number: XVI (16).June 4th, 2008: Audubon Birds of America - The University of Pittsburgh has digitized and mounted online one of the rare, complete sets of John James Audubon’s Birds of America. Only 120 complete sets are known to exist. John James Audubon (1785–1851) set out to paint every known (to him) North American bird in the early 19th century. He eventually stopped at 435 paintings after he exhausted his personal resources. His original paintings of over 1,000 birds, and the hand-colored plates that were subsequently engraved from them, are considered unique. All the birds were painted life-size, and many are shown interacting with other birds and wildlife, often in violent, predatory ways. In August of 2007, the Darlington Digital Library digitized all 435 plates. Each master image comprises over 500 MB and uses an interface that enables users to view portions of the plates at 100%.
 
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The Fox River Grove (Ill.) Public Library bookmobile in the parking lot of the old library location, from a photograph taken sometime in the 1970's.May 28th, 2008: Digital Past - Digital Past is a local history digitization initiative undertaken by libraries, historical societies, museums, and other cultural venues throughout Illinois in partnership with the North Suburban Library System in Wheeling, Illinois. It began in 1998 with a grant from the Illinois State Library and has become a popular resource for researchers of all ages and interests including schoolchildren, genealogists, historians, authors, producers, and special interest groups—for more information, watch the public service annoucement (video). Digital Past contains collections from nearly 40 institutions of varying topics and formats including over 87,000 records in 85 collections….
 
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Pages 8-9 of Tear and Water, by Mahdokht Kashkouli, illustrated by Simin Shahravan, in Persian/Farsi, published in 1987 by Shabaviz Publishing Company in TehranMay 21st, 2008: International Children’s Digital Library - The International Children’s Digital Library is a free online library of digitized children’s books in many languages from various countries. Designed specifically for use by children ages 3 to 13, ICDL is operated by the International Children’s Digital Library Foundation and originally developed in the College of Information Studies and the Human-Computer Interaction Laboratory at the University of Maryland, College Park. Children can search for books by location, color, length, intended age group, content type, and emotional quality, among other qualifiers. An advanced search option is also provided for more experienced or older users, and all users can register to save search preferences and favorite books. Books are selected based on quality and appropriateness, and are presented in their original language with copyright permission from publishers or authors. The Library’s ultimate goal is to foster a love of reading, a readiness to learn, and a response to the challenges of world literacy.
 
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Poster for 4th Annual Royal Chicano Air Force Art Show, 1974. Artist: Clara Favela. California Ethnic and Multicultural Archives, Dept of Special Collections, Donald Davidson Library, UC Santa Barbara.May 16th, 2008: American Social History Online - American Social History Online is a Digital Library Federation portal that provides scholars with access to distributed digital library collections pertaining to American culture and life. Its tools and services are designed to make it easy to find, organize, use, and share items from diverse collections. By using Zotero, a free and easy-to-use research tool that works with the Firefox web browser, scholars can gather and organize resources as well as annotate and share them. To support the use of images, Collectus and ImageViewer tools developed at the University of Virginia are integrated into American Social History Online. These tools not only support saving and organizing image collections but provide for slide-show creation so the image material can be used easily in the classroom. The portal was developed using open source software and is currently available without fees or restrictions through generous support from the Mellon Foundation.
 
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The Yerkes refracting telescope, Williams Bay, Wisconsin, USA, 1915. Photograph of the eyepiece end of the 40 inch refracting telescope inside the dome. Picture Reference: 10418885May 7th, 2008: Science and Society Picture Library - The Science and Society Picture Library in South Kensington, London, represents over a million images from the UK Science Museum; the National Museum of Photography, Film, and Television; and the National Railway Museum. SSPL now has over 150 image collections from both within and outside the museums’ core collections. These contain over 70,000 online records, including more than 40,000 digital images. Collections nclude 4,000 personalities, the Daily Herald and Manchester Daily Express archives, and the work of Julia Margaret Cameron, William Henry Fox Talbot, and Tony Ray-Jones. The library provides transparencies and digital images on loan to clients for reproduction. A small service fee is charged for the loan of the images.
 
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Photograph of John Lum, the first Chinese schoolteacher at the Chinese school, Augusta, Richmond County, Georgia, 1929 or 1930. From the Vanishing Georgia collection, Georgia ArchivesApril 30th, 2008: Digital Library of Georgia - The Digital Library of Georgia is a gateway to Georgia’s history and culture found in digitized books, manuscripts, photographs, government documents, newspapers, maps, audio, video, and other resources. DLG connects users to 500,000 digital objects in 105 collections from 60 institutions and 100 government agencies. Though this represents only a fraction of Georgia’s cultural treasures, DLG continues to grow through its partnerships with libraries, archives, museums, government agencies, and allied organizations across the state. Based at the University of Georgia Libraries, the Digital Library of Georgia is an initiative of GALILEO, the state’s virtual library. Recent additions include materials on the 1936 Gainesville tornado, industrial films of the Georgia Marble Company, the Athens Woman’s Club and social reform, the University of Georgia Bumble-bee (1889–1902), and the Georgia Official and Statistical Register (1922–1990).
 
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Gun embedded in tree as a result of a tornado in New Prague, Minnesota, in 1912
April 23rd, 2008: Minnesota Reflections - Minnesota Reflections features more than 20,000 digital copies of primary resources about Minnesota, including photographs, maps, and documents (with transcriptions). This database project of the Minnesota Digital Library is in its fourth year of providing vital resources to historical organizations across the state. More than 90 organizations have participated in the project to date. The Minnesota Digital Library is a primarily volunteer organization supported by LSTA grants from the Minnesota Department of Education.
 
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University of Delaware President Hullihen trundles off the first wheelbarrow of dirt during the first day's work on the Memorial Library, University of Delaware, Newark, December 11, 1923.April 18th, 2008: University of Delaware Postcard Collection - The University of Delaware Postcard Collection consists of more than 2,000 postcards of Delaware and nearby areas. The postcards date mainly from the end of the 19th to the mid-20th century. Most of the cards in the collection were commercially produced and represent well-known Delaware buildings, monuments, and views, such as the State Capitol in Dover, Wilmington’s downtown buildings and historic structures, and Rehoboth’s beaches and boardwalks. A number of the cards, though, document small-town life in Delaware, including street scenes and domestic buildings. The collection also contains images of places outside the state, most notably Longwood Gardens in nearby Kennett Square, Pennsylvania. Some of these images may not exist in any other format. The captions and written messages on the back of the cards contain a wealth of information about the image on the front and can illuminate many attitudes and interests of the past.
 
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William G. 'Billy' Bruner, a Tulsa Muscogee (Creek) Indian. The caption reads he is a U.S. Deputy Marshal, but Bruner was known for killing U.S. Deputy Marshal Bill Moody in 1889. He died in 1952.April 10th, 2008: Beryl Ford Collection - The Tulsa (Okla.) City-County Library hosts a collection of more than 23,000 digitized photos of Tulsa’s history. In 2004, the Rotary Club of Tulsa, through its not-for-profit subsidiary Tulsa Archives, Inc., purchased from Beryl and Lydia Ford the entire Beryl Ford Collection, the largest and most significant collection of photographs and artifacts relevant to the history of the region. As its official Oklahoma Centennial Project, Rotary teamed with the Tulsa City-County Library and the Tulsa Historical Society to quickly provide the public access to this excellent photographic collection of Tulsa history. A small team of catalogers and other librarians worked for two years to organize and digitize the photo collection, and the process was completed in December 2007.
 
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Duncan Manor, Italianate post-Civil War farmhouse in McLean County, Illinois, currently under restorationApril 2nd, 2008: Towanda Area History - To preserve the history of Towanda, in McLean County, Illinois, and in part inspired by the frequent questions from the public about the Duncan Manor, a three-story Italianate farmhouse built in 1869 and visible from nearby I-55, the Towanda Area Historical Society partnered with the Towanda District Library in 2006 to obtain a digital imaging grant from the Illinois State Library entitled “Capturing Towanda’s Past for Eternity.” The grant allowed for the digitization of more than 1,500 photographs, newspaper articles, documents, and audio interviews. Duncan Manor is being restored by its new owner, Diane Sullivan. Listen to a March 28 podcast interview with Sullivan on its restoration.
 
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First page of the 1859 diary of John Lyman Smith (1828-1898)March 27th, 2008: Mormon Missionary Diaries - The L. Tom Perry Special Collections, housed in the Harold B. Lee Library at Brigham Young University, contains a superb collection of Mormon missionary diaries. After a five-year project supported by Angel Partners Inc., 376 of these diaries (more than 63,000 pages) have now been digitized. The collection contains short biographies of the diarists and images of the original pages alongside typed transcriptions from 114 Church of Latter-Day Saints missionaries who served from the 1830s to the 1960s. Arranged geographically by continents or island groups—including the Pacific, Asia, North America, Great Britain, Scandinavia, and Western Europe—the collection was organized for digitization by BYU students over an 18-month period. The diaries were chosen based on the writer’s ability to be descriptive, introspective, and revealing about experiences, people, and places.
 
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Biennial Report of the State Veterinarian of Nebraska, 1908March 19th, 2008: Nebraska Public Documents - The Nebraska Public Documents project provides free public access to digitized historic annual reports of state agencies in Nebraska for the use of students, scholars, and the general public. Eventually, the project will provide access to state government agency reports from 1891 through 1956, with metadata enhancements as funds become available. Earlier reports will be provided as they are located and digitized. This site is made possible through the funding and support of the Nebraska Library Commission, the Nebraska State Historical Society, the Nebraska State Records Board, the University of Nebraska at Omaha, and the Center for Digital Research in the Humanities at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln.
 
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Jean Thomas, the Traipsin' Woman, poses at her desk in 1939 in her long black 'Narrator' costume from the American Folk Song Festival. She was being filmed by Jack Jacumski of Georgetown, Ohio. ULPA 1979.33.0201March 13th, 2008: University of Louisville Digital Collections - The University of Louisville Digital Collections is a growing resource that includes rare and unique images, documents, and oral histories from the university archives, special collections, and other campus units. Included in the digital library are photos showing Louisville and neighboring areas, Kentucky maps, historic photos by Claude Matlack and Kate Matthews, an African-American oral history collection, the Newton Owen postcard collection, and snapshots of mountain life by Jean Thomas (the “Traipsin’ Woman,” above).
 
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Collection of historic cylinder recordingsMarch 7th, 2008: Cylinder Preservation and Digitization Project - “The Oceana Roll,” performed by Billy Murray, [1911], 846: Edison Amberol. Ragtime song. Vocal solo with orchestra accompaniment. Play it (MP3 file). Cylinder Preservation and Digitization Project, Department of Special Collections, University of California, Santa Barbara. Cylinder recordings, the first commercially produced sound recordings, are a snapshot of musical and popular culture in the decades around the turn of the 20th century. They have long held the fascination of collectors and have presented challenges for playback and preservation by archives and collectors alike. With funding from the Institute of Museum and Library Services, the UCSB Libraries have created a digital collection of nearly 8,000 cylinder recordings held by the Department of Special Collections. In an effort to bring these recordings to a wider audience, they can be freely downloaded or streamed online. On this site you will have the opportunity to find out more about the cylinder format, listen to thousands of musical and spoken selections from the late 19th and early 20th centuries, and discover a little-known era of recorded sound.
 
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March 7th, 2008: Colorado’s Historic Newspaper Collection - Colorado’s Historic Newspaper Collection currently includes 107 newspapers published in Colorado from 1859 to 1930. Newspapers come from 60 cities and 40 counties throughout the state, published in English, German, Spanish, or Swedish. Some 400,000 digitized pages are available. New material is added approximately once a month, depending on availability of funding. The newspapers are digitized from microfilm copies owned by the Colorado Historical Society. CHNC used Olive Software’s ActivePaper Archive, which was designed specifically for providing searchable access to digitized newspapers.
 
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View from the southeast of the Lester Sunderland Residence, 1226 W. 56th St., Kansas City. Sunderland was Chairman of the Ash Grove Lime & Portland Cement Co., June 1932. Photo by Frank Lauder. P22, Lauder Autochrome Collection, S-53, Box 46February 20th, 2008: Missouri Valley Special Collections Digital Gallery - The Missouri Valley Special Collections Digital Gallery offers more than 11,000 images of archival material such as letters, photographs, postcards, advertising cards, and maps from the holdings of the Kansas City (Mo.) Public Library. You’ll find not only historical photos of Kansas City like early downtown street scenes and businesses, schools, and churches, but also photographs of celebrities like Jean Harlow, Joan Crawford, and Walt Disney. Special features of the Gallery include over 300 locally written biographies of well-known deceased Kansas Citians, profiles of over 25 significant Kansas City buildings, and the Local History index to numerous articles in magazines, newsletters, newspapers, books, as well as factual entries on topics of interest to the Missouri Valley area and Kansas City specifically.
 
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Marie Brown, African-American pharmacy student at the University of Iowa, 1930February 14th, 2008: Iowa Digital Library - The Iowa Digital Library contains more than 95,000 digital objects—photographs, maps, sound recordings, and documents—from libraries and archives at University of Iowa and their partnering institutions. The digital library also includes faculty research collections and bibliographic tools (holdings information for some library materials that are not otherwise accessible through the online catalog). Digital collections are coordinated by Digital Library Services, which manages the preservation, delivery, and structure of the libraries’ digital content. A new segment of the digital library features African-American women at the University of Iowa, 1910–1960. Though the University of Iowa was one of the first institutions to open admission to African Americans, African-American women students at the University have often had to overcome other barriers to an equal education. This collection brings together newspaper articles, photographs, correspondence, oral histories, and other primary sources chronicling their university experiences.
 
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Student participating in Civil Rights protest at Arkansas Agricultural, Mechanical & Normal College, Pine Bluff  (now part of UA Pine Bluff), ca. 1962. From the Orval Faubus Collection, University of Arkansas, FayettevilleFebruary 7th, 2008: Land of (Unequal) Opportunity: Documenting the Civil Rights Struggle in Arkansas - The University of Arkansas Libraries Special Collections Department has completed a major effort to digitize a large number of sources documenting the history of the civil rights movement in Arkansas. Launched February 1, the project, titled Land of (Unequal) Opportunity: Documenting the Civil Rights Struggle in Arkansas, culminates the library’s celebration of the 50th anniversary of the Little Rock Central High School crisis of 1957. The website offers access to more than 2,000 pages of documents, photos, broadsides, pamphlets, drawings, cartoons, and other images. While the project gives emphasis to the 1957 crisis, it also documents the civil rights struggle in a number of fields in addition to race relations. Also included are interesting documents that detail the history of legal and civil rights for women (Arkansas was one of the early states in America to grant property rights to married women, in 1846), gays, and Japanese Americans who were relocated to Arkansas during World War II.
 
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J. G. Bartholomew's Island of Bombay, from volume 8 of the Imperial gazetteer of India. New edition, published under the authority of His Majesty's Secretary of State for India in Council. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1907-1909.January 30th, 2008: Digital South Asia Library - The Digital South Asia Library provides digital materials for reference and research on South Asia to scholars, public officials, business leaders, and other users. This project builds upon a two-year pilot project funded by the Association of Research Libraries’ Global Resources Program with support from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation. Participants in the Digital South Asia Library include leading U.S. universities, the Center for Research Libraries, the South Asia Microform Project, the Committee on South Asian Libraries and Documentation, the Association for Asian Studies, the Library of Congress, the Asia Society, the British Library, the University of Oxford, the University of Cambridge, MOZHI in India, the Sundarayya Vignana Kendram in India, Madan Puraskar Pustakalaya in Nepal, and other institutions in South Asia.
 
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Advertisement for Record Tea from the Wellington Evening Post, April 12, 1910January 24th, 2008: Papers Past - Papers Past contains more than one million pages of digitized New Zealand newspapers and periodicals. Developed by the National Library of New Zealand in Wellington, the collection covers the years 1840 to 1915 and includes publications from all regions of the country. In 2006–2007, digital versions of the Nelson Examiner and New Zealand Chronicle, Hawera and Normanby Star, and the North Otago Times were added. The newspapers in Papers Past are a good source of information about the social and political events of the times. Researchers of family history and genealogy will find the shipping news, births, deaths, and marriages of interest. Advertising also features strongly.
 
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Pan American World Airlines menu, PA Flight 106, Washington to London, May 2, 1983. Meals served: Breakfast; Dinner. Items on menu: Appetizers; Cheese; Entrees; Dessert; Beverage list. Representative dish: Egg Cote d'Azure. Record number PAWA036.January 18th, 2008: Northwestern Transportation Library’s Menu Collection - The Northwestern University Transportation Library’s Menu Collection currently includes more than 400 menus from 54 national and international airline carriers, cruise ships, and railroad companies, with coverage from 1929 to the present. U.S. airlines predominate, but European, Asian, African, Australasian, and South American companies are also represented, with particular strength from the 1960s to the late 1980s. The collection began as a gift from Northwestern alumnus George M. Foster who donated his extensive menu collection to the Transportation Library in 1997, where it has since been expanded from other sources. Digitization of the menus was performed according to Northwestern University Library’s established standards for digital imaging: 600 dpi uncompressed TIFF 24-bit color for archival masters and JPEG2000 for delivery.
 
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Republican mural, Ardoyne Road, Ardoyne, 2001. Mural draws parallel between the Civil Rights struggle in the USA, specifically the desegregation of schools in Little Rock Arkansas in 1957, and the right of Catholic schoolchildren at to walk to Holy Cross primary school through a Protestant area. Detail: middle panel, 'Everyone has the right to live free from sectarian harassment'; mother taking two Holy Cross children (in red school cardigans) to school, 'It's Black and White', 'Loyalist Bigotry' slogan on wall behind. Photo by Tony Crowley.January 3rd, 2008: Claremont Colleges (Calif.) Digital Library - The Claremont Colleges (Calif.) Digital Library offers a variety of historical collections, including: voices of the key participants in the American occupation of Japan; Japanese woodblock prints and illustrated books (17th–20th c.); drawings and photographs of Edward Vischer (1809–1878); and prints by Francisco Goya (1746–1828). The Claremont collection of Murals of Northern Ireland includes images of both Republican and Loyalist street paintings. The murals are vivid records of historical events, political standpoints, community concerns, and ideological statements. Managed by the Claremont Libraries, the CCDL was established in 2004/2005 by the academic deans of the Claremont Colleges upon their approval of recommendations from cross-colleges Task Force.
 
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Jicarilla Apaches at the Indian Congress. Photo taken by F. A. Rinehart, 1898. TMI number 00911 December 19th, 2007: The Omaha Public Library - The Omaha (Nebr.) Public Library hosts a website devoted to images from the Trans Mississippi and International Exposition and the concurrent Indian Congress that were held in Omaha, June 1–November 1, 1898. During the four months of the Exposition, more than 2.6 million people came to view its 4,062 exhibits. And the Indian Congress, occurring within a decade of the end of the Indian Wars, was the largest Native American gathering of its kind. The Omaha digital collection consists of approximately 1,800 photographs of the Trans Mississippi Exposition taken by F.A. Rinehart, its official photographer and the only photographer allowed on the grounds. Over 500 of these images include portraits and scenes from the Indian Congress.
 
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Americus, ca. 1945. Furniture being moved out of Mather of Americus, Store Number 2. The driver of the wagon is Grantland G. Rowe. From the Georgia Archives in Morrow. Image: sum017December 12th, 2007: Digital Library of Georgia - The Digital Library of Georgia is an initiative based at the University of Georgia Libraries that connects users to 500,000 digital objects in 105 collections from 60 institutions and 100 government agencies. Users can browse by topic, time period, county, institution, media type, or collection. One of the collections is Vanishing Georgia, comprising nearly 18,000 photographs. Ranging from daguerreotypes to Kodachrome prints, the images span over 100 years of Georgia history. The broad subject matter of these photographs, shot by both amateurs and professionals, includes family and business life, school and civic activities, important individuals and events in Georgia history, and landscapes. The wide variety of the collected visual images results from efforts by archivists from the Georgia Division of Archives and History who sought, between 1975 and 1996, to preserve Georgia’s endangered historical photographs.
 
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Illuminated initial letter F with electrician working on utility pole under power lines. Ink drawing on tissue paper by Father Edward Catich, St. Ambrose University. [Illuminated Initial Letters 056]December 5th, 2007: The Catich Collection - The Catich Collection at St. Ambrose University in Davenport, Iowa, provides digital access to the artwork of Fr. Edward Catich (1906–1979), one of the world’s finest calligraphers. Catich was known as an international authority on stone incising, typography, and stained glass fabrication, and as the foremost authority on the Roman alphabet, its origin, nature, and history. The university owns nearly 5,000 Catich works, ranging from sketch books and small drawings to major pieces of art: primarily watercolors, ink drawings, and carved slates. A long-term goal of this project is to promote public and scholarly awareness of his achievements and to develop a broader appreciation for the aesthetics of his work.
 
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Catedral de Santa María de Tarragona, 1277-1375, view of West Portal. Arts.csls3443.bibNovember 28th, 2007: Casselman Architecture Image Collection - Catedral de Santa María de Tarragona, 1277-1375, view of West Portal. Arts.csls3443.bib - This University of Wisconsin, Madison, digital collection contains over 4,000 color slides and black-and-white photographs of medieval Spain taken by the late Eugene Casselman (1912–1996) during his 30 years of travel throughout the Iberian peninsula. The images span more than 1,000 years of architectural history, from the 7th to the 17th century. The majority of the slides focus on the Mudejar style, an ornate court style largely inspired by Spanish Islamic architecture that was shared among Islamic, Jewish, and Christian cultures during the later Middle Ages in Spain. Casselman taught voice and music history at Gustavus Adolphus College, Colorado Technical College, Downer College, and Lawrence University. He exhibited some of the photographs from this collection in 1983 at the then Elvehjem Museum of Art. The slides and photographs were donated to the Department of Art History by Eugene Casselman’s widow, Frances, and his children.
 
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The Dog's Grand Dinner Party, from the Dame Dingle's series created by John Karst (1836-1922). Bibliographic ID number: UF00000167.
November 21st, 2007: The Baldwin Library of Historical Children’s Literature - The Baldwin Library of Historical Children’s Literature in the Department of Special Collections at the University of Florida’s George A. Smathers Libraries contains more than 100,000 volumes published in Great Britain and the United States from the early 1700s through the current year. Its holdings of more than 800 early American imprints is the second largest such collection in the United States. The product of Ruth Baldwin’s 40-year collection development efforts, this vast assemblage of literature printed primarily for children offers an equally vast territory of topics for the researcher to explore: education and upbringing; family and gender roles; civic values; racial, religious, and moral attitudes; literary style and format; and the arts of illustration and book design. 
 
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Composite view of three images from Fort Bragg, N.C. The image labeled November 15th, 2007: North Carolina Postcards - North Carolina Postcards. The North Carolina Collection Photographic Archives at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill’s Wilson Library holds more than 12,000 North Carolina postcards contained primarily in two collections: the North Carolina Postcard Collection and the recently acquired Durwood Barbour Collection of North Carolina Postcards. This digital project contains a selection of those materials, including at least one image for each of North Carolina’s 100 counties. The online collection is searchable by location and topic. WRAL-TV in Raleigh interviewed Durwood Barbour about his collection, which was on exhibit at the Wilson Library in September.
 
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November 8th, 2007: The New York Public Library – In Motion: The African-American Migration Experience - The African-American Migration Experience - New societies, new peoples, and new communities usually originate in acts of migration. Someone or ones decide to move from one place to another. They choose a new destination and sever their ties with their traditional community or society as they set out in search of new opportunities, new challenges, new lives, and new life worlds. Most societies in human history have a migration narrative in their stories of origin. All communities in American society trace their origins in the United States to one or more migration experiences. America, after all, is “a nation of immigrants.” But until recently, people of African descent have not been counted as part of America’s migratory tradition. The transatlantic slave trade has created an enduring image of black men and women as transported commodities, and is usually considered the most defining element in the construction of the African Diaspora, but it is centuries of additional movements that have given shape to the nation we know today. This is the story that has not been told. In Motion: The African-American Migration Experience presents a new interpretation of African-American history, one that focuses on the self-motivated activities of peoples of African descent to remake themselves and their worlds. Of the thirteen defining migrations that formed and transformed African America, only the transatlantic slave trade and the domestic slave trades were coerced, the eleven others were voluntary movements of resourceful and creative men and women, risk-takers in an exploitative and hostile environment. Their survival skills, efficient networks, and dynamic culture enabled them to thrive and spread, and to be at the very core of the settlement and development of the Americas. Their hopeful journeys changed not only their world and the fabric of the African Diaspora but also the Western Hemisphere.
 
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Ierusalem moderne, by Alain Manesson Mallet. Frankfurt am Main, [1684-85]. 138x96 mm. Copperplate.November 2nd, 2007: Ancient Maps of Jerusalem - Ancient Maps of Jerusalem is a joint project of the Jewish National and University Library and the Department of Geography of the Hebrew University of Jerusalem. It was made possible by generous grants of David and Fella Shapell (the JNUL digitization project) and the Hebrew University’s Historic Cities Research Project. Before the advent of print, maps of Jerusalem were often inscribed on vellum, or more rarely created as wall or floor mosaics. From the late 15th century when the first printed map of Jerusalem appeared, until the beginning of the 19th century when maps began to be based on accurate surveys, more than 300 maps of Jerusalem were designed and printed. This beautiful collection of ancient maps of Jerusalem is part of the Eran Laor Cartographic Collection, donated in 1975 to the Jewish National and University Library in Jerusalem by the famous collector Eran Laor.
 
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October 4th, 2007: The Making of America - The University of Michigan’s Making of America site is a digital library of primary sources in American social history from the antebellum period through reconstruction. The collection is particularly strong in the subject areas of education, psychology, American history, sociology, religion, and science and technology. The collection currently contains approximately 10,000 books and 50,000 journal articles with 19th-century imprints. The initial phase of the project, begun in the fall of 1995, focused on developing a collaborative effort between the University of Michigan and Cornell University.
 
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Archive updated 2/2012